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Boeing submits AH-64E for Project LAND 4503 helicopter replacement

written by australianaviation.com.au | September 4, 2019
A file image of an AH-64D Apache, a contender for Project LAND 4503, at Exercise Talisman Saber 2019. (Defence)
A file image of an AH-64D Apache, a contender for Project LAND 4503, at Exercise Talisman Saber 2019. (Defence)

Boeing has put forward its AH-64E Apache in response to the Australian government’s Project LAND 4503 armed reconnaissance helicopter (ARH) replacement request for information (RFI).

Meanwhile, Bell has talked up up its AH-1Z “Viper” helicopter as a potential replacement for the Australian Army’s Tiger ARH. However, the company stopped short of confirming it had made a submission.

Boeing said it a statement on August 30 2019 it had put forward its AH-64E Guardian Apache attack helicopter to replace the Australian Army’s fleet of 22 Airbus Helicopters Tiger ARH.

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Advertisement

“Australia would not only benefit from the AH-64’s mission capabilities, it would also enjoy its technological and strategic advantages against adversary aircraft; a global parts and supply network and a domestic training, support and sustainment team,” Boeing said.

The AH-64E is the latest version of the AH-64D Longbow Apache, and features an enhanced combat system and the ability to be integrated with unmanned systems.

The United States, United Kingdom, India, Indonesia, Taiwan, among others, have committed to buying the AH-64E. The aircraft offered the ability to integrate with US and other regional forces in combined operations.

“Boeing’s AH-64E Apache is known for its survivability, sustainability, interoperability and reconnaissance capability,” Terry Jamison from Boeing Global Sales and Marketing, Defense, Space and Security said

PROMOTED CONTENT

“As an Apache operator, Australia would join coalition countries, including the US and UK, and regional partners Singapore, Indonesia, Japan and the Republic of Korea.”

Boeing Defence Australia vice president and managing director Darren Edwards added: “The benefits of Apache for Australia are more significant than continued platform upgrades. Boeing plans to deliver support services in-country and engage local suppliers to maximise Australian industry involvement for the ARH replacement program.”

The US Army has a planned ongoing upgrade program which will see the AH-64E serve into the 2040s, and Boeing said Australia could stay in lockstep with that program to ensure it had the latest capabilities as they were rolled out across a larger fleet.

Project LAND 4503 sought a total of 29 airframes to replace the 22 Tigers. It specified that 24 aircraft would be operational at a single location and five airframes will be assigned to training.

Designed to “deliver armed reconnaissance efforts in close and deep contested battlespace”, the RFI called for an initial operational capability (IOC) of one squadron of 12 aircraft in 2026, and a fully operational capability (FOC) to follow in 2028.

It states that at IOC Army would be able to operationally deploy a troop of four aircraft. At FOC, Army would be capable of generating 12 aircraft for deployment while maintaining a training system of five aircraft.

Two Apaches from the United States Army’s 6th Cavalry Regiment during a joint exercise with Australian forces. (Defence)
Two Apaches from the United States Army’s 6th Cavalry Regiment during a joint exercise with Australian forces. (Defence)

Bell highlights proven AH-1Z Viper suitability for Project LAND 4503

Meanwhile, Bell has extolled the virtues of its AH-1Z “Viper” helicopter as a potential replacement for the Australian Army’s Tiger ARH.

Although the company did not directly confirm it had responded to the LAND 4503 armed reconnaissance helicopter replacement RFI which closed on August 30, the company issued a statement listing the capability and performance attributes of the AH-1Z, which neatly align with those of the RFI.

“The combat proven Bell AH-1Z Viper is the only marinised attack helicopter in the world that is specifically designed and built for expeditionary and maritime operations,” the Bell statement said.

“Marinisation is more than just corrosion protection against saltwater. Unlike unproven and costly add-ons, Bell’s marinisation begins at aircraft design and is built into the aircraft at point of manufacture to insure conformity to shipboard operations.”

The Bell AH-1Z Viper is a potential manned replacement for the Tiger. (Defence)
The Bell AH-1Z Viper is a potential manned replacement for the Tiger. (Defence)

The company said the marinisation process also included the AH-1Z’s composite rotor blades and yoke style main rotor hubs which significantly outperformed legacy “strap-pack” type systems that were prone to corrosion and failure.

The AH-1Z, “also includes semi-automatic blade folding for quick stowage either on board ship or for rapid C-17 deployment, rotor brakes, ease of maintenance, electromagnetic environmental effects (E3) hardening which provides safety against the ship’s powerful radars and other sensors from interfering with aircraft onboard weapons and systems”.

The company also noted the Viper’s commonality with those helicopters operated by the US Marine Corps, some of which were based in Australia on regular rotations to the Northern Territory, as well as being permanently deployed to the wider region.

Bell’s statement effectively confirmed the LAND 4503 project would be a race between three contenders – the AH-1Z, Boeing’s AH-64E Guardian Apache, and a significantly upgraded Tiger ARH offered by Airbus Helicopters.

A United States Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper helicopter departing HMAS Adelaide during a multi-spot exercise in 2018. (Defence)
A United States Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper helicopter departing HMAS Adelaide during a multi-spot exercise in 2018. (Defence)

16 Comments

  • D S

    says:

    Apache for Australia, all our allies have the type it’s proven in the combat environment. Come on Boeing make it happen!

    • Steve

      says:

      Apaches aren’t designed from the ground up to be operated off ships, like our LHDs. My money is on the Viper.

      • peter jones

        says:

        Steve i believe the British version of the AH64 was navalised as standard,so that being the case it could be done for ours too if that was a prime requirement.

        Pete

  • Griffo

    says:

    Sick of all this defence spending on killing machines.

    • Craig

      says:

      Really? You don’t see any benefit in defending ourselves? We came so close to losing our freedom in 1942.

    • Scott

      says:

      Oh boo hoo. What should defense budgets be spent on?

  • Brad

    says:

    Should have selected the apache the first time

  • Hoss

    says:

    Hope you have a lot of time and money for maintenance! Because the Apache is in the hangar a lot more that in the air.
    Zulu’s fly all the time…and stay flying. When you only have 24…You would think that you would want them combat ready and flying all the time.

    • S

      says:

      Simply not true.

  • E. Powell

    says:

    Zulu Cobra, lowest maintenance, lowest parts count, and longest lasting rotors available. Aussie’s will most certainly not be disappointed with the snake! U.S. Marine Corps will be using them for a long time for many Pacific Ops to come. It would be great to team up with the Aussie’s on Cobra missions.

  • G4George

    says:

    Watch the civilians in Canberra pick the tender that will cost the most and deliver least….. they have a record of spending our money on below par defence assets and will do it well into the future, yep…. they will go with the Tiger.

  • PAUL

    says:

    Yes get them & sell the Tigers to NZ

  • Julian

    says:

    The Apache is a formidable weapons platform with proven form. My opinion is the Bell Viper appears to be the best fit to cover the needs of the RAN and Army. In saying that, US President D. Trump will most likely apply a fair bit of pressure for the ADF to buy the Apache due to his close association with Boeing and also to assist their sales after the 737-MAX disaster that has cost them around $1 billion per month.

  • Truth Hurts

    says:

    Anything but the Tiger rubbish. Though you can probably guarantee that they will pick the Tiger as someone will have a vested interest in a marginal seat.

  • taxpayer

    says:

    Surely we cannot be thinking of buying Apache’s!
    The US Army will have retired them when ours are reaching midlife, the US Apache replacement (FARA) has a planned IOC of 2028, the same as what the ADF is proposing. Please let us not also forget that the Tiger was purchased to replace the Kiowa as a reconnaissance helicopter, we never had a requirement for an attack helicopter.
    This purchase reeks of too many exchange officers returning from the USA and wanting Australia to be just like American military.

  • [ ]

    says:

    why not build a attack helicopter in Australia, we are buying stuff that is manufactured oversea`s, then spending millions, even billions suiting the thing we just brought from the US, it would be easier making a vehicle in Australia for our military needs, different country`s have different military needs, we got ours, they got theirs, making something in Australia would be a very iconic thing.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Boeing submits AH-64E for Project LAND 4503 helicopter replacement

written by australianaviation.com.au | September 4, 2019
A file image of an AH-64D Apache, a contender for Project LAND 4503, at Exercise Talisman Saber 2019. (Defence)
A file image of an AH-64D Apache, a contender for Project LAND 4503, at Exercise Talisman Saber 2019. (Defence)

Boeing has put forward its AH-64E Apache in response to the Australian government’s Project LAND 4503 armed reconnaissance helicopter (ARH) replacement request for information (RFI).

Meanwhile, Bell has talked up up its AH-1Z “Viper” helicopter as a potential replacement for the Australian Army’s Tiger ARH. However, the company stopped short of confirming it had made a submission.

Boeing said it a statement on August 30 2019 it had put forward its AH-64E Guardian Apache attack helicopter to replace the Australian Army’s fleet of 22 Airbus Helicopters Tiger ARH.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“Australia would not only benefit from the AH-64’s mission capabilities, it would also enjoy its technological and strategic advantages against adversary aircraft; a global parts and supply network and a domestic training, support and sustainment team,” Boeing said.

The AH-64E is the latest version of the AH-64D Longbow Apache, and features an enhanced combat system and the ability to be integrated with unmanned systems.

The United States, United Kingdom, India, Indonesia, Taiwan, among others, have committed to buying the AH-64E. The aircraft offered the ability to integrate with US and other regional forces in combined operations.

“Boeing’s AH-64E Apache is known for its survivability, sustainability, interoperability and reconnaissance capability,” Terry Jamison from Boeing Global Sales and Marketing, Defense, Space and Security said

PROMOTED CONTENT

“As an Apache operator, Australia would join coalition countries, including the US and UK, and regional partners Singapore, Indonesia, Japan and the Republic of Korea.”

Boeing Defence Australia vice president and managing director Darren Edwards added: “The benefits of Apache for Australia are more significant than continued platform upgrades. Boeing plans to deliver support services in-country and engage local suppliers to maximise Australian industry involvement for the ARH replacement program.”

The US Army has a planned ongoing upgrade program which will see the AH-64E serve into the 2040s, and Boeing said Australia could stay in lockstep with that program to ensure it had the latest capabilities as they were rolled out across a larger fleet.

Project LAND 4503 sought a total of 29 airframes to replace the 22 Tigers. It specified that 24 aircraft would be operational at a single location and five airframes will be assigned to training.

Designed to “deliver armed reconnaissance efforts in close and deep contested battlespace”, the RFI called for an initial operational capability (IOC) of one squadron of 12 aircraft in 2026, and a fully operational capability (FOC) to follow in 2028.

It states that at IOC Army would be able to operationally deploy a troop of four aircraft. At FOC, Army would be capable of generating 12 aircraft for deployment while maintaining a training system of five aircraft.

Two Apaches from the United States Army’s 6th Cavalry Regiment during a joint exercise with Australian forces. (Defence)
Two Apaches from the United States Army’s 6th Cavalry Regiment during a joint exercise with Australian forces. (Defence)

Bell highlights proven AH-1Z Viper suitability for Project LAND 4503

Meanwhile, Bell has extolled the virtues of its AH-1Z “Viper” helicopter as a potential replacement for the Australian Army’s Tiger ARH.

Although the company did not directly confirm it had responded to the LAND 4503 armed reconnaissance helicopter replacement RFI which closed on August 30, the company issued a statement listing the capability and performance attributes of the AH-1Z, which neatly align with those of the RFI.

“The combat proven Bell AH-1Z Viper is the only marinised attack helicopter in the world that is specifically designed and built for expeditionary and maritime operations,” the Bell statement said.

“Marinisation is more than just corrosion protection against saltwater. Unlike unproven and costly add-ons, Bell’s marinisation begins at aircraft design and is built into the aircraft at point of manufacture to insure conformity to shipboard operations.”

The Bell AH-1Z Viper is a potential manned replacement for the Tiger. (Defence)
The Bell AH-1Z Viper is a potential manned replacement for the Tiger. (Defence)

The company said the marinisation process also included the AH-1Z’s composite rotor blades and yoke style main rotor hubs which significantly outperformed legacy “strap-pack” type systems that were prone to corrosion and failure.

The AH-1Z, “also includes semi-automatic blade folding for quick stowage either on board ship or for rapid C-17 deployment, rotor brakes, ease of maintenance, electromagnetic environmental effects (E3) hardening which provides safety against the ship’s powerful radars and other sensors from interfering with aircraft onboard weapons and systems”.

The company also noted the Viper’s commonality with those helicopters operated by the US Marine Corps, some of which were based in Australia on regular rotations to the Northern Territory, as well as being permanently deployed to the wider region.

Bell’s statement effectively confirmed the LAND 4503 project would be a race between three contenders – the AH-1Z, Boeing’s AH-64E Guardian Apache, and a significantly upgraded Tiger ARH offered by Airbus Helicopters.

A United States Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper helicopter departing HMAS Adelaide during a multi-spot exercise in 2018. (Defence)
A United States Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper helicopter departing HMAS Adelaide during a multi-spot exercise in 2018. (Defence)

16 Comments

  • D S

    says:

    Apache for Australia, all our allies have the type it’s proven in the combat environment. Come on Boeing make it happen!

    • Steve

      says:

      Apaches aren’t designed from the ground up to be operated off ships, like our LHDs. My money is on the Viper.

      • peter jones

        says:

        Steve i believe the British version of the AH64 was navalised as standard,so that being the case it could be done for ours too if that was a prime requirement.

        Pete

  • Griffo

    says:

    Sick of all this defence spending on killing machines.

    • Craig

      says:

      Really? You don’t see any benefit in defending ourselves? We came so close to losing our freedom in 1942.

    • Scott

      says:

      Oh boo hoo. What should defense budgets be spent on?

  • Brad

    says:

    Should have selected the apache the first time

  • Hoss

    says:

    Hope you have a lot of time and money for maintenance! Because the Apache is in the hangar a lot more that in the air.
    Zulu’s fly all the time…and stay flying. When you only have 24…You would think that you would want them combat ready and flying all the time.

    • S

      says:

      Simply not true.

  • E. Powell

    says:

    Zulu Cobra, lowest maintenance, lowest parts count, and longest lasting rotors available. Aussie’s will most certainly not be disappointed with the snake! U.S. Marine Corps will be using them for a long time for many Pacific Ops to come. It would be great to team up with the Aussie’s on Cobra missions.

  • G4George

    says:

    Watch the civilians in Canberra pick the tender that will cost the most and deliver least….. they have a record of spending our money on below par defence assets and will do it well into the future, yep…. they will go with the Tiger.

  • PAUL

    says:

    Yes get them & sell the Tigers to NZ

  • Julian

    says:

    The Apache is a formidable weapons platform with proven form. My opinion is the Bell Viper appears to be the best fit to cover the needs of the RAN and Army. In saying that, US President D. Trump will most likely apply a fair bit of pressure for the ADF to buy the Apache due to his close association with Boeing and also to assist their sales after the 737-MAX disaster that has cost them around $1 billion per month.

  • Truth Hurts

    says:

    Anything but the Tiger rubbish. Though you can probably guarantee that they will pick the Tiger as someone will have a vested interest in a marginal seat.

  • taxpayer

    says:

    Surely we cannot be thinking of buying Apache’s!
    The US Army will have retired them when ours are reaching midlife, the US Apache replacement (FARA) has a planned IOC of 2028, the same as what the ADF is proposing. Please let us not also forget that the Tiger was purchased to replace the Kiowa as a reconnaissance helicopter, we never had a requirement for an attack helicopter.
    This purchase reeks of too many exchange officers returning from the USA and wanting Australia to be just like American military.

  • [ ]

    says:

    why not build a attack helicopter in Australia, we are buying stuff that is manufactured oversea`s, then spending millions, even billions suiting the thing we just brought from the US, it would be easier making a vehicle in Australia for our military needs, different country`s have different military needs, we got ours, they got theirs, making something in Australia would be a very iconic thing.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Boeing submits AH-64E for Project LAND 4503 helicopter replacement

written by australianaviation.com.au | September 4, 2019
A file image of an AH-64D Apache, a contender for Project LAND 4503, at Exercise Talisman Saber 2019. (Defence)
A file image of an AH-64D Apache, a contender for Project LAND 4503, at Exercise Talisman Saber 2019. (Defence)

Boeing has put forward its AH-64E Apache in response to the Australian government’s Project LAND 4503 armed reconnaissance helicopter (ARH) replacement request for information (RFI).

Meanwhile, Bell has talked up up its AH-1Z “Viper” helicopter as a potential replacement for the Australian Army’s Tiger ARH. However, the company stopped short of confirming it had made a submission.

Boeing said it a statement on August 30 2019 it had put forward its AH-64E Guardian Apache attack helicopter to replace the Australian Army’s fleet of 22 Airbus Helicopters Tiger ARH.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“Australia would not only benefit from the AH-64’s mission capabilities, it would also enjoy its technological and strategic advantages against adversary aircraft; a global parts and supply network and a domestic training, support and sustainment team,” Boeing said.

The AH-64E is the latest version of the AH-64D Longbow Apache, and features an enhanced combat system and the ability to be integrated with unmanned systems.

The United States, United Kingdom, India, Indonesia, Taiwan, among others, have committed to buying the AH-64E. The aircraft offered the ability to integrate with US and other regional forces in combined operations.

“Boeing’s AH-64E Apache is known for its survivability, sustainability, interoperability and reconnaissance capability,” Terry Jamison from Boeing Global Sales and Marketing, Defense, Space and Security said

PROMOTED CONTENT

“As an Apache operator, Australia would join coalition countries, including the US and UK, and regional partners Singapore, Indonesia, Japan and the Republic of Korea.”

Boeing Defence Australia vice president and managing director Darren Edwards added: “The benefits of Apache for Australia are more significant than continued platform upgrades. Boeing plans to deliver support services in-country and engage local suppliers to maximise Australian industry involvement for the ARH replacement program.”

The US Army has a planned ongoing upgrade program which will see the AH-64E serve into the 2040s, and Boeing said Australia could stay in lockstep with that program to ensure it had the latest capabilities as they were rolled out across a larger fleet.

Project LAND 4503 sought a total of 29 airframes to replace the 22 Tigers. It specified that 24 aircraft would be operational at a single location and five airframes will be assigned to training.

Designed to “deliver armed reconnaissance efforts in close and deep contested battlespace”, the RFI called for an initial operational capability (IOC) of one squadron of 12 aircraft in 2026, and a fully operational capability (FOC) to follow in 2028.

It states that at IOC Army would be able to operationally deploy a troop of four aircraft. At FOC, Army would be capable of generating 12 aircraft for deployment while maintaining a training system of five aircraft.

Two Apaches from the United States Army’s 6th Cavalry Regiment during a joint exercise with Australian forces. (Defence)
Two Apaches from the United States Army’s 6th Cavalry Regiment during a joint exercise with Australian forces. (Defence)

Bell highlights proven AH-1Z Viper suitability for Project LAND 4503

Meanwhile, Bell has extolled the virtues of its AH-1Z “Viper” helicopter as a potential replacement for the Australian Army’s Tiger ARH.

Although the company did not directly confirm it had responded to the LAND 4503 armed reconnaissance helicopter replacement RFI which closed on August 30, the company issued a statement listing the capability and performance attributes of the AH-1Z, which neatly align with those of the RFI.

“The combat proven Bell AH-1Z Viper is the only marinised attack helicopter in the world that is specifically designed and built for expeditionary and maritime operations,” the Bell statement said.

“Marinisation is more than just corrosion protection against saltwater. Unlike unproven and costly add-ons, Bell’s marinisation begins at aircraft design and is built into the aircraft at point of manufacture to insure conformity to shipboard operations.”

The Bell AH-1Z Viper is a potential manned replacement for the Tiger. (Defence)
The Bell AH-1Z Viper is a potential manned replacement for the Tiger. (Defence)

The company said the marinisation process also included the AH-1Z’s composite rotor blades and yoke style main rotor hubs which significantly outperformed legacy “strap-pack” type systems that were prone to corrosion and failure.

The AH-1Z, “also includes semi-automatic blade folding for quick stowage either on board ship or for rapid C-17 deployment, rotor brakes, ease of maintenance, electromagnetic environmental effects (E3) hardening which provides safety against the ship’s powerful radars and other sensors from interfering with aircraft onboard weapons and systems”.

The company also noted the Viper’s commonality with those helicopters operated by the US Marine Corps, some of which were based in Australia on regular rotations to the Northern Territory, as well as being permanently deployed to the wider region.

Bell’s statement effectively confirmed the LAND 4503 project would be a race between three contenders – the AH-1Z, Boeing’s AH-64E Guardian Apache, and a significantly upgraded Tiger ARH offered by Airbus Helicopters.

A United States Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper helicopter departing HMAS Adelaide during a multi-spot exercise in 2018. (Defence)
A United States Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper helicopter departing HMAS Adelaide during a multi-spot exercise in 2018. (Defence)

16 Comments

  • D S

    says:

    Apache for Australia, all our allies have the type it’s proven in the combat environment. Come on Boeing make it happen!

    • Steve

      says:

      Apaches aren’t designed from the ground up to be operated off ships, like our LHDs. My money is on the Viper.

      • peter jones

        says:

        Steve i believe the British version of the AH64 was navalised as standard,so that being the case it could be done for ours too if that was a prime requirement.

        Pete

  • Griffo

    says:

    Sick of all this defence spending on killing machines.

    • Craig

      says:

      Really? You don’t see any benefit in defending ourselves? We came so close to losing our freedom in 1942.

    • Scott

      says:

      Oh boo hoo. What should defense budgets be spent on?

  • Brad

    says:

    Should have selected the apache the first time

  • Hoss

    says:

    Hope you have a lot of time and money for maintenance! Because the Apache is in the hangar a lot more that in the air.
    Zulu’s fly all the time…and stay flying. When you only have 24…You would think that you would want them combat ready and flying all the time.

    • S

      says:

      Simply not true.

  • E. Powell

    says:

    Zulu Cobra, lowest maintenance, lowest parts count, and longest lasting rotors available. Aussie’s will most certainly not be disappointed with the snake! U.S. Marine Corps will be using them for a long time for many Pacific Ops to come. It would be great to team up with the Aussie’s on Cobra missions.

  • G4George

    says:

    Watch the civilians in Canberra pick the tender that will cost the most and deliver least….. they have a record of spending our money on below par defence assets and will do it well into the future, yep…. they will go with the Tiger.

  • PAUL

    says:

    Yes get them & sell the Tigers to NZ

  • Julian

    says:

    The Apache is a formidable weapons platform with proven form. My opinion is the Bell Viper appears to be the best fit to cover the needs of the RAN and Army. In saying that, US President D. Trump will most likely apply a fair bit of pressure for the ADF to buy the Apache due to his close association with Boeing and also to assist their sales after the 737-MAX disaster that has cost them around $1 billion per month.

  • Truth Hurts

    says:

    Anything but the Tiger rubbish. Though you can probably guarantee that they will pick the Tiger as someone will have a vested interest in a marginal seat.

  • taxpayer

    says:

    Surely we cannot be thinking of buying Apache’s!
    The US Army will have retired them when ours are reaching midlife, the US Apache replacement (FARA) has a planned IOC of 2028, the same as what the ADF is proposing. Please let us not also forget that the Tiger was purchased to replace the Kiowa as a reconnaissance helicopter, we never had a requirement for an attack helicopter.
    This purchase reeks of too many exchange officers returning from the USA and wanting Australia to be just like American military.

  • [ ]

    says:

    why not build a attack helicopter in Australia, we are buying stuff that is manufactured oversea`s, then spending millions, even billions suiting the thing we just brought from the US, it would be easier making a vehicle in Australia for our military needs, different country`s have different military needs, we got ours, they got theirs, making something in Australia would be a very iconic thing.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Boeing submits AH-64E for Project LAND 4503 helicopter replacement

written by australianaviation.com.au | September 4, 2019
A file image of an AH-64D Apache, a contender for Project LAND 4503, at Exercise Talisman Saber 2019. (Defence)
A file image of an AH-64D Apache, a contender for Project LAND 4503, at Exercise Talisman Saber 2019. (Defence)

Boeing has put forward its AH-64E Apache in response to the Australian government’s Project LAND 4503 armed reconnaissance helicopter (ARH) replacement request for information (RFI).

Meanwhile, Bell has talked up up its AH-1Z “Viper” helicopter as a potential replacement for the Australian Army’s Tiger ARH. However, the company stopped short of confirming it had made a submission.

Boeing said it a statement on August 30 2019 it had put forward its AH-64E Guardian Apache attack helicopter to replace the Australian Army’s fleet of 22 Airbus Helicopters Tiger ARH.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“Australia would not only benefit from the AH-64’s mission capabilities, it would also enjoy its technological and strategic advantages against adversary aircraft; a global parts and supply network and a domestic training, support and sustainment team,” Boeing said.

The AH-64E is the latest version of the AH-64D Longbow Apache, and features an enhanced combat system and the ability to be integrated with unmanned systems.

The United States, United Kingdom, India, Indonesia, Taiwan, among others, have committed to buying the AH-64E. The aircraft offered the ability to integrate with US and other regional forces in combined operations.

“Boeing’s AH-64E Apache is known for its survivability, sustainability, interoperability and reconnaissance capability,” Terry Jamison from Boeing Global Sales and Marketing, Defense, Space and Security said

PROMOTED CONTENT

“As an Apache operator, Australia would join coalition countries, including the US and UK, and regional partners Singapore, Indonesia, Japan and the Republic of Korea.”

Boeing Defence Australia vice president and managing director Darren Edwards added: “The benefits of Apache for Australia are more significant than continued platform upgrades. Boeing plans to deliver support services in-country and engage local suppliers to maximise Australian industry involvement for the ARH replacement program.”

The US Army has a planned ongoing upgrade program which will see the AH-64E serve into the 2040s, and Boeing said Australia could stay in lockstep with that program to ensure it had the latest capabilities as they were rolled out across a larger fleet.

Project LAND 4503 sought a total of 29 airframes to replace the 22 Tigers. It specified that 24 aircraft would be operational at a single location and five airframes will be assigned to training.

Designed to “deliver armed reconnaissance efforts in close and deep contested battlespace”, the RFI called for an initial operational capability (IOC) of one squadron of 12 aircraft in 2026, and a fully operational capability (FOC) to follow in 2028.

It states that at IOC Army would be able to operationally deploy a troop of four aircraft. At FOC, Army would be capable of generating 12 aircraft for deployment while maintaining a training system of five aircraft.

Two Apaches from the United States Army’s 6th Cavalry Regiment during a joint exercise with Australian forces. (Defence)
Two Apaches from the United States Army’s 6th Cavalry Regiment during a joint exercise with Australian forces. (Defence)

Bell highlights proven AH-1Z Viper suitability for Project LAND 4503

Meanwhile, Bell has extolled the virtues of its AH-1Z “Viper” helicopter as a potential replacement for the Australian Army’s Tiger ARH.

Although the company did not directly confirm it had responded to the LAND 4503 armed reconnaissance helicopter replacement RFI which closed on August 30, the company issued a statement listing the capability and performance attributes of the AH-1Z, which neatly align with those of the RFI.

“The combat proven Bell AH-1Z Viper is the only marinised attack helicopter in the world that is specifically designed and built for expeditionary and maritime operations,” the Bell statement said.

“Marinisation is more than just corrosion protection against saltwater. Unlike unproven and costly add-ons, Bell’s marinisation begins at aircraft design and is built into the aircraft at point of manufacture to insure conformity to shipboard operations.”

The Bell AH-1Z Viper is a potential manned replacement for the Tiger. (Defence)
The Bell AH-1Z Viper is a potential manned replacement for the Tiger. (Defence)

The company said the marinisation process also included the AH-1Z’s composite rotor blades and yoke style main rotor hubs which significantly outperformed legacy “strap-pack” type systems that were prone to corrosion and failure.

The AH-1Z, “also includes semi-automatic blade folding for quick stowage either on board ship or for rapid C-17 deployment, rotor brakes, ease of maintenance, electromagnetic environmental effects (E3) hardening which provides safety against the ship’s powerful radars and other sensors from interfering with aircraft onboard weapons and systems”.

The company also noted the Viper’s commonality with those helicopters operated by the US Marine Corps, some of which were based in Australia on regular rotations to the Northern Territory, as well as being permanently deployed to the wider region.

Bell’s statement effectively confirmed the LAND 4503 project would be a race between three contenders – the AH-1Z, Boeing’s AH-64E Guardian Apache, and a significantly upgraded Tiger ARH offered by Airbus Helicopters.

A United States Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper helicopter departing HMAS Adelaide during a multi-spot exercise in 2018. (Defence)
A United States Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper helicopter departing HMAS Adelaide during a multi-spot exercise in 2018. (Defence)

16 Comments

  • D S

    says:

    Apache for Australia, all our allies have the type it’s proven in the combat environment. Come on Boeing make it happen!

    • Steve

      says:

      Apaches aren’t designed from the ground up to be operated off ships, like our LHDs. My money is on the Viper.

      • peter jones

        says:

        Steve i believe the British version of the AH64 was navalised as standard,so that being the case it could be done for ours too if that was a prime requirement.

        Pete

  • Griffo

    says:

    Sick of all this defence spending on killing machines.

    • Craig

      says:

      Really? You don’t see any benefit in defending ourselves? We came so close to losing our freedom in 1942.

    • Scott

      says:

      Oh boo hoo. What should defense budgets be spent on?

  • Brad

    says:

    Should have selected the apache the first time

  • Hoss

    says:

    Hope you have a lot of time and money for maintenance! Because the Apache is in the hangar a lot more that in the air.
    Zulu’s fly all the time…and stay flying. When you only have 24…You would think that you would want them combat ready and flying all the time.

    • S

      says:

      Simply not true.

  • E. Powell

    says:

    Zulu Cobra, lowest maintenance, lowest parts count, and longest lasting rotors available. Aussie’s will most certainly not be disappointed with the snake! U.S. Marine Corps will be using them for a long time for many Pacific Ops to come. It would be great to team up with the Aussie’s on Cobra missions.

  • G4George

    says:

    Watch the civilians in Canberra pick the tender that will cost the most and deliver least….. they have a record of spending our money on below par defence assets and will do it well into the future, yep…. they will go with the Tiger.

  • PAUL

    says:

    Yes get them & sell the Tigers to NZ

  • Julian

    says:

    The Apache is a formidable weapons platform with proven form. My opinion is the Bell Viper appears to be the best fit to cover the needs of the RAN and Army. In saying that, US President D. Trump will most likely apply a fair bit of pressure for the ADF to buy the Apache due to his close association with Boeing and also to assist their sales after the 737-MAX disaster that has cost them around $1 billion per month.

  • Truth Hurts

    says:

    Anything but the Tiger rubbish. Though you can probably guarantee that they will pick the Tiger as someone will have a vested interest in a marginal seat.

  • taxpayer

    says:

    Surely we cannot be thinking of buying Apache’s!
    The US Army will have retired them when ours are reaching midlife, the US Apache replacement (FARA) has a planned IOC of 2028, the same as what the ADF is proposing. Please let us not also forget that the Tiger was purchased to replace the Kiowa as a reconnaissance helicopter, we never had a requirement for an attack helicopter.
    This purchase reeks of too many exchange officers returning from the USA and wanting Australia to be just like American military.

  • [ ]

    says:

    why not build a attack helicopter in Australia, we are buying stuff that is manufactured oversea`s, then spending millions, even billions suiting the thing we just brought from the US, it would be easier making a vehicle in Australia for our military needs, different country`s have different military needs, we got ours, they got theirs, making something in Australia would be a very iconic thing.

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Boeing submits AH-64E for Project LAND 4503 helicopter replacement

written by australianaviation.com.au | September 4, 2019
A file image of an AH-64D Apache, a contender for Project LAND 4503, at Exercise Talisman Saber 2019. (Defence)
A file image of an AH-64D Apache, a contender for Project LAND 4503, at Exercise Talisman Saber 2019. (Defence)

Boeing has put forward its AH-64E Apache in response to the Australian government’s Project LAND 4503 armed reconnaissance helicopter (ARH) replacement request for information (RFI).

Meanwhile, Bell has talked up up its AH-1Z “Viper” helicopter as a potential replacement for the Australian Army’s Tiger ARH. However, the company stopped short of confirming it had made a submission.

Boeing said it a statement on August 30 2019 it had put forward its AH-64E Guardian Apache attack helicopter to replace the Australian Army’s fleet of 22 Airbus Helicopters Tiger ARH.

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“Australia would not only benefit from the AH-64’s mission capabilities, it would also enjoy its technological and strategic advantages against adversary aircraft; a global parts and supply network and a domestic training, support and sustainment team,” Boeing said.

The AH-64E is the latest version of the AH-64D Longbow Apache, and features an enhanced combat system and the ability to be integrated with unmanned systems.

The United States, United Kingdom, India, Indonesia, Taiwan, among others, have committed to buying the AH-64E. The aircraft offered the ability to integrate with US and other regional forces in combined operations.

“Boeing’s AH-64E Apache is known for its survivability, sustainability, interoperability and reconnaissance capability,” Terry Jamison from Boeing Global Sales and Marketing, Defense, Space and Security said

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“As an Apache operator, Australia would join coalition countries, including the US and UK, and regional partners Singapore, Indonesia, Japan and the Republic of Korea.”

Boeing Defence Australia vice president and managing director Darren Edwards added: “The benefits of Apache for Australia are more significant than continued platform upgrades. Boeing plans to deliver support services in-country and engage local suppliers to maximise Australian industry involvement for the ARH replacement program.”

The US Army has a planned ongoing upgrade program which will see the AH-64E serve into the 2040s, and Boeing said Australia could stay in lockstep with that program to ensure it had the latest capabilities as they were rolled out across a larger fleet.

Project LAND 4503 sought a total of 29 airframes to replace the 22 Tigers. It specified that 24 aircraft would be operational at a single location and five airframes will be assigned to training.

Designed to “deliver armed reconnaissance efforts in close and deep contested battlespace”, the RFI called for an initial operational capability (IOC) of one squadron of 12 aircraft in 2026, and a fully operational capability (FOC) to follow in 2028.

It states that at IOC Army would be able to operationally deploy a troop of four aircraft. At FOC, Army would be capable of generating 12 aircraft for deployment while maintaining a training system of five aircraft.

Two Apaches from the United States Army’s 6th Cavalry Regiment during a joint exercise with Australian forces. (Defence)
Two Apaches from the United States Army’s 6th Cavalry Regiment during a joint exercise with Australian forces. (Defence)

Bell highlights proven AH-1Z Viper suitability for Project LAND 4503

Meanwhile, Bell has extolled the virtues of its AH-1Z “Viper” helicopter as a potential replacement for the Australian Army’s Tiger ARH.

Although the company did not directly confirm it had responded to the LAND 4503 armed reconnaissance helicopter replacement RFI which closed on August 30, the company issued a statement listing the capability and performance attributes of the AH-1Z, which neatly align with those of the RFI.

“The combat proven Bell AH-1Z Viper is the only marinised attack helicopter in the world that is specifically designed and built for expeditionary and maritime operations,” the Bell statement said.

“Marinisation is more than just corrosion protection against saltwater. Unlike unproven and costly add-ons, Bell’s marinisation begins at aircraft design and is built into the aircraft at point of manufacture to insure conformity to shipboard operations.”

The Bell AH-1Z Viper is a potential manned replacement for the Tiger. (Defence)
The Bell AH-1Z Viper is a potential manned replacement for the Tiger. (Defence)

The company said the marinisation process also included the AH-1Z’s composite rotor blades and yoke style main rotor hubs which significantly outperformed legacy “strap-pack” type systems that were prone to corrosion and failure.

The AH-1Z, “also includes semi-automatic blade folding for quick stowage either on board ship or for rapid C-17 deployment, rotor brakes, ease of maintenance, electromagnetic environmental effects (E3) hardening which provides safety against the ship’s powerful radars and other sensors from interfering with aircraft onboard weapons and systems”.

The company also noted the Viper’s commonality with those helicopters operated by the US Marine Corps, some of which were based in Australia on regular rotations to the Northern Territory, as well as being permanently deployed to the wider region.

Bell’s statement effectively confirmed the LAND 4503 project would be a race between three contenders – the AH-1Z, Boeing’s AH-64E Guardian Apache, and a significantly upgraded Tiger ARH offered by Airbus Helicopters.

A United States Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper helicopter departing HMAS Adelaide during a multi-spot exercise in 2018. (Defence)
A United States Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper helicopter departing HMAS Adelaide during a multi-spot exercise in 2018. (Defence)

16 Comments

  • D S

    says:

    Apache for Australia, all our allies have the type it’s proven in the combat environment. Come on Boeing make it happen!

    • Steve

      says:

      Apaches aren’t designed from the ground up to be operated off ships, like our LHDs. My money is on the Viper.

      • peter jones

        says:

        Steve i believe the British version of the AH64 was navalised as standard,so that being the case it could be done for ours too if that was a prime requirement.

        Pete

  • Griffo

    says:

    Sick of all this defence spending on killing machines.

    • Craig

      says:

      Really? You don’t see any benefit in defending ourselves? We came so close to losing our freedom in 1942.

    • Scott

      says:

      Oh boo hoo. What should defense budgets be spent on?

  • Brad

    says:

    Should have selected the apache the first time

  • Hoss

    says:

    Hope you have a lot of time and money for maintenance! Because the Apache is in the hangar a lot more that in the air.
    Zulu’s fly all the time…and stay flying. When you only have 24…You would think that you would want them combat ready and flying all the time.

    • S

      says:

      Simply not true.

  • E. Powell

    says:

    Zulu Cobra, lowest maintenance, lowest parts count, and longest lasting rotors available. Aussie’s will most certainly not be disappointed with the snake! U.S. Marine Corps will be using them for a long time for many Pacific Ops to come. It would be great to team up with the Aussie’s on Cobra missions.

  • G4George

    says:

    Watch the civilians in Canberra pick the tender that will cost the most and deliver least….. they have a record of spending our money on below par defence assets and will do it well into the future, yep…. they will go with the Tiger.

  • PAUL

    says:

    Yes get them & sell the Tigers to NZ

  • Julian

    says:

    The Apache is a formidable weapons platform with proven form. My opinion is the Bell Viper appears to be the best fit to cover the needs of the RAN and Army. In saying that, US President D. Trump will most likely apply a fair bit of pressure for the ADF to buy the Apache due to his close association with Boeing and also to assist their sales after the 737-MAX disaster that has cost them around $1 billion per month.

  • Truth Hurts

    says:

    Anything but the Tiger rubbish. Though you can probably guarantee that they will pick the Tiger as someone will have a vested interest in a marginal seat.

  • taxpayer

    says:

    Surely we cannot be thinking of buying Apache’s!
    The US Army will have retired them when ours are reaching midlife, the US Apache replacement (FARA) has a planned IOC of 2028, the same as what the ADF is proposing. Please let us not also forget that the Tiger was purchased to replace the Kiowa as a reconnaissance helicopter, we never had a requirement for an attack helicopter.
    This purchase reeks of too many exchange officers returning from the USA and wanting Australia to be just like American military.

  • [ ]

    says:

    why not build a attack helicopter in Australia, we are buying stuff that is manufactured oversea`s, then spending millions, even billions suiting the thing we just brought from the US, it would be easier making a vehicle in Australia for our military needs, different country`s have different military needs, we got ours, they got theirs, making something in Australia would be a very iconic thing.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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