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KC-30 uses its boom on operations for the first time

written by australianaviation.com.au | October 27, 2015

A Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) E-7A Wedgetail carries out the first operational air-to-air refuellilng from a RAAF KC-30A Multi-Role Tanker Transport aircraft on operations above Iraq.A RAAF KC-30A tanker transport has refuelled a RAAF E-7A Wedgetail AEW&C aircraft on operations for the first time.

The mission over Iraq in support of Coalition operations against Islamic State last week saw the KC-30 use its ARBS (Aerial Refuelling Boom System) to refuel the Wedgetail in the first time a RAAF KC-30 had used its boom on operations.

“Being able to use the KC-30A boom on operations to refuel an aircraft such as the Wedgetail is a force multiplier for Australian air power and Coalition air operations,” Commander of the Australian Air Task Group, Air Commodore Stuart Bellingham, said in a statement.

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“Proving this mode of air-to-air refuelling adds to the list of aircraft types that our KC-30A can now support, contributing to another in-demand capability of the coalition air campaign.”

The 17m long ARBS is capable of offloading fuel at a rate of 4,500 litres per minute.

“During this mission we transferred 34,750lb of fuel in about 15 minutes – the equivalent of refuelling 300 family sedans at a rate of less than three seconds per car,” the KC-30’s unnamed air refuelling operator said in the statement.

“We look forward to this becoming a normal part of our operations to assist the Wedgetail’s vital mission of providing airborne early warning, command and control above Iraq and Syria.”

PROMOTED CONTENT

The ARBS boom had a troubled early life – during flight testing a KC-30 bound for the RAAF lost its boom in an incident while refuelling a Portuguese F-16 in January 2011.

But the then Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) announced in March this year that the KC-30 project – AIR 5402 – had been removed from its Projects of Concern list, after an extensive development and testing program resolved issues with the ARBS.

The view from the cockpit of a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) E-7A Wedgetail Airborne Early Warning and Control aircraft as it approaches a RAAF KC-30 Multirole Tanker Transport aircraft in the sky over northern Iraq. Clearly visible is the extended probe of the tanker’s refuelling boom, which features the latest technology available for this difficult operation. This rendezvous was a historic occasion, marking the first air-to-air refuelling of a RAAF aircraft in combat using the KC-30’s tail boom refuelling probe. The refuelling mission resulted in the flawless transfer of nearly 35,000 pounds of fuel from the tanker, allowing the E-7A to remain airborne for over 12 hours.

 

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

7 Comments

  • Allan

    says:

    Good to see, The RAAF can finally be more independent of coalition tanker assets when able to call on one of our own. Looks like all the trials and tribulations have been worthwhile. Well done to all involved.

  • Pontious

    says:

    Good piccy but probably won’t go up on the Boeing website!

  • Greg Alexander

    says:

    I was the E-7A production engineer, and am now KC-30A Reliability Engineer and am very proud of the efforts of all involved (Defence and Contractor collaboration) and the great work done to enable this capability for the ADF.

  • TrashHauler

    says:

    Not every day you get a big Airbus and Boeing flying formation together

  • Daryl

    says:

    Great to see the RAAF with all this nifty new kit.Watched one of the KC30’s flying several oval tracks out over south/central Qld on Monday afternoon on flightradar24.Why do the KC’s us a transponder ,but no other types.Have seen some C-130’s on that website only once.

  • Peter B

    says:

    Interested to see the figures in the top right hand corner of the first picture. Does this mean it was transferring fuel at the rate of 110 pounds per minute at the time the image was captured?

  • Paul

    says:

    Nice Tanker & Toaster in Action..

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

KC-30 uses its boom on operations for the first time

written by australianaviation.com.au | October 27, 2015

A Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) E-7A Wedgetail carries out the first operational air-to-air refuellilng from a RAAF KC-30A Multi-Role Tanker Transport aircraft on operations above Iraq.A RAAF KC-30A tanker transport has refuelled a RAAF E-7A Wedgetail AEW&C aircraft on operations for the first time.

The mission over Iraq in support of Coalition operations against Islamic State last week saw the KC-30 use its ARBS (Aerial Refuelling Boom System) to refuel the Wedgetail in the first time a RAAF KC-30 had used its boom on operations.

“Being able to use the KC-30A boom on operations to refuel an aircraft such as the Wedgetail is a force multiplier for Australian air power and Coalition air operations,” Commander of the Australian Air Task Group, Air Commodore Stuart Bellingham, said in a statement.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“Proving this mode of air-to-air refuelling adds to the list of aircraft types that our KC-30A can now support, contributing to another in-demand capability of the coalition air campaign.”

The 17m long ARBS is capable of offloading fuel at a rate of 4,500 litres per minute.

“During this mission we transferred 34,750lb of fuel in about 15 minutes – the equivalent of refuelling 300 family sedans at a rate of less than three seconds per car,” the KC-30’s unnamed air refuelling operator said in the statement.

“We look forward to this becoming a normal part of our operations to assist the Wedgetail’s vital mission of providing airborne early warning, command and control above Iraq and Syria.”

PROMOTED CONTENT

The ARBS boom had a troubled early life – during flight testing a KC-30 bound for the RAAF lost its boom in an incident while refuelling a Portuguese F-16 in January 2011.

But the then Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) announced in March this year that the KC-30 project – AIR 5402 – had been removed from its Projects of Concern list, after an extensive development and testing program resolved issues with the ARBS.

The view from the cockpit of a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) E-7A Wedgetail Airborne Early Warning and Control aircraft as it approaches a RAAF KC-30 Multirole Tanker Transport aircraft in the sky over northern Iraq. Clearly visible is the extended probe of the tanker’s refuelling boom, which features the latest technology available for this difficult operation. This rendezvous was a historic occasion, marking the first air-to-air refuelling of a RAAF aircraft in combat using the KC-30’s tail boom refuelling probe. The refuelling mission resulted in the flawless transfer of nearly 35,000 pounds of fuel from the tanker, allowing the E-7A to remain airborne for over 12 hours.

 

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

7 Comments

  • Allan

    says:

    Good to see, The RAAF can finally be more independent of coalition tanker assets when able to call on one of our own. Looks like all the trials and tribulations have been worthwhile. Well done to all involved.

  • Pontious

    says:

    Good piccy but probably won’t go up on the Boeing website!

  • Greg Alexander

    says:

    I was the E-7A production engineer, and am now KC-30A Reliability Engineer and am very proud of the efforts of all involved (Defence and Contractor collaboration) and the great work done to enable this capability for the ADF.

  • TrashHauler

    says:

    Not every day you get a big Airbus and Boeing flying formation together

  • Daryl

    says:

    Great to see the RAAF with all this nifty new kit.Watched one of the KC30’s flying several oval tracks out over south/central Qld on Monday afternoon on flightradar24.Why do the KC’s us a transponder ,but no other types.Have seen some C-130’s on that website only once.

  • Peter B

    says:

    Interested to see the figures in the top right hand corner of the first picture. Does this mean it was transferring fuel at the rate of 110 pounds per minute at the time the image was captured?

  • Paul

    says:

    Nice Tanker & Toaster in Action..

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

KC-30 uses its boom on operations for the first time

written by australianaviation.com.au | October 27, 2015

A Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) E-7A Wedgetail carries out the first operational air-to-air refuellilng from a RAAF KC-30A Multi-Role Tanker Transport aircraft on operations above Iraq.A RAAF KC-30A tanker transport has refuelled a RAAF E-7A Wedgetail AEW&C aircraft on operations for the first time.

The mission over Iraq in support of Coalition operations against Islamic State last week saw the KC-30 use its ARBS (Aerial Refuelling Boom System) to refuel the Wedgetail in the first time a RAAF KC-30 had used its boom on operations.

“Being able to use the KC-30A boom on operations to refuel an aircraft such as the Wedgetail is a force multiplier for Australian air power and Coalition air operations,” Commander of the Australian Air Task Group, Air Commodore Stuart Bellingham, said in a statement.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“Proving this mode of air-to-air refuelling adds to the list of aircraft types that our KC-30A can now support, contributing to another in-demand capability of the coalition air campaign.”

The 17m long ARBS is capable of offloading fuel at a rate of 4,500 litres per minute.

“During this mission we transferred 34,750lb of fuel in about 15 minutes – the equivalent of refuelling 300 family sedans at a rate of less than three seconds per car,” the KC-30’s unnamed air refuelling operator said in the statement.

“We look forward to this becoming a normal part of our operations to assist the Wedgetail’s vital mission of providing airborne early warning, command and control above Iraq and Syria.”

PROMOTED CONTENT

The ARBS boom had a troubled early life – during flight testing a KC-30 bound for the RAAF lost its boom in an incident while refuelling a Portuguese F-16 in January 2011.

But the then Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) announced in March this year that the KC-30 project – AIR 5402 – had been removed from its Projects of Concern list, after an extensive development and testing program resolved issues with the ARBS.

The view from the cockpit of a Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) E-7A Wedgetail Airborne Early Warning and Control aircraft as it approaches a RAAF KC-30 Multirole Tanker Transport aircraft in the sky over northern Iraq. Clearly visible is the extended probe of the tanker’s refuelling boom, which features the latest technology available for this difficult operation. This rendezvous was a historic occasion, marking the first air-to-air refuelling of a RAAF aircraft in combat using the KC-30’s tail boom refuelling probe. The refuelling mission resulted in the flawless transfer of nearly 35,000 pounds of fuel from the tanker, allowing the E-7A to remain airborne for over 12 hours.

 

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

7 Comments

  • Allan

    says:

    Good to see, The RAAF can finally be more independent of coalition tanker assets when able to call on one of our own. Looks like all the trials and tribulations have been worthwhile. Well done to all involved.

  • Pontious

    says:

    Good piccy but probably won’t go up on the Boeing website!

  • Greg Alexander

    says:

    I was the E-7A production engineer, and am now KC-30A Reliability Engineer and am very proud of the efforts of all involved (Defence and Contractor collaboration) and the great work done to enable this capability for the ADF.

  • TrashHauler

    says:

    Not every day you get a big Airbus and Boeing flying formation together

  • Daryl

    says:

    Great to see the RAAF with all this nifty new kit.Watched one of the KC30’s flying several oval tracks out over south/central Qld on Monday afternoon on flightradar24.Why do the KC’s us a transponder ,but no other types.Have seen some C-130’s on that website only once.

  • Peter B

    says:

    Interested to see the figures in the top right hand corner of the first picture. Does this mean it was transferring fuel at the rate of 110 pounds per minute at the time the image was captured?

  • Paul

    says:

    Nice Tanker & Toaster in Action..

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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