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Checks find new faulty Trent 900s

written by australianaviation.com.au | December 10, 2010
A Trent 900 on Qantas A380 VH-OQC. (Damien Aiello)

Checks ordered by the ATSB to look for the fault suspected of causing the QF32 uncontained engine failure have discovered a further three affected Trent 900 engines, one of which was fitted to a yet to be delivered Qantas A380.

“Three engines failed the inspection and were removed from service for further examination,” the ATSB said on December 8. “All Qantas aircraft engines currently flying had no defects recorded and remain in service.”

The ATSB says 45 Rolls-Royce Trent 900 engines were inspected, and while the two Qantas A380s returned to service (VH-OQE and VH-OQF) were cleared, it has since emerged that one of the three Trent 900s discovered to feature the same fault was fitted to a brand new Qantas A380, VH-OQG, due for delivery to Qantas this month. Airbus is swapping out the affected engine so the aircraft may still be delivered this month.

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According to reports the other two affected engines were discovered on Lufthansa and Singapore Airlines A380s.

The ATSB on December 2 issued a safety recommendation calling for the inspection of an oil tube connection to the Trent 900’s high pressure/intermediate pressure bearing structure, after it found misaligned countering boring in the tube, thought in turn to have led to fatigue cracking and the oil leak which led to the uncontained failure of QF32’s number 2 engine.

Checks find new faulty Trent 900s

written by australianaviation.com.au | December 10, 2010
A Trent 900 on Qantas A380 VH-OQC. (Damien Aiello)

Checks ordered by the ATSB to look for the fault suspected of causing the QF32 uncontained engine failure have discovered a further three affected Trent 900 engines, one of which was fitted to a yet to be delivered Qantas A380.

“Three engines failed the inspection and were removed from service for further examination,” the ATSB said on December 8. “All Qantas aircraft engines currently flying had no defects recorded and remain in service.”

The ATSB says 45 Rolls-Royce Trent 900 engines were inspected, and while the two Qantas A380s returned to service (VH-OQE and VH-OQF) were cleared, it has since emerged that one of the three Trent 900s discovered to feature the same fault was fitted to a brand new Qantas A380, VH-OQG, due for delivery to Qantas this month. Airbus is swapping out the affected engine so the aircraft may still be delivered this month.

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According to reports the other two affected engines were discovered on Lufthansa and Singapore Airlines A380s.

The ATSB on December 2 issued a safety recommendation calling for the inspection of an oil tube connection to the Trent 900’s high pressure/intermediate pressure bearing structure, after it found misaligned countering boring in the tube, thought in turn to have led to fatigue cracking and the oil leak which led to the uncontained failure of QF32’s number 2 engine.

Checks find new faulty Trent 900s

written by australianaviation.com.au | December 10, 2010
A Trent 900 on Qantas A380 VH-OQC. (Damien Aiello)

Checks ordered by the ATSB to look for the fault suspected of causing the QF32 uncontained engine failure have discovered a further three affected Trent 900 engines, one of which was fitted to a yet to be delivered Qantas A380.

“Three engines failed the inspection and were removed from service for further examination,” the ATSB said on December 8. “All Qantas aircraft engines currently flying had no defects recorded and remain in service.”

The ATSB says 45 Rolls-Royce Trent 900 engines were inspected, and while the two Qantas A380s returned to service (VH-OQE and VH-OQF) were cleared, it has since emerged that one of the three Trent 900s discovered to feature the same fault was fitted to a brand new Qantas A380, VH-OQG, due for delivery to Qantas this month. Airbus is swapping out the affected engine so the aircraft may still be delivered this month.

Advertisement
Advertisement

According to reports the other two affected engines were discovered on Lufthansa and Singapore Airlines A380s.

The ATSB on December 2 issued a safety recommendation calling for the inspection of an oil tube connection to the Trent 900’s high pressure/intermediate pressure bearing structure, after it found misaligned countering boring in the tube, thought in turn to have led to fatigue cracking and the oil leak which led to the uncontained failure of QF32’s number 2 engine.

Checks find new faulty Trent 900s

written by australianaviation.com.au | December 10, 2010
A Trent 900 on Qantas A380 VH-OQC. (Damien Aiello)

Checks ordered by the ATSB to look for the fault suspected of causing the QF32 uncontained engine failure have discovered a further three affected Trent 900 engines, one of which was fitted to a yet to be delivered Qantas A380.

“Three engines failed the inspection and were removed from service for further examination,” the ATSB said on December 8. “All Qantas aircraft engines currently flying had no defects recorded and remain in service.”

The ATSB says 45 Rolls-Royce Trent 900 engines were inspected, and while the two Qantas A380s returned to service (VH-OQE and VH-OQF) were cleared, it has since emerged that one of the three Trent 900s discovered to feature the same fault was fitted to a brand new Qantas A380, VH-OQG, due for delivery to Qantas this month. Airbus is swapping out the affected engine so the aircraft may still be delivered this month.

Advertisement
Advertisement

According to reports the other two affected engines were discovered on Lufthansa and Singapore Airlines A380s.

The ATSB on December 2 issued a safety recommendation calling for the inspection of an oil tube connection to the Trent 900’s high pressure/intermediate pressure bearing structure, after it found misaligned countering boring in the tube, thought in turn to have led to fatigue cracking and the oil leak which led to the uncontained failure of QF32’s number 2 engine.

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