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Boeing to offer 777X as business jet

written by australianaviation.com.au | December 11, 2018
An artist's impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-8X and BBJ 777-9X. (Boeing)
An artist’s impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-8X and BBJ 777-9X. (Boeing)

Boeing has added its in-development 777X family of aircraft comprising the 777-8X and 777-9X to its business jet BBJ lineup.

The BBJ 777X would be available in both the 777-8 and 777-9 models, Boeing announced at the Middle East Business Aviation Association Show (MEBAA).

“Our most exclusive customers want to travel with the best space and comfort and fly directly to their destination,” Boeing Business Jets head Greg Laxton said in a statement on Monday (UAE time).

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“The new BBJ 777X will be able to do this like no other airplane before it, redefining ultra-long range VIP travel.”

Boeing said BBJ 777-8 would have a range of 11,645nm and a cabin size of 302.5 square metres.

Meanwhile, the larger BBJ 777-9 would offer a cabin measuring 342.7 square metres and be capable of flying up to 11,000nm.

The potential range of the Boeing BBJ 777X lineup. (Boeing)
The potential range of the Boeing BBJ 777X lineup. (Boeing)
An artist's impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-X. (Boeing)
An artist’s impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-X. (Boeing)

Boeing commissioned Greenpoint Technologies, Jet Aviation, and Unique Aircraft Design to showcase the potential of the large widebody in a business jet configuration.

PROMOTED CONTENT

Here are some of their concepts:

The living room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Greenpoint Technologies)
The living room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Greenpoint Technologies)
A concept of Boeing BBJ 777-X interior. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
A concept of Boeing BBJ 777-X interior. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The bedroom concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The bedroom concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The workspace concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Unique Aircraft)
The workspace concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Unique Aircraft)
The dining room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The dining room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)

Flight tests for commercial 777-X set to begin in 2019

Boeing said in November it has completed the “final body join”, where the nose, mid and aft sections are connected, on the first 777-X flight test aircraft, a 777-9X.

The “final body join” of the first flight test aircraft follows the assembly of a 777-X that will be used for ground testing, in mid-September.

Flight tests for the 777-9X were due to begin in 2019, with entry into service expected in 2020.

Meanwhile, entry into service for the 777-8X, was expected to enter service in 2022.

The 777-X will be powered by General Electric GE9X engines. Flight tests for those engines began in March 2018.

A look at the Boeing 777-X flight deck. (Boeing)
A look at the Boeing 777-X flight deck. (Boeing)

AA PODCAST #22: A look at the GE9X engine with with Ted Ingling

Fly into Spring with Australian Aviation’s latest print edition. Starting from $49.95 a year, you can read comprehensive coverage on all sectors of the industry to keep you in the loop. Get your hands on the subscription today. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

2 Comments

  • Shane Couch

    says:

    Not a seatbelt in sight!

    • Stuart

      says:

      @ Shane, they are artists renderings so no seat belts. A real aircraft with seats certified for take off and landing might look very different.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Boeing to offer 777X as business jet

written by australianaviation.com.au | December 11, 2018
An artist's impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-8X and BBJ 777-9X. (Boeing)
An artist’s impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-8X and BBJ 777-9X. (Boeing)

Boeing has added its in-development 777X family of aircraft comprising the 777-8X and 777-9X to its business jet BBJ lineup.

The BBJ 777X would be available in both the 777-8 and 777-9 models, Boeing announced at the Middle East Business Aviation Association Show (MEBAA).

“Our most exclusive customers want to travel with the best space and comfort and fly directly to their destination,” Boeing Business Jets head Greg Laxton said in a statement on Monday (UAE time).

Advertisement
Advertisement

“The new BBJ 777X will be able to do this like no other airplane before it, redefining ultra-long range VIP travel.”

Boeing said BBJ 777-8 would have a range of 11,645nm and a cabin size of 302.5 square metres.

Meanwhile, the larger BBJ 777-9 would offer a cabin measuring 342.7 square metres and be capable of flying up to 11,000nm.

The potential range of the Boeing BBJ 777X lineup. (Boeing)
The potential range of the Boeing BBJ 777X lineup. (Boeing)
An artist's impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-X. (Boeing)
An artist’s impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-X. (Boeing)

Boeing commissioned Greenpoint Technologies, Jet Aviation, and Unique Aircraft Design to showcase the potential of the large widebody in a business jet configuration.

PROMOTED CONTENT

Here are some of their concepts:

The living room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Greenpoint Technologies)
The living room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Greenpoint Technologies)
A concept of Boeing BBJ 777-X interior. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
A concept of Boeing BBJ 777-X interior. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The bedroom concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The bedroom concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The workspace concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Unique Aircraft)
The workspace concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Unique Aircraft)
The dining room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The dining room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)

Flight tests for commercial 777-X set to begin in 2019

Boeing said in November it has completed the “final body join”, where the nose, mid and aft sections are connected, on the first 777-X flight test aircraft, a 777-9X.

The “final body join” of the first flight test aircraft follows the assembly of a 777-X that will be used for ground testing, in mid-September.

Flight tests for the 777-9X were due to begin in 2019, with entry into service expected in 2020.

Meanwhile, entry into service for the 777-8X, was expected to enter service in 2022.

The 777-X will be powered by General Electric GE9X engines. Flight tests for those engines began in March 2018.

A look at the Boeing 777-X flight deck. (Boeing)
A look at the Boeing 777-X flight deck. (Boeing)

AA PODCAST #22: A look at the GE9X engine with with Ted Ingling

Fly into Spring with Australian Aviation’s latest print edition. Starting from $49.95 a year, you can read comprehensive coverage on all sectors of the industry to keep you in the loop. Get your hands on the subscription today. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

2 Comments

  • Shane Couch

    says:

    Not a seatbelt in sight!

    • Stuart

      says:

      @ Shane, they are artists renderings so no seat belts. A real aircraft with seats certified for take off and landing might look very different.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Boeing to offer 777X as business jet

written by australianaviation.com.au | December 11, 2018
An artist's impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-8X and BBJ 777-9X. (Boeing)
An artist’s impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-8X and BBJ 777-9X. (Boeing)

Boeing has added its in-development 777X family of aircraft comprising the 777-8X and 777-9X to its business jet BBJ lineup.

The BBJ 777X would be available in both the 777-8 and 777-9 models, Boeing announced at the Middle East Business Aviation Association Show (MEBAA).

“Our most exclusive customers want to travel with the best space and comfort and fly directly to their destination,” Boeing Business Jets head Greg Laxton said in a statement on Monday (UAE time).

Advertisement
Advertisement

“The new BBJ 777X will be able to do this like no other airplane before it, redefining ultra-long range VIP travel.”

Boeing said BBJ 777-8 would have a range of 11,645nm and a cabin size of 302.5 square metres.

Meanwhile, the larger BBJ 777-9 would offer a cabin measuring 342.7 square metres and be capable of flying up to 11,000nm.

The potential range of the Boeing BBJ 777X lineup. (Boeing)
The potential range of the Boeing BBJ 777X lineup. (Boeing)
An artist's impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-X. (Boeing)
An artist’s impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-X. (Boeing)

Boeing commissioned Greenpoint Technologies, Jet Aviation, and Unique Aircraft Design to showcase the potential of the large widebody in a business jet configuration.

PROMOTED CONTENT

Here are some of their concepts:

The living room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Greenpoint Technologies)
The living room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Greenpoint Technologies)
A concept of Boeing BBJ 777-X interior. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
A concept of Boeing BBJ 777-X interior. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The bedroom concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The bedroom concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The workspace concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Unique Aircraft)
The workspace concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Unique Aircraft)
The dining room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The dining room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)

Flight tests for commercial 777-X set to begin in 2019

Boeing said in November it has completed the “final body join”, where the nose, mid and aft sections are connected, on the first 777-X flight test aircraft, a 777-9X.

The “final body join” of the first flight test aircraft follows the assembly of a 777-X that will be used for ground testing, in mid-September.

Flight tests for the 777-9X were due to begin in 2019, with entry into service expected in 2020.

Meanwhile, entry into service for the 777-8X, was expected to enter service in 2022.

The 777-X will be powered by General Electric GE9X engines. Flight tests for those engines began in March 2018.

A look at the Boeing 777-X flight deck. (Boeing)
A look at the Boeing 777-X flight deck. (Boeing)

AA PODCAST #22: A look at the GE9X engine with with Ted Ingling

Fly into Spring with Australian Aviation’s latest print edition. Starting from $49.95 a year, you can read comprehensive coverage on all sectors of the industry to keep you in the loop. Get your hands on the subscription today. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

2 Comments

  • Shane Couch

    says:

    Not a seatbelt in sight!

    • Stuart

      says:

      @ Shane, they are artists renderings so no seat belts. A real aircraft with seats certified for take off and landing might look very different.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Boeing to offer 777X as business jet

written by australianaviation.com.au | December 11, 2018
An artist's impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-8X and BBJ 777-9X. (Boeing)
An artist’s impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-8X and BBJ 777-9X. (Boeing)

Boeing has added its in-development 777X family of aircraft comprising the 777-8X and 777-9X to its business jet BBJ lineup.

The BBJ 777X would be available in both the 777-8 and 777-9 models, Boeing announced at the Middle East Business Aviation Association Show (MEBAA).

“Our most exclusive customers want to travel with the best space and comfort and fly directly to their destination,” Boeing Business Jets head Greg Laxton said in a statement on Monday (UAE time).

Advertisement
Advertisement

“The new BBJ 777X will be able to do this like no other airplane before it, redefining ultra-long range VIP travel.”

Boeing said BBJ 777-8 would have a range of 11,645nm and a cabin size of 302.5 square metres.

Meanwhile, the larger BBJ 777-9 would offer a cabin measuring 342.7 square metres and be capable of flying up to 11,000nm.

The potential range of the Boeing BBJ 777X lineup. (Boeing)
The potential range of the Boeing BBJ 777X lineup. (Boeing)
An artist's impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-X. (Boeing)
An artist’s impression of a Boeing BBJ 777-X. (Boeing)

Boeing commissioned Greenpoint Technologies, Jet Aviation, and Unique Aircraft Design to showcase the potential of the large widebody in a business jet configuration.

PROMOTED CONTENT

Here are some of their concepts:

The living room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Greenpoint Technologies)
The living room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Greenpoint Technologies)
A concept of Boeing BBJ 777-X interior. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
A concept of Boeing BBJ 777-X interior. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The bedroom concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The bedroom concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The workspace concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Unique Aircraft)
The workspace concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Unique Aircraft)
The dining room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)
The dining room concept for the BBJ 777-X. (Boeing/Jet Aviation)

Flight tests for commercial 777-X set to begin in 2019

Boeing said in November it has completed the “final body join”, where the nose, mid and aft sections are connected, on the first 777-X flight test aircraft, a 777-9X.

The “final body join” of the first flight test aircraft follows the assembly of a 777-X that will be used for ground testing, in mid-September.

Flight tests for the 777-9X were due to begin in 2019, with entry into service expected in 2020.

Meanwhile, entry into service for the 777-8X, was expected to enter service in 2022.

The 777-X will be powered by General Electric GE9X engines. Flight tests for those engines began in March 2018.

A look at the Boeing 777-X flight deck. (Boeing)
A look at the Boeing 777-X flight deck. (Boeing)

AA PODCAST #22: A look at the GE9X engine with with Ted Ingling

Fly into Spring with Australian Aviation’s latest print edition. Starting from $49.95 a year, you can read comprehensive coverage on all sectors of the industry to keep you in the loop. Get your hands on the subscription today. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

2 Comments

  • Shane Couch

    says:

    Not a seatbelt in sight!

    • Stuart

      says:

      @ Shane, they are artists renderings so no seat belts. A real aircraft with seats certified for take off and landing might look very different.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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