Close sidebar

RAAF’s AOSG becomes Air Warfare Centre

written by australianaviation.com.au | March 7, 2016
The newly unveiled ‘Air Warfare Centre' (AWC) sign outside the AWC Headquarters at RAAF Base Edinburgh.
Signage for the newly-opened Air Warfare Centre.

The RAAF has formally stood up the Air Warfare Centre, a key element of its Plan Jericho transformation plan, during a ceremony at RAAF Base Edinburgh on February 25.

Air Warfare Centre (AWC) replaces the former Aerospace Operational Support Group (or AOSG) and achieved an initial operational capability (IOC) on January 11.

“The future of the AWC is as dynamic as it is exciting. Importantly, you will have a key role to play in the transformation of the Air Force in the future,” AWC commander Air Commodore Stephen Meredith said at the ceremony.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“The RAAF AWC is a first for Air Force and is an extremely exciting opportunity not only for my staff but for the wider Australian Defence Organisation.”

The old AOSG comprised the Development and Test Wing and the Information Warfare Wing, and also had responsibility for the Woomera test range. In its place the new AWC is structured into directorates, comprising Integrated Mission Support, Capability and Logistics, Test and Evaluation, Information Warfare, Air Force Ranges, and Tactics and Training. Like AOSG, AWC’s headquarters and most of its units are based at RAAF Base Edinburgh.

“By working with the other force element groups, Army, Navy and defence industry, the AWC will allow Air Force to generate rapid, cogent and integrated capability solutions that are needed now and into the future,” Air Commander Australia Air Vice-Marshal Gavin Turnbull said at the opening.

“It will identify innovative solutions and translate those into capability by driving integrated tactics and advanced warfare across Air Command.”

PROMOTED CONTENT

The establishment of an air warfare centre was heralded by then Chief of Air Force Air Marshal Geoff Brown in his launch of Plan Jericho in February 2015.

The subsequent Plan Jericho ‘Program of Work’ document notes that: “Air Force lacks the systemic ability to generate rapid, cogent and integrated combat capability solutions in response to current and future capability gaps and bottom-up innovation opportunities.”

In response it promises that: “an Air Warfare Centre … will become the centre of innovation and thinking for integrated operations.”

Air Warfare Centre’s full operational capability (FOC) is scheduled for 2020.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

6 Comments

  • Not an Orion vertical – it’s a Canberra horizontal.

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Thanks Brendan, the meta data did say it was an Orion horizontal tail. We will check which aircraft it is from. Cheers

  • For quite a while now we have had a photograph of a pile of bits and pieces from an unknown Canberra at Woomera. We always suspected that it was one of the Canberra targets destroyed during the Karing Bomb trials back in the 80s. Thanks to Ben Hennessey they have been identified as being from A84-220. The tailplane has been salvaged and is now on display at the Air Warfare Centre at RAAF Edinburgh. One half is displayed outside (see photo) and the other half in the courtyard of the same building. (text from Martin Edwards)

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

RAAF’s AOSG becomes Air Warfare Centre

written by australianaviation.com.au | March 7, 2016
The newly unveiled ‘Air Warfare Centre' (AWC) sign outside the AWC Headquarters at RAAF Base Edinburgh.
Signage for the newly-opened Air Warfare Centre.

The RAAF has formally stood up the Air Warfare Centre, a key element of its Plan Jericho transformation plan, during a ceremony at RAAF Base Edinburgh on February 25.

Air Warfare Centre (AWC) replaces the former Aerospace Operational Support Group (or AOSG) and achieved an initial operational capability (IOC) on January 11.

“The future of the AWC is as dynamic as it is exciting. Importantly, you will have a key role to play in the transformation of the Air Force in the future,” AWC commander Air Commodore Stephen Meredith said at the ceremony.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“The RAAF AWC is a first for Air Force and is an extremely exciting opportunity not only for my staff but for the wider Australian Defence Organisation.”

The old AOSG comprised the Development and Test Wing and the Information Warfare Wing, and also had responsibility for the Woomera test range. In its place the new AWC is structured into directorates, comprising Integrated Mission Support, Capability and Logistics, Test and Evaluation, Information Warfare, Air Force Ranges, and Tactics and Training. Like AOSG, AWC’s headquarters and most of its units are based at RAAF Base Edinburgh.

“By working with the other force element groups, Army, Navy and defence industry, the AWC will allow Air Force to generate rapid, cogent and integrated capability solutions that are needed now and into the future,” Air Commander Australia Air Vice-Marshal Gavin Turnbull said at the opening.

“It will identify innovative solutions and translate those into capability by driving integrated tactics and advanced warfare across Air Command.”

PROMOTED CONTENT

The establishment of an air warfare centre was heralded by then Chief of Air Force Air Marshal Geoff Brown in his launch of Plan Jericho in February 2015.

The subsequent Plan Jericho ‘Program of Work’ document notes that: “Air Force lacks the systemic ability to generate rapid, cogent and integrated combat capability solutions in response to current and future capability gaps and bottom-up innovation opportunities.”

In response it promises that: “an Air Warfare Centre … will become the centre of innovation and thinking for integrated operations.”

Air Warfare Centre’s full operational capability (FOC) is scheduled for 2020.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

6 Comments

  • Not an Orion vertical – it’s a Canberra horizontal.

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Thanks Brendan, the meta data did say it was an Orion horizontal tail. We will check which aircraft it is from. Cheers

  • For quite a while now we have had a photograph of a pile of bits and pieces from an unknown Canberra at Woomera. We always suspected that it was one of the Canberra targets destroyed during the Karing Bomb trials back in the 80s. Thanks to Ben Hennessey they have been identified as being from A84-220. The tailplane has been salvaged and is now on display at the Air Warfare Centre at RAAF Edinburgh. One half is displayed outside (see photo) and the other half in the courtyard of the same building. (text from Martin Edwards)

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

RAAF’s AOSG becomes Air Warfare Centre

written by australianaviation.com.au | March 7, 2016
The newly unveiled ‘Air Warfare Centre' (AWC) sign outside the AWC Headquarters at RAAF Base Edinburgh.
Signage for the newly-opened Air Warfare Centre.

The RAAF has formally stood up the Air Warfare Centre, a key element of its Plan Jericho transformation plan, during a ceremony at RAAF Base Edinburgh on February 25.

Air Warfare Centre (AWC) replaces the former Aerospace Operational Support Group (or AOSG) and achieved an initial operational capability (IOC) on January 11.

“The future of the AWC is as dynamic as it is exciting. Importantly, you will have a key role to play in the transformation of the Air Force in the future,” AWC commander Air Commodore Stephen Meredith said at the ceremony.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“The RAAF AWC is a first for Air Force and is an extremely exciting opportunity not only for my staff but for the wider Australian Defence Organisation.”

The old AOSG comprised the Development and Test Wing and the Information Warfare Wing, and also had responsibility for the Woomera test range. In its place the new AWC is structured into directorates, comprising Integrated Mission Support, Capability and Logistics, Test and Evaluation, Information Warfare, Air Force Ranges, and Tactics and Training. Like AOSG, AWC’s headquarters and most of its units are based at RAAF Base Edinburgh.

“By working with the other force element groups, Army, Navy and defence industry, the AWC will allow Air Force to generate rapid, cogent and integrated capability solutions that are needed now and into the future,” Air Commander Australia Air Vice-Marshal Gavin Turnbull said at the opening.

“It will identify innovative solutions and translate those into capability by driving integrated tactics and advanced warfare across Air Command.”

PROMOTED CONTENT

The establishment of an air warfare centre was heralded by then Chief of Air Force Air Marshal Geoff Brown in his launch of Plan Jericho in February 2015.

The subsequent Plan Jericho ‘Program of Work’ document notes that: “Air Force lacks the systemic ability to generate rapid, cogent and integrated combat capability solutions in response to current and future capability gaps and bottom-up innovation opportunities.”

In response it promises that: “an Air Warfare Centre … will become the centre of innovation and thinking for integrated operations.”

Air Warfare Centre’s full operational capability (FOC) is scheduled for 2020.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

6 Comments

  • Not an Orion vertical – it’s a Canberra horizontal.

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Thanks Brendan, the meta data did say it was an Orion horizontal tail. We will check which aircraft it is from. Cheers

  • For quite a while now we have had a photograph of a pile of bits and pieces from an unknown Canberra at Woomera. We always suspected that it was one of the Canberra targets destroyed during the Karing Bomb trials back in the 80s. Thanks to Ben Hennessey they have been identified as being from A84-220. The tailplane has been salvaged and is now on display at the Air Warfare Centre at RAAF Edinburgh. One half is displayed outside (see photo) and the other half in the courtyard of the same building. (text from Martin Edwards)

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Each day, our subscribers are more informed with the right information.

SIGN UP to the Australian Aviation magazine for high-quality news and features for just $99.95 per year