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RAN MH-60Rs commence sonar dipping training

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 15, 2014
A NUSQN725 Romeo employs the ALFS dipping sonar off Florida. (Defence)
A NUSQN725 Romeo employs the ALFS dipping sonar off Florida. (Defence)

The RAN’s NUSQN725 MH-60R Romeo Seahawk training unit embedded with US Navy training squadrons at NAS Jacksonville in Florida has started dipping sonar operations.

The unit has received, installed and calibrated its first Airborne Low Frequency Sonar System (ALFS), and has been conducting trials in an exercise area off the Florida coast. The ALFS comprises the dipping transducer, a reeling machine, and onboard processors.

“This is what it’s all about,” Chief Petty Officer Aircrewman Nathan Minett told Navy News after the first sortie. “This is one of the primary roles of the aircraft and it’s great to see the system operating as advertised.”

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Added unit executive office LCDR Todd Glynn; “This system, in concert with others, will give the Romeo a tactical anti-submarine advantage and I look forward to seeing it doing the business for the Fleet. I was lucky enough to be part of 817 SQN (Sea Kings) when they had a dipping capability and it’s incredible to see how the systems have developed over the years.”

NUSQN 725 is due to start a “phased return” to Australia from October where it will be commissioned at its home base of HMAS Albatross near Nowra before Christmas.

NUSQN725 is due to return to Australia for commissioning by Christmas. (Defence)
NUSQN725 is due to return to Australia for commissioning by Christmas. (Defence)

25% off starts now! Australian Aviation magazine Cyber Monday sale is now live. Have the very best of Australian Aviation’s annual print and digital subscription. This includes every In Focus and Behind the Lens digital magazine, special coverage, exclusive photos and editions you may have miss. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

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RAN MH-60Rs commence sonar dipping training

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 15, 2014
A NUSQN725 Romeo employs the ALFS dipping sonar off Florida. (Defence)
A NUSQN725 Romeo employs the ALFS dipping sonar off Florida. (Defence)

The RAN’s NUSQN725 MH-60R Romeo Seahawk training unit embedded with US Navy training squadrons at NAS Jacksonville in Florida has started dipping sonar operations.

The unit has received, installed and calibrated its first Airborne Low Frequency Sonar System (ALFS), and has been conducting trials in an exercise area off the Florida coast. The ALFS comprises the dipping transducer, a reeling machine, and onboard processors.

“This is what it’s all about,” Chief Petty Officer Aircrewman Nathan Minett told Navy News after the first sortie. “This is one of the primary roles of the aircraft and it’s great to see the system operating as advertised.”

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Added unit executive office LCDR Todd Glynn; “This system, in concert with others, will give the Romeo a tactical anti-submarine advantage and I look forward to seeing it doing the business for the Fleet. I was lucky enough to be part of 817 SQN (Sea Kings) when they had a dipping capability and it’s incredible to see how the systems have developed over the years.”

NUSQN 725 is due to start a “phased return” to Australia from October where it will be commissioned at its home base of HMAS Albatross near Nowra before Christmas.

NUSQN725 is due to return to Australia for commissioning by Christmas. (Defence)
NUSQN725 is due to return to Australia for commissioning by Christmas. (Defence)

25% off starts now! Australian Aviation magazine Cyber Monday sale is now live. Have the very best of Australian Aviation’s annual print and digital subscription. This includes every In Focus and Behind the Lens digital magazine, special coverage, exclusive photos and editions you may have miss. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

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RAN MH-60Rs commence sonar dipping training

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 15, 2014
A NUSQN725 Romeo employs the ALFS dipping sonar off Florida. (Defence)
A NUSQN725 Romeo employs the ALFS dipping sonar off Florida. (Defence)

The RAN’s NUSQN725 MH-60R Romeo Seahawk training unit embedded with US Navy training squadrons at NAS Jacksonville in Florida has started dipping sonar operations.

The unit has received, installed and calibrated its first Airborne Low Frequency Sonar System (ALFS), and has been conducting trials in an exercise area off the Florida coast. The ALFS comprises the dipping transducer, a reeling machine, and onboard processors.

“This is what it’s all about,” Chief Petty Officer Aircrewman Nathan Minett told Navy News after the first sortie. “This is one of the primary roles of the aircraft and it’s great to see the system operating as advertised.”

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Added unit executive office LCDR Todd Glynn; “This system, in concert with others, will give the Romeo a tactical anti-submarine advantage and I look forward to seeing it doing the business for the Fleet. I was lucky enough to be part of 817 SQN (Sea Kings) when they had a dipping capability and it’s incredible to see how the systems have developed over the years.”

NUSQN 725 is due to start a “phased return” to Australia from October where it will be commissioned at its home base of HMAS Albatross near Nowra before Christmas.

NUSQN725 is due to return to Australia for commissioning by Christmas. (Defence)
NUSQN725 is due to return to Australia for commissioning by Christmas. (Defence)

25% off starts now! Australian Aviation magazine Cyber Monday sale is now live. Have the very best of Australian Aviation’s annual print and digital subscription. This includes every In Focus and Behind the Lens digital magazine, special coverage, exclusive photos and editions you may have miss. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

RAN MH-60Rs commence sonar dipping training

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 15, 2014
A NUSQN725 Romeo employs the ALFS dipping sonar off Florida. (Defence)
A NUSQN725 Romeo employs the ALFS dipping sonar off Florida. (Defence)

The RAN’s NUSQN725 MH-60R Romeo Seahawk training unit embedded with US Navy training squadrons at NAS Jacksonville in Florida has started dipping sonar operations.

The unit has received, installed and calibrated its first Airborne Low Frequency Sonar System (ALFS), and has been conducting trials in an exercise area off the Florida coast. The ALFS comprises the dipping transducer, a reeling machine, and onboard processors.

“This is what it’s all about,” Chief Petty Officer Aircrewman Nathan Minett told Navy News after the first sortie. “This is one of the primary roles of the aircraft and it’s great to see the system operating as advertised.”

Advertisement
Advertisement

Added unit executive office LCDR Todd Glynn; “This system, in concert with others, will give the Romeo a tactical anti-submarine advantage and I look forward to seeing it doing the business for the Fleet. I was lucky enough to be part of 817 SQN (Sea Kings) when they had a dipping capability and it’s incredible to see how the systems have developed over the years.”

NUSQN 725 is due to start a “phased return” to Australia from October where it will be commissioned at its home base of HMAS Albatross near Nowra before Christmas.

NUSQN725 is due to return to Australia for commissioning by Christmas. (Defence)
NUSQN725 is due to return to Australia for commissioning by Christmas. (Defence)

25% off starts now! Australian Aviation magazine Cyber Monday sale is now live. Have the very best of Australian Aviation’s annual print and digital subscription. This includes every In Focus and Behind the Lens digital magazine, special coverage, exclusive photos and editions you may have miss. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

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