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CH-53K unveiled – named King Stallion

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 6, 2014
The first CH-53K was rolled out on May 5. (Sikorsky)
The first CH-53K was rolled out on May 5. (Sikorsky)

The first Sikorsky CH-53K has been rolled out at a ceremony at the company’s Long Beach facility in Florida.

Named King Stallion as a tribute to its CH-53E Sea Stallion lineage, the new CH-53K is a larger and almost completely new machine with far greater capabilities, despite sharing a similar mould line.

“The rollout of the CH-53K helicopter introduces a new era in Marine Corps aviation and is an exciting milestone in our company’s 91 year history,” Sikorsky president Mick Maurer said at the rollout. “The CH-53K aircraft will effectively triple the external load carrying capacity of the CH-53E aircraft — to more than [13,000kg] over a mission radius of [200km]. With its [42,000kg] maximum gross weight, powerful new engines, lightweight composite structure, new rotor blades and fly-by-wire flight controls, the CH-53K will have the means to move troops and equipment from ship to shore, and to higher altitude terrain, more quickly and effectively than ever before.”

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The CH-53K is powered by three GE T408 engines which provide 57 per cent more power while using 20 per cent less fuel than the CH-53E’s T64 turboshafts.

The USMC has a requirement for more than 200 CH-53Ks to replace its Vietnam-era CH-53Es, with service entry expected to commence in 2017. Ground engine and dynamic component testing is well underway, and flight trials will start later this year.

8 Comments

  • Michael

    says:

    Coming from a proud line of Stallions. If the Italians operated these I bet you could all guess what they would get knick named.

  • Raymond

    says:

    Just amazing how the same basic airframe design, albeit larger, can have its external load carrying capacity effectively tripled.

    Equally amazing is how engine design progresses, with an engine capable of providing 57 per cent more power while using 20 per cent less fuel.

  • Michael

    says:

    Raymond I remember reading somewhere once that said most of what we know about aerodynamics in aviation for what we use it for today was learnt during the cold war. Perhaps this is testament to that. Other examples are the Hercules and Chinook still being in production and service for their original operators after more than 50 years and the 737 MAX being due to enter service 50 years after the first flight of the original 737. So yes amazing if you think about it.

  • William

    says:

    Like the Black Hawk and Chinook, it’s a design that works. The USMC have obviously decided to stick with what they know and not go out on a limb on something unproven. Any idea if a Pave Low version is on the cards?

  • Mark

    says:

    I’ve said it before. The RAN should have a small flight of these to operate from the LHD’s. That would provide great capability in amphibious operations, disaster relief etc.

  • Mark

    says:

    Raymond – I’m aka Ben (naval nickname). I never realised the comments after mine. Having served on a Seaking squadron in the RN on the Ark Royal, I was onboard when chinooks were used in an exercise. The Ark being around the same length as the LHD’s only really managed to fit three. One broke down as the intermediate gear box failed. They couldn’t take it below decks to repair as the rotor head did not fold. It took up far too much deck space as well because of the lack of folding. The CH53 has a folding head. So for flight deck ops it really makes sense.

  • Raymond

    says:

    Mark – don’t get me wrong, I’m all for improving and increasing the ADF’s effectiveness and funding… however, I just don’t see CH-53’s being acquired as well, especially considering the desire to rationalise the number of helicopter types in the ADF fleet.

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CH-53K unveiled – named King Stallion

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 6, 2014
The first CH-53K was rolled out on May 5. (Sikorsky)
The first CH-53K was rolled out on May 5. (Sikorsky)

The first Sikorsky CH-53K has been rolled out at a ceremony at the company’s Long Beach facility in Florida.

Named King Stallion as a tribute to its CH-53E Sea Stallion lineage, the new CH-53K is a larger and almost completely new machine with far greater capabilities, despite sharing a similar mould line.

“The rollout of the CH-53K helicopter introduces a new era in Marine Corps aviation and is an exciting milestone in our company’s 91 year history,” Sikorsky president Mick Maurer said at the rollout. “The CH-53K aircraft will effectively triple the external load carrying capacity of the CH-53E aircraft — to more than [13,000kg] over a mission radius of [200km]. With its [42,000kg] maximum gross weight, powerful new engines, lightweight composite structure, new rotor blades and fly-by-wire flight controls, the CH-53K will have the means to move troops and equipment from ship to shore, and to higher altitude terrain, more quickly and effectively than ever before.”

Advertisement
Advertisement

The CH-53K is powered by three GE T408 engines which provide 57 per cent more power while using 20 per cent less fuel than the CH-53E’s T64 turboshafts.

The USMC has a requirement for more than 200 CH-53Ks to replace its Vietnam-era CH-53Es, with service entry expected to commence in 2017. Ground engine and dynamic component testing is well underway, and flight trials will start later this year.

8 Comments

  • Michael

    says:

    Coming from a proud line of Stallions. If the Italians operated these I bet you could all guess what they would get knick named.

  • Raymond

    says:

    Just amazing how the same basic airframe design, albeit larger, can have its external load carrying capacity effectively tripled.

    Equally amazing is how engine design progresses, with an engine capable of providing 57 per cent more power while using 20 per cent less fuel.

  • Michael

    says:

    Raymond I remember reading somewhere once that said most of what we know about aerodynamics in aviation for what we use it for today was learnt during the cold war. Perhaps this is testament to that. Other examples are the Hercules and Chinook still being in production and service for their original operators after more than 50 years and the 737 MAX being due to enter service 50 years after the first flight of the original 737. So yes amazing if you think about it.

  • William

    says:

    Like the Black Hawk and Chinook, it’s a design that works. The USMC have obviously decided to stick with what they know and not go out on a limb on something unproven. Any idea if a Pave Low version is on the cards?

  • Mark

    says:

    I’ve said it before. The RAN should have a small flight of these to operate from the LHD’s. That would provide great capability in amphibious operations, disaster relief etc.

  • Mark

    says:

    Raymond – I’m aka Ben (naval nickname). I never realised the comments after mine. Having served on a Seaking squadron in the RN on the Ark Royal, I was onboard when chinooks were used in an exercise. The Ark being around the same length as the LHD’s only really managed to fit three. One broke down as the intermediate gear box failed. They couldn’t take it below decks to repair as the rotor head did not fold. It took up far too much deck space as well because of the lack of folding. The CH53 has a folding head. So for flight deck ops it really makes sense.

  • Raymond

    says:

    Mark – don’t get me wrong, I’m all for improving and increasing the ADF’s effectiveness and funding… however, I just don’t see CH-53’s being acquired as well, especially considering the desire to rationalise the number of helicopter types in the ADF fleet.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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