Power outage causes delays at Sydney’s Terminal 2

written by australianaviation.com.au | June 27, 2014
Tigerair, Virgin Jetstar and Rex all faced significant disruptions at Sydney Airport on Friday morning. (Seth Jaworski)
Tigerair, Virgin Jetstar and Rex all faced significant disruptions at Sydney Airport on Friday morning. (Seth Jaworski).

A power outage attributed to an issue with an electrical substation caused chaos at Sydney Airport’s domestic Terminal 2 on Friday morning, resulting in disruptions to flights operated by tenants Virgin Australia, Jetstar, Tigerair and Regional Express.

The outage, which lasted about three hours, meant airlines could not process passenger check-ins, nor could security screening be completed. Consequently, airlines were forced to delay or cancel several services from and to Sydney.

“Sydney Airport has identified an issue with a substation, which caused the power interruption and affected back-up power sources,” Sydney Airport said in a statement issued at midday.

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“Sydney Airport apologises for any inconvenience caused by the power interruption.”

5 Comments

  • Adrian

    says:

    I bet they wish they had some pv panels and a Bosch solar storage system

  • Greg

    says:

    In the bizz it’s called a “single point of failure”.

    I hope the builders of the new Sydney airport will be smart enough (up to date) to build a redundant mains power supply on the site.

    Maybe Australia will join the 21st Century with regard to major infrastructure being supported by redundant power systems.

  • Peter

    says:

    Disaster Recovery Manual 1.01 … provide a second independent power supply. How can you have the backup on the same source? It’s basic! Is this a case of strip out costs, look after the profit, take a risk on the customers and say it was someone else’s fault?

  • Steve

    says:

    I suspect the airlines affected will be seeking compensation from Sydney Airport Corp (or Macquarie or whatever their name is). Would be interesting to find out just how much the decision to have the single point of failure in the power supply is going to cost.

    Perhaps it was a business decision that a failure which may be expected to occur only once every 20 years would actually cost less upgrading the system with a form of redundancy…

  • Adrian

    says:

    So do we go for competition and let another company build/operate Badgerys Creek or do we go for two airports operated by one company (Single point of failure).

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