Close sidebar

Name debate begins on proposed Badgerys Creek airport

written by australianaviation.com.au | November 10, 2014
Looking west over Badgerys Creek. (Seth Jaworski)
Looking west over Badgerys Creek. (Seth Jaworski)

While construction is yet to begin on the proposed western Sydney airport located at Badgerys Creek, debate has already started on what to call the new facility.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott kicked things off at the inaugural Bradfield Oration on November 5, when he advocated the airport should be named after the NSW engineer John Bradfield, who designed the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the city’s rail network.

“One way to sustain enthusiasm for the new airport could be to name it after a champion for Sydney and I can’t think of a better candidate than John Bradfield,” the Prime Minister said.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“I suspect that many other Sydneysiders might think so, too.

“We shouldn’t forget that aviation was also one of John Bradfield’s interests.”

However, others have thrown up aviation pioneer Lawrence Hargrave as another exceptional Australian deserving of an airport named in his honour.

The Australian division of the Royal Aeronautical Society has written an open letter to the Prime Minister asking Hargrave be considered.

PROMOTED CONTENT

RAeS (Australia division) president Noel Schmidt says Hargrave would be “a more relevant and fitting pioneer name” than Bradfield.

Moreover, Hargrave had an “immediately recognisable association with aviation that Bradfield does not”.

“Hargrave was a global aviation pioneer whose work with box kites undoubtedly accelerated the development of the principles of fixed-wing aeronautics,” Schmidt said in his letter to the Prime Minister.

“Hargrave’s willingness to freely share his experimental data with others across the globe was an extraordinary contribution to the phenomenon of mankind’s first flight early in the 20th century.

“It is almost shameful that, in his time, Hargrave was far better known in the USA for the work he was doing than in his own country.”

Support for Hargrave has also come from non-aviation circles.

Wollongong councillor Leigh Colacino said he too had written to Tony Abbott to put forward the case for Hargrave, who he described as “the man on a world scale who got us into the air”.

“He is recognised around the world as being the forefather of flight, and he stands tall as a world-recognised scientist,” Cr Colacino told the Illawarra Mercury on November 7.

“There will be approach roads and rail leading to the airport and I see no reason why Bradfield should not give his name to those, given his brilliance in that sort of infrastructure.”

Hargrave’s Kite Day, an event every two years where schoolchildren gather at Stanwell Park near Wollongong to fill the sky with kites in honour of the aviation pioneer, will be held on Wednesday November 12.

On that day 120 years ago in 1894, Hargrave was lifted 16 feet in the air by four box-kites, one of the most significant breakthroughs in the development of the modern aircraft.

Media commentator Peter Fitzsimons, who is patron of Hargrave’s Kite Day, said Hargrave’s achievements made him the logical choice as the name for the Badgerys Creek Airport.

“What better name to give a second Sydney airport, than after the Sydney man who made the breakthrough that started the whole shebang in the first place?,” FitzSimons wrote in The Sydney Morning Herald on November 7.

What do you think? Bradfield Airport? Or Hargrave Airport? What about Gough Whitlam Airport?

Fly into Spring with Australian Aviation’s latest print edition. Starting from $49.95 a year, you can read comprehensive coverage on all sectors of the industry to keep you in the loop. Get your hands on the subscription today. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

6 Comments

  • Wayne Hinchcliffe

    says:

    Reading your article in todays Telegraph I strongly support the naming of the new Airport to be after Delfos Badgery. After all he was the first to fly in this Country and the history surrounding Badgery’s Creek development should be preserved, following the settlement of James & Elizabeth Badgery in 1799.. We are losing too much of the Countries Heritage.

  • Rodney Marinkovic

    says:

    Most proper name and fair go to future Badgery’s Creek airport have to be name of late James Strong. This famous man and leader in passenger’s aviation and CEO of QANTAS AIRWAYS. in two terms, deserving to be choose from Australian people and people belong to civil aviation in particular.
    Let to be western Sydney “JAMES STRONG ” SYDNEY.
    With respect,
    Rodney Marinkovic, Kraljevo Serbia.

  • Tim

    says:

    “”Boomerang.”” The invention of the wing, it reflects Australia’s Aboriginal heritage and is uniquely Australian.

  • tom conroy

    says:

    I believe the airport should be called Macquarie international airport sydney

  • If America has JFK, England has Heathrow and Paris has CDG we should honour the most influential and dynamic Australian.
    The Bob Hawke!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Name debate begins on proposed Badgerys Creek airport

written by australianaviation.com.au | November 10, 2014
Looking west over Badgerys Creek. (Seth Jaworski)
Looking west over Badgerys Creek. (Seth Jaworski)

While construction is yet to begin on the proposed western Sydney airport located at Badgerys Creek, debate has already started on what to call the new facility.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott kicked things off at the inaugural Bradfield Oration on November 5, when he advocated the airport should be named after the NSW engineer John Bradfield, who designed the Sydney Harbour Bridge and the city’s rail network.

“One way to sustain enthusiasm for the new airport could be to name it after a champion for Sydney and I can’t think of a better candidate than John Bradfield,” the Prime Minister said.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“I suspect that many other Sydneysiders might think so, too.

“We shouldn’t forget that aviation was also one of John Bradfield’s interests.”

However, others have thrown up aviation pioneer Lawrence Hargrave as another exceptional Australian deserving of an airport named in his honour.

The Australian division of the Royal Aeronautical Society has written an open letter to the Prime Minister asking Hargrave be considered.

PROMOTED CONTENT

RAeS (Australia division) president Noel Schmidt says Hargrave would be “a more relevant and fitting pioneer name” than Bradfield.

Moreover, Hargrave had an “immediately recognisable association with aviation that Bradfield does not”.

“Hargrave was a global aviation pioneer whose work with box kites undoubtedly accelerated the development of the principles of fixed-wing aeronautics,” Schmidt said in his letter to the Prime Minister.

“Hargrave’s willingness to freely share his experimental data with others across the globe was an extraordinary contribution to the phenomenon of mankind’s first flight early in the 20th century.

“It is almost shameful that, in his time, Hargrave was far better known in the USA for the work he was doing than in his own country.”

Support for Hargrave has also come from non-aviation circles.

Wollongong councillor Leigh Colacino said he too had written to Tony Abbott to put forward the case for Hargrave, who he described as “the man on a world scale who got us into the air”.

“He is recognised around the world as being the forefather of flight, and he stands tall as a world-recognised scientist,” Cr Colacino told the Illawarra Mercury on November 7.

“There will be approach roads and rail leading to the airport and I see no reason why Bradfield should not give his name to those, given his brilliance in that sort of infrastructure.”

Hargrave’s Kite Day, an event every two years where schoolchildren gather at Stanwell Park near Wollongong to fill the sky with kites in honour of the aviation pioneer, will be held on Wednesday November 12.

On that day 120 years ago in 1894, Hargrave was lifted 16 feet in the air by four box-kites, one of the most significant breakthroughs in the development of the modern aircraft.

Media commentator Peter Fitzsimons, who is patron of Hargrave’s Kite Day, said Hargrave’s achievements made him the logical choice as the name for the Badgerys Creek Airport.

“What better name to give a second Sydney airport, than after the Sydney man who made the breakthrough that started the whole shebang in the first place?,” FitzSimons wrote in The Sydney Morning Herald on November 7.

What do you think? Bradfield Airport? Or Hargrave Airport? What about Gough Whitlam Airport?

Fly into Spring with Australian Aviation’s latest print edition. Starting from $49.95 a year, you can read comprehensive coverage on all sectors of the industry to keep you in the loop. Get your hands on the subscription today. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

6 Comments

  • Wayne Hinchcliffe

    says:

    Reading your article in todays Telegraph I strongly support the naming of the new Airport to be after Delfos Badgery. After all he was the first to fly in this Country and the history surrounding Badgery’s Creek development should be preserved, following the settlement of James & Elizabeth Badgery in 1799.. We are losing too much of the Countries Heritage.

  • Rodney Marinkovic

    says:

    Most proper name and fair go to future Badgery’s Creek airport have to be name of late James Strong. This famous man and leader in passenger’s aviation and CEO of QANTAS AIRWAYS. in two terms, deserving to be choose from Australian people and people belong to civil aviation in particular.
    Let to be western Sydney “JAMES STRONG ” SYDNEY.
    With respect,
    Rodney Marinkovic, Kraljevo Serbia.

  • Tim

    says:

    “”Boomerang.”” The invention of the wing, it reflects Australia’s Aboriginal heritage and is uniquely Australian.

  • tom conroy

    says:

    I believe the airport should be called Macquarie international airport sydney

  • If America has JFK, England has Heathrow and Paris has CDG we should honour the most influential and dynamic Australian.
    The Bob Hawke!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Each day, our subscribers are more informed with the right information.

SIGN UP to the Australian Aviation magazine for high-quality news and features for just $99.95 per year