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Jetstar’s first 787 touches down

written by australianaviation.com.au | October 9, 2013
VH-VKA lands at Melbourne. (Gerard Frawley)
VH-VKA lands at Melbourne. (Gerard Frawley)

Jetstar’s first 787 has touched down in Melbourne this afternoon at the end of its delivery flight from Boeing’s Everett factory.

The 787-8, registered VH-VKA and operating as flight JQ7878, touched down at Melbourne Airport at 1:13pm, ending an eight year gestation for the Qantas Group, which had first ordered the 787 in 2008.

Onboard the aircraft was a small contingent of Jetstar and Qantas personnel, including Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce and Jetstar CEO Jayne Hyrdlicka, as well media.

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They were met at Melbourne Airport by Victorian Premier Dennis Napthine, Victorian Aviation Minister Gordon Rich-Phillips, federal industry minister Ian Macfarlane and representatives from Boeing and engine-manufacturer General Electric.

Remarked Alan Joyce: “Today is historic for the Qantas Group and Jetstar. We have taken delivery of the world’s most advanced passenger aircraft.

Hrdlicka used the aircraft’s arrival to confirm Jetstar’s first 787 international services.

“I am delighted to announce that our first scheduled international services will depart Melbourne to one of our most popular destinations – Bali, with the 787 operating a daily service over the summer period,”  Hrdlicka said.

PROMOTED CONTENT

“Tickets are now on sale for our first 787 flight to Bali on Wednesday 18 December. We expect to add more destinations, including Phuket, Japan, Hawaii and Singapore, to the 787’s flying schedule as we receive more aircraft.”

Hrdlicka had earlier announced at the aircraft’s handover at Everett that the 787 would be deployed on domestic Melbourne-Gold Coast flights while crews build experience on the type.

Jetstar says that “subject to the certification of the newest standard of even more fuel efficient engines”, it expects to have three 787s operating early next year and an all 787 long haul fleet by the end of 2015.  The airline’s 787 configuration seats 335 passengers and feature a 21 seat business class cabin and 314 seats in economy. There is  inflight entertainment available for purchase in every seat.

photo - Gerard Frawley
photo – Gerard Frawley

 

photo - Gerard Frawley
photo – Gerard Frawley

 

photo - Gerard Frawley
photo – Gerard Frawley

26 Comments

  • adammudhen

    says:

    Saw it come in over the city on approach. Great to see it arrive safely.

  • Mick F

    says:

    I know that the nacelles have to be white to reap the performance and efficiency, but gee it would look that much more sweeter if they were grey.

  • George

    says:

    Don’t worry Sydney spotters, you’ll inevitably get to see it when it diverts there with technical issues mid flight MEL OOL.

  • Steve

    says:

    That silver paint job looks terrible. Think it needs to goback for a second coat. Definitely not up to QF group standards

  • Brett M

    says:

    I have been following the development of this aircraft since its inception as the Sonic Cruiser back in 2001 and the arrival of Australia’s first 787 has been a long time coming.

    Hopefully the 787 turns out to be a Dreamliner for Jetstar.

  • David VG

    says:

    I hope the water canon is a traditional welcome, or is it a precaution, just in case?

  • Ante C

    says:

    Congrats to Jetstar.

  • Chris Peartster

    says:

    I love the new 787, it was awesome watching the arrival on RWY 69 after work, I took 47 pictures for my album…….what a day well worth the wait.

  • Chris Peartster

    says:

    Me and my mate Ben will be sharing our snaps tonight. Woo hoo. Cleared direct, no IFR traffic!

  • ATCGUN

    says:

    I had to time my breaks so I could watch it from the office window! Spewing I didn’t get to talk to him :(. Sweet ride!!

  • Raymond

    says:

    Could someone please explain how exactly does making the nacelles white increase performance and efficiency?

  • Mark Holmes

    says:

    The paint is crucial to the aircraft’s economics because laminar flow reduces skin friction drag, and cuts fuel burn, but it requires a smooth surface with minimal boundary disruption.

    Even the thickness of paint layers can interrupt the laminar flow between the engine inlet and the surface of the nacelle. The white is best as it requires less layers of paint to get it white. BA have convinced Boeing to paint theirs in the traditional blue as have Qatar who have theirs grey.

  • Damian

    says:

    Raymond it’s got something to do with the light colouring requires less coats of paint. The airflow over the engines has been designed in such a way that lighter coating provides optimal efficient airflow. Once you need darker colours or clear coats etc the extra thickness of the paint must disrupt the airflow so it is less efficient.

  • Matt

    says:

    Interestingly BA is getting blue nacelles….! A deviation from the standard white due to ‘laminar flow considerations’ – whatever that means….

  • adammudhen

    says:

    @Raymond,

    to the best of my understanding, due to the effects of laminar flow over certain parts of the airframe, the thickness of the paint impacts the performance. The paint/coverings used in these areas is only available in certain colours due to different pigments changing the consistency of the paint.

    The wrong thickness in some areas, measured in millimeters, can have up to a ~1% increase in drag.

  • HAHA

    says:

    Raymond,

    It helps when they in a hurry to find a replacement. Shorten the time on the ground. 😀

  • KLeigh

    says:

    @Raymond I’ve heard that it’s something to do with the amount of paint that would need to go on them. With extra paint it can affect the aerodynamics and reduce the efficiency of the engines. Although I’m a little confused as British Airways have theirs painted blue, whereas all other 787s are white.

  • Greg

    says:

    A new generation in Australian Aviation.

    This was the first B787 to land at Honolulu during it’s delivery flight.

    Well Done,

    Jetstar

  • Paul

    says:

    Nothing wrong with the paint job looks great close up just different light conditions make it look lighter.

  • mick prendergast

    says:

    i dont mind the paint scheme-kind of the opposite of qantas painting the RB 211s grey on the 747-4s and ex BA 767s.like most things it will grow on you.

  • Raymond

    says:

    Many thanks to all those who took the time to inform the reasons for this – and to the humourous explanation too! 🙂

  • PHS

    says:

    Shame the whole thing isn’t white – and a red tail with a kangaroo on it!

  • Patrick Kilby

    says:

    If you look at the specs on the Jestar site the 787 seems to have de-rated engines, as the range is much less than the maximum possible, but enough to do Honolulu and Asia, but not the US Ex Oz or Europe Ex Asia.

  • Lazybones

    says:

    @Paul + @Steve

    I haven’t seen it in the flesh yet but I also thought the paint job looked patchy. Not just in the above photos but others i’ve seen on the web.

    Also if we’re at the point where the paint job on the engines is key to the efficiency of the aircraft then we had all best look out for excess body weight charges for pax over 90kgs 🙂

  • John Harrison

    says:

    Great to see the aircraft arrive into Australia, doubt we will see the B787 in Perth any time soon.
    Question currently Jetstar charges for movies etc. With each seat with a screen in it, how will the go about
    getting passengers to pay for the movies ? Just a thought
    Good like and I am sure it will be a nicer flight than Jetstars AB320s
    And I still say this aircraft should be in Qantas colours not Jetstar, but we all know the CEO of Qantas wants to
    promote Jetstar over Qantas !!

  • ian hocking

    says:

    Hi
    just enquiring to find out when the 787 is coming into the gold coast for its dry run.

    thank you
    regards
    ian

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Jetstar’s first 787 touches down

written by australianaviation.com.au | October 9, 2013
VH-VKA lands at Melbourne. (Gerard Frawley)
VH-VKA lands at Melbourne. (Gerard Frawley)

Jetstar’s first 787 has touched down in Melbourne this afternoon at the end of its delivery flight from Boeing’s Everett factory.

The 787-8, registered VH-VKA and operating as flight JQ7878, touched down at Melbourne Airport at 1:13pm, ending an eight year gestation for the Qantas Group, which had first ordered the 787 in 2008.

Onboard the aircraft was a small contingent of Jetstar and Qantas personnel, including Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce and Jetstar CEO Jayne Hyrdlicka, as well media.

Advertisement
Advertisement

They were met at Melbourne Airport by Victorian Premier Dennis Napthine, Victorian Aviation Minister Gordon Rich-Phillips, federal industry minister Ian Macfarlane and representatives from Boeing and engine-manufacturer General Electric.

Remarked Alan Joyce: “Today is historic for the Qantas Group and Jetstar. We have taken delivery of the world’s most advanced passenger aircraft.

Hrdlicka used the aircraft’s arrival to confirm Jetstar’s first 787 international services.

“I am delighted to announce that our first scheduled international services will depart Melbourne to one of our most popular destinations – Bali, with the 787 operating a daily service over the summer period,”  Hrdlicka said.

PROMOTED CONTENT

“Tickets are now on sale for our first 787 flight to Bali on Wednesday 18 December. We expect to add more destinations, including Phuket, Japan, Hawaii and Singapore, to the 787’s flying schedule as we receive more aircraft.”

Hrdlicka had earlier announced at the aircraft’s handover at Everett that the 787 would be deployed on domestic Melbourne-Gold Coast flights while crews build experience on the type.

Jetstar says that “subject to the certification of the newest standard of even more fuel efficient engines”, it expects to have three 787s operating early next year and an all 787 long haul fleet by the end of 2015.  The airline’s 787 configuration seats 335 passengers and feature a 21 seat business class cabin and 314 seats in economy. There is  inflight entertainment available for purchase in every seat.

photo - Gerard Frawley
photo – Gerard Frawley

 

photo - Gerard Frawley
photo – Gerard Frawley

 

photo - Gerard Frawley
photo – Gerard Frawley

26 Comments

  • adammudhen

    says:

    Saw it come in over the city on approach. Great to see it arrive safely.

  • Mick F

    says:

    I know that the nacelles have to be white to reap the performance and efficiency, but gee it would look that much more sweeter if they were grey.

  • George

    says:

    Don’t worry Sydney spotters, you’ll inevitably get to see it when it diverts there with technical issues mid flight MEL OOL.

  • Steve

    says:

    That silver paint job looks terrible. Think it needs to goback for a second coat. Definitely not up to QF group standards

  • Brett M

    says:

    I have been following the development of this aircraft since its inception as the Sonic Cruiser back in 2001 and the arrival of Australia’s first 787 has been a long time coming.

    Hopefully the 787 turns out to be a Dreamliner for Jetstar.

  • David VG

    says:

    I hope the water canon is a traditional welcome, or is it a precaution, just in case?

  • Ante C

    says:

    Congrats to Jetstar.

  • Chris Peartster

    says:

    I love the new 787, it was awesome watching the arrival on RWY 69 after work, I took 47 pictures for my album…….what a day well worth the wait.

  • Chris Peartster

    says:

    Me and my mate Ben will be sharing our snaps tonight. Woo hoo. Cleared direct, no IFR traffic!

  • ATCGUN

    says:

    I had to time my breaks so I could watch it from the office window! Spewing I didn’t get to talk to him :(. Sweet ride!!

  • Raymond

    says:

    Could someone please explain how exactly does making the nacelles white increase performance and efficiency?

  • Mark Holmes

    says:

    The paint is crucial to the aircraft’s economics because laminar flow reduces skin friction drag, and cuts fuel burn, but it requires a smooth surface with minimal boundary disruption.

    Even the thickness of paint layers can interrupt the laminar flow between the engine inlet and the surface of the nacelle. The white is best as it requires less layers of paint to get it white. BA have convinced Boeing to paint theirs in the traditional blue as have Qatar who have theirs grey.

  • Damian

    says:

    Raymond it’s got something to do with the light colouring requires less coats of paint. The airflow over the engines has been designed in such a way that lighter coating provides optimal efficient airflow. Once you need darker colours or clear coats etc the extra thickness of the paint must disrupt the airflow so it is less efficient.

  • Matt

    says:

    Interestingly BA is getting blue nacelles….! A deviation from the standard white due to ‘laminar flow considerations’ – whatever that means….

  • adammudhen

    says:

    @Raymond,

    to the best of my understanding, due to the effects of laminar flow over certain parts of the airframe, the thickness of the paint impacts the performance. The paint/coverings used in these areas is only available in certain colours due to different pigments changing the consistency of the paint.

    The wrong thickness in some areas, measured in millimeters, can have up to a ~1% increase in drag.

  • HAHA

    says:

    Raymond,

    It helps when they in a hurry to find a replacement. Shorten the time on the ground. 😀

  • KLeigh

    says:

    @Raymond I’ve heard that it’s something to do with the amount of paint that would need to go on them. With extra paint it can affect the aerodynamics and reduce the efficiency of the engines. Although I’m a little confused as British Airways have theirs painted blue, whereas all other 787s are white.

  • Greg

    says:

    A new generation in Australian Aviation.

    This was the first B787 to land at Honolulu during it’s delivery flight.

    Well Done,

    Jetstar

  • Paul

    says:

    Nothing wrong with the paint job looks great close up just different light conditions make it look lighter.

  • mick prendergast

    says:

    i dont mind the paint scheme-kind of the opposite of qantas painting the RB 211s grey on the 747-4s and ex BA 767s.like most things it will grow on you.

  • Raymond

    says:

    Many thanks to all those who took the time to inform the reasons for this – and to the humourous explanation too! 🙂

  • PHS

    says:

    Shame the whole thing isn’t white – and a red tail with a kangaroo on it!

  • Patrick Kilby

    says:

    If you look at the specs on the Jestar site the 787 seems to have de-rated engines, as the range is much less than the maximum possible, but enough to do Honolulu and Asia, but not the US Ex Oz or Europe Ex Asia.

  • Lazybones

    says:

    @Paul + @Steve

    I haven’t seen it in the flesh yet but I also thought the paint job looked patchy. Not just in the above photos but others i’ve seen on the web.

    Also if we’re at the point where the paint job on the engines is key to the efficiency of the aircraft then we had all best look out for excess body weight charges for pax over 90kgs 🙂

  • John Harrison

    says:

    Great to see the aircraft arrive into Australia, doubt we will see the B787 in Perth any time soon.
    Question currently Jetstar charges for movies etc. With each seat with a screen in it, how will the go about
    getting passengers to pay for the movies ? Just a thought
    Good like and I am sure it will be a nicer flight than Jetstars AB320s
    And I still say this aircraft should be in Qantas colours not Jetstar, but we all know the CEO of Qantas wants to
    promote Jetstar over Qantas !!

  • ian hocking

    says:

    Hi
    just enquiring to find out when the 787 is coming into the gold coast for its dry run.

    thank you
    regards
    ian

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Jetstar’s first 787 touches down

written by australianaviation.com.au | October 9, 2013
VH-VKA lands at Melbourne. (Gerard Frawley)
VH-VKA lands at Melbourne. (Gerard Frawley)

Jetstar’s first 787 has touched down in Melbourne this afternoon at the end of its delivery flight from Boeing’s Everett factory.

The 787-8, registered VH-VKA and operating as flight JQ7878, touched down at Melbourne Airport at 1:13pm, ending an eight year gestation for the Qantas Group, which had first ordered the 787 in 2008.

Onboard the aircraft was a small contingent of Jetstar and Qantas personnel, including Qantas Group CEO Alan Joyce and Jetstar CEO Jayne Hyrdlicka, as well media.

Advertisement
Advertisement

They were met at Melbourne Airport by Victorian Premier Dennis Napthine, Victorian Aviation Minister Gordon Rich-Phillips, federal industry minister Ian Macfarlane and representatives from Boeing and engine-manufacturer General Electric.

Remarked Alan Joyce: “Today is historic for the Qantas Group and Jetstar. We have taken delivery of the world’s most advanced passenger aircraft.

Hrdlicka used the aircraft’s arrival to confirm Jetstar’s first 787 international services.

“I am delighted to announce that our first scheduled international services will depart Melbourne to one of our most popular destinations – Bali, with the 787 operating a daily service over the summer period,”  Hrdlicka said.

PROMOTED CONTENT

“Tickets are now on sale for our first 787 flight to Bali on Wednesday 18 December. We expect to add more destinations, including Phuket, Japan, Hawaii and Singapore, to the 787’s flying schedule as we receive more aircraft.”

Hrdlicka had earlier announced at the aircraft’s handover at Everett that the 787 would be deployed on domestic Melbourne-Gold Coast flights while crews build experience on the type.

Jetstar says that “subject to the certification of the newest standard of even more fuel efficient engines”, it expects to have three 787s operating early next year and an all 787 long haul fleet by the end of 2015.  The airline’s 787 configuration seats 335 passengers and feature a 21 seat business class cabin and 314 seats in economy. There is  inflight entertainment available for purchase in every seat.

photo - Gerard Frawley
photo – Gerard Frawley

 

photo - Gerard Frawley
photo – Gerard Frawley

 

photo - Gerard Frawley
photo – Gerard Frawley

26 Comments

  • adammudhen

    says:

    Saw it come in over the city on approach. Great to see it arrive safely.

  • Mick F

    says:

    I know that the nacelles have to be white to reap the performance and efficiency, but gee it would look that much more sweeter if they were grey.

  • George

    says:

    Don’t worry Sydney spotters, you’ll inevitably get to see it when it diverts there with technical issues mid flight MEL OOL.

  • Steve

    says:

    That silver paint job looks terrible. Think it needs to goback for a second coat. Definitely not up to QF group standards

  • Brett M

    says:

    I have been following the development of this aircraft since its inception as the Sonic Cruiser back in 2001 and the arrival of Australia’s first 787 has been a long time coming.

    Hopefully the 787 turns out to be a Dreamliner for Jetstar.

  • David VG

    says:

    I hope the water canon is a traditional welcome, or is it a precaution, just in case?

  • Ante C

    says:

    Congrats to Jetstar.

  • Chris Peartster

    says:

    I love the new 787, it was awesome watching the arrival on RWY 69 after work, I took 47 pictures for my album…….what a day well worth the wait.

  • Chris Peartster

    says:

    Me and my mate Ben will be sharing our snaps tonight. Woo hoo. Cleared direct, no IFR traffic!

  • ATCGUN

    says:

    I had to time my breaks so I could watch it from the office window! Spewing I didn’t get to talk to him :(. Sweet ride!!

  • Raymond

    says:

    Could someone please explain how exactly does making the nacelles white increase performance and efficiency?

  • Mark Holmes

    says:

    The paint is crucial to the aircraft’s economics because laminar flow reduces skin friction drag, and cuts fuel burn, but it requires a smooth surface with minimal boundary disruption.

    Even the thickness of paint layers can interrupt the laminar flow between the engine inlet and the surface of the nacelle. The white is best as it requires less layers of paint to get it white. BA have convinced Boeing to paint theirs in the traditional blue as have Qatar who have theirs grey.

  • Damian

    says:

    Raymond it’s got something to do with the light colouring requires less coats of paint. The airflow over the engines has been designed in such a way that lighter coating provides optimal efficient airflow. Once you need darker colours or clear coats etc the extra thickness of the paint must disrupt the airflow so it is less efficient.

  • Matt

    says:

    Interestingly BA is getting blue nacelles….! A deviation from the standard white due to ‘laminar flow considerations’ – whatever that means….

  • adammudhen

    says:

    @Raymond,

    to the best of my understanding, due to the effects of laminar flow over certain parts of the airframe, the thickness of the paint impacts the performance. The paint/coverings used in these areas is only available in certain colours due to different pigments changing the consistency of the paint.

    The wrong thickness in some areas, measured in millimeters, can have up to a ~1% increase in drag.

  • HAHA

    says:

    Raymond,

    It helps when they in a hurry to find a replacement. Shorten the time on the ground. 😀

  • KLeigh

    says:

    @Raymond I’ve heard that it’s something to do with the amount of paint that would need to go on them. With extra paint it can affect the aerodynamics and reduce the efficiency of the engines. Although I’m a little confused as British Airways have theirs painted blue, whereas all other 787s are white.

  • Greg

    says:

    A new generation in Australian Aviation.

    This was the first B787 to land at Honolulu during it’s delivery flight.

    Well Done,

    Jetstar

  • Paul

    says:

    Nothing wrong with the paint job looks great close up just different light conditions make it look lighter.

  • mick prendergast

    says:

    i dont mind the paint scheme-kind of the opposite of qantas painting the RB 211s grey on the 747-4s and ex BA 767s.like most things it will grow on you.

  • Raymond

    says:

    Many thanks to all those who took the time to inform the reasons for this – and to the humourous explanation too! 🙂

  • PHS

    says:

    Shame the whole thing isn’t white – and a red tail with a kangaroo on it!

  • Patrick Kilby

    says:

    If you look at the specs on the Jestar site the 787 seems to have de-rated engines, as the range is much less than the maximum possible, but enough to do Honolulu and Asia, but not the US Ex Oz or Europe Ex Asia.

  • Lazybones

    says:

    @Paul + @Steve

    I haven’t seen it in the flesh yet but I also thought the paint job looked patchy. Not just in the above photos but others i’ve seen on the web.

    Also if we’re at the point where the paint job on the engines is key to the efficiency of the aircraft then we had all best look out for excess body weight charges for pax over 90kgs 🙂

  • John Harrison

    says:

    Great to see the aircraft arrive into Australia, doubt we will see the B787 in Perth any time soon.
    Question currently Jetstar charges for movies etc. With each seat with a screen in it, how will the go about
    getting passengers to pay for the movies ? Just a thought
    Good like and I am sure it will be a nicer flight than Jetstars AB320s
    And I still say this aircraft should be in Qantas colours not Jetstar, but we all know the CEO of Qantas wants to
    promote Jetstar over Qantas !!

  • ian hocking

    says:

    Hi
    just enquiring to find out when the 787 is coming into the gold coast for its dry run.

    thank you
    regards
    ian

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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