USQ launches new flight simulator

written by australianaviation.com.au | October 29, 2017
USQ Vice-Chancellor Professor Geraldine Mackenzie (right) and USQ Aviation student Mardy Tritton in the University’s new flight simulator. (USQ)

Aviation students at the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) can now train on a modern, $1 million flying training device which faithfully replicates a Boeing 737-800.

The 737 simulator was officially launched at USQ’s Springfield campus, located about 45 minutes south-west of the Brisbane CBD by car, on Friday.

USQ vice-chancellor Professor Geraldine Mackenzie said the device would be utilised by the USQ Bachelor of Aviation program.

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“Featuring the most up-to-date equipment and technology in the world, the simulator provides our aviation students with the most realistic multi-crew simulated training in an aircraft cockpit, putting us at the cutting edge of aviation,” Prof Mackenzie said in a statement.

“Our students also operate the simulator in the first year of their degree which is not available anywhere else in the country.

USQ said the new simulator would be the only one of its type in Queensland.

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2 Comments

  • Paul

    says:

    Congratulations USQ!

  • random

    says:

    If only this existed 25 years ago in the universities environment in Australia. Aviation degrees would not have been the illegitimate backwater that they were for a period in the early-mid 1990s – when many airlines didn’t give much credence to them as a pathway into employment.

    In that era, if one wasn’t a graduate of in-house airline training, then one needed to have suffered through GA or resigned from the military. Many university aviation courses were unfortunately considered to be an untrustworthy pathway.

    It appears that the coordination between universities and the broader industry has improved significantly in that intervening time. It was odd that the airlines were not even interested in trawling universities in Australia for potential aircrew.

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