Close sidebar

Large scale US and Australia exercise in North Queensland

written by australianaviation.com.au | July 6, 2013
The USS George Washington, which will lead US participation in Exercise Talisman Saber. (US Navy)

Exercise Talisman Saber will be played out off the coast of North Queensland from July 15, bringing with it the entire complement of the US Navy 7th Carrier Group Five. Central to the deployment will be the USS George Washington, with which Australian forces will exercise.

The Townsville Bulletin reported 15 American and 11 Australian maritime assets will participate in the exercise. RAAF Base Townsville will play an important role for Talisman Saber, with the region’s High Range and Shoalwater exercise areas to be used by US and RAAF aircraft during the exercise.

The Bulletin also reported 7,000 Australian troops will participate in Talisman Saber including more than 3,000 from Townsville as well as small numbers of government and civilian representatives.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Talisman Saber spokesperson Brigadier Bob Brown said the exercise is key for Townsville soldiers as major focuses will include certifying the 3rd Brigade as a multi-role manoeuvre brigade as part of the Australian army restructuring program known as Plan Beersheba. He said another priority will be on training the future Australian Amphibious Force – the core of which is drawn from the Townsville-based 2nd Battalion Royal Australian Regiment.

“The beauty of this scale of exercise is, with the scenarios you can move from some sort of friction with an external notional country and then move to naval blockages and a humanitarian situation with refugees,” the Bulletin reported Brown as saying.

The 501st Airborne Infantry Regiment will travel from Alaska to parachute into the scenario.

In the lead-up to Talisman Saber, Dave Parer caught this US C-130 as it approaches Townsville

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

12 Comments

  • Mr Rodney Baker

    says:

    Interesting, perhaps with such a large number of ships and aircraft they could search for the missing NZ sailing boat in their spare time.

  • paul davis

    says:

    Mr baker,they have to prepare for war.

  • Mick Bravo

    says:

    According to the attached photo the US carrier is bringing F-14s! I’d trip to TVL to see them blast around for a little while.

    The exercise is also spelt Talisman sabRe. The americans always assert it is spelt ‘er’ but everytime the exercise is held on Australian soil we spell it with the proper Queen’s english.

  • John N

    says:

    Yes I’d love to see some F14’s in action too, only one problem, they have been out of service since late 2006!!

    Cheers,

    John N

  • paul davis

    says:

    Is there anyone out there that has movement info?

  • Observer

    says:

    Wondering when someone would correct thatJohn.

    Paul check out CQ planespoting or FNQ spotting I think it is, they list the arrivals and departures so far for TS13

  • John N

    says:

    Observer,

    Yes it was obviously a ‘stock’ photo from 2006 or before, there also appears to be S3’s on the deck too, which are out of service too.

    The typical USN Carrier Air Wing today may consist of Classic Hornets and Super Hornets, Growlers or Prowlers, E2 Hawkeyes, C2 Greyhound COD transports and some SH and HH type Seahawk helicopters.

    In some USN Carrier Air Wings today the only type of ‘fast’ jet on board are variants of the same airframe, eg, Super Hornets and Growlers, which is not overly exciting from an aviation enthusiast point of view these days.

    I remember 20 odd years ago when we, here in Sydney, would have regular visits of the now retired ‘non’ nuclear carriers of the Forrestal and Kitty Hawk class, the decks would be full of a much broader range of aircraft.

    I can remember being down at Garden Island on numerous occasions and walking around the flight decks looking at F14, A6, EA6, KA6, S3, E2, ‘newish’ FA18’s, C2’s, SH3 Sea Kings and maybe SH 60 Seahawks too.

    But since then we’ve had 9/11 (tighter security) and ‘open days’ appear to be a thing of the past and if I remember correctly nuclear powered ships are still banned from Sydney Harbour and unless that ever changes we are unlikely to ever see a USN Carrier in Sydney Harbour.

    Cheers,

    John N

  • paul davis

    says:

    Thanks observer.I actually checked 5 mins after posting.Cheers mate.

  • Raymond

    says:

    Mick Bravo – Actually, the spelling of ‘Saber / Sabre’ alternates each exercise, depending on whether the US or the ADF is leading the planning… when the planning is led by the US the American spelling ‘Saber’ is utilized. When Australia is leading the planning the spelling ‘Sabre’ is utilised. Also… while insisting on using proper Queen’s English, you omitted a capital first letter for ‘sabRe’, ‘americans’ and ‘english’… 🙂

  • Raymond

    says:

    John N – Speaking of open days, Garden Island and Sydney Harbour… heading to the International Fleet Review? http://www.navy.gov.au/ifr

  • John N

    says:

    Hi Raymond,

    Yes I probably will go and have a look. Last big one I remember going to see was during the 1988 Bicentennial Fleet Review.

    Can’t remember if it was then or a few years prior, but pretty sure it was 1988 (way too long ago to remember details!), but I went on board HMS Illustrious which had a deck full of Sea Harriers.

    Unfortunately this time I can’t see that any carriers will be there, maybe the USN might have an LHA/LHD.

    Maybe we could ask our Chinese friends to send down their new/old carrier!!

    I wonder if NUSHIP Canberra will be capable of sailing up from Williamstown to participate??

    Cheers,

    John N

  • Raymond

    says:

    Hello John N,

    Yes, but it doesn’t sound as though open days are a thing of the past, that’s all… just few and far between unfortunately! (The Centennial Naval Salute in 2001 during the Centenary of Federation celebrations was cancelled due to 9/11.)

    China is one of the nations participating, but I doubt they’ll be sending their ‘new’ pride and joy, lol 🙂

    Speaking of NUSHIP Canberra, I don’t think I was dreaming 🙂 ; I thought I did see something about it being there, but I can’t locate it again yet for the life of me, and it’s not currently listed at http://www.navy.gov.au/ifr-2013-participating-warships

    Also, HMAS Farncomb is listed, but I assume that while ‘warships’ will be open to the public, this won’t include submarines??

    Cheers,
    Raymond

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Large scale US and Australia exercise in North Queensland

written by australianaviation.com.au | July 6, 2013
The USS George Washington, which will lead US participation in Exercise Talisman Saber. (US Navy)

Exercise Talisman Saber will be played out off the coast of North Queensland from July 15, bringing with it the entire complement of the US Navy 7th Carrier Group Five. Central to the deployment will be the USS George Washington, with which Australian forces will exercise.

The Townsville Bulletin reported 15 American and 11 Australian maritime assets will participate in the exercise. RAAF Base Townsville will play an important role for Talisman Saber, with the region’s High Range and Shoalwater exercise areas to be used by US and RAAF aircraft during the exercise.

The Bulletin also reported 7,000 Australian troops will participate in Talisman Saber including more than 3,000 from Townsville as well as small numbers of government and civilian representatives.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Talisman Saber spokesperson Brigadier Bob Brown said the exercise is key for Townsville soldiers as major focuses will include certifying the 3rd Brigade as a multi-role manoeuvre brigade as part of the Australian army restructuring program known as Plan Beersheba. He said another priority will be on training the future Australian Amphibious Force – the core of which is drawn from the Townsville-based 2nd Battalion Royal Australian Regiment.

“The beauty of this scale of exercise is, with the scenarios you can move from some sort of friction with an external notional country and then move to naval blockages and a humanitarian situation with refugees,” the Bulletin reported Brown as saying.

The 501st Airborne Infantry Regiment will travel from Alaska to parachute into the scenario.

In the lead-up to Talisman Saber, Dave Parer caught this US C-130 as it approaches Townsville

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

12 Comments

  • Mr Rodney Baker

    says:

    Interesting, perhaps with such a large number of ships and aircraft they could search for the missing NZ sailing boat in their spare time.

  • paul davis

    says:

    Mr baker,they have to prepare for war.

  • Mick Bravo

    says:

    According to the attached photo the US carrier is bringing F-14s! I’d trip to TVL to see them blast around for a little while.

    The exercise is also spelt Talisman sabRe. The americans always assert it is spelt ‘er’ but everytime the exercise is held on Australian soil we spell it with the proper Queen’s english.

  • John N

    says:

    Yes I’d love to see some F14’s in action too, only one problem, they have been out of service since late 2006!!

    Cheers,

    John N

  • paul davis

    says:

    Is there anyone out there that has movement info?

  • Observer

    says:

    Wondering when someone would correct thatJohn.

    Paul check out CQ planespoting or FNQ spotting I think it is, they list the arrivals and departures so far for TS13

  • John N

    says:

    Observer,

    Yes it was obviously a ‘stock’ photo from 2006 or before, there also appears to be S3’s on the deck too, which are out of service too.

    The typical USN Carrier Air Wing today may consist of Classic Hornets and Super Hornets, Growlers or Prowlers, E2 Hawkeyes, C2 Greyhound COD transports and some SH and HH type Seahawk helicopters.

    In some USN Carrier Air Wings today the only type of ‘fast’ jet on board are variants of the same airframe, eg, Super Hornets and Growlers, which is not overly exciting from an aviation enthusiast point of view these days.

    I remember 20 odd years ago when we, here in Sydney, would have regular visits of the now retired ‘non’ nuclear carriers of the Forrestal and Kitty Hawk class, the decks would be full of a much broader range of aircraft.

    I can remember being down at Garden Island on numerous occasions and walking around the flight decks looking at F14, A6, EA6, KA6, S3, E2, ‘newish’ FA18’s, C2’s, SH3 Sea Kings and maybe SH 60 Seahawks too.

    But since then we’ve had 9/11 (tighter security) and ‘open days’ appear to be a thing of the past and if I remember correctly nuclear powered ships are still banned from Sydney Harbour and unless that ever changes we are unlikely to ever see a USN Carrier in Sydney Harbour.

    Cheers,

    John N

  • paul davis

    says:

    Thanks observer.I actually checked 5 mins after posting.Cheers mate.

  • Raymond

    says:

    Mick Bravo – Actually, the spelling of ‘Saber / Sabre’ alternates each exercise, depending on whether the US or the ADF is leading the planning… when the planning is led by the US the American spelling ‘Saber’ is utilized. When Australia is leading the planning the spelling ‘Sabre’ is utilised. Also… while insisting on using proper Queen’s English, you omitted a capital first letter for ‘sabRe’, ‘americans’ and ‘english’… 🙂

  • Raymond

    says:

    John N – Speaking of open days, Garden Island and Sydney Harbour… heading to the International Fleet Review? http://www.navy.gov.au/ifr

  • John N

    says:

    Hi Raymond,

    Yes I probably will go and have a look. Last big one I remember going to see was during the 1988 Bicentennial Fleet Review.

    Can’t remember if it was then or a few years prior, but pretty sure it was 1988 (way too long ago to remember details!), but I went on board HMS Illustrious which had a deck full of Sea Harriers.

    Unfortunately this time I can’t see that any carriers will be there, maybe the USN might have an LHA/LHD.

    Maybe we could ask our Chinese friends to send down their new/old carrier!!

    I wonder if NUSHIP Canberra will be capable of sailing up from Williamstown to participate??

    Cheers,

    John N

  • Raymond

    says:

    Hello John N,

    Yes, but it doesn’t sound as though open days are a thing of the past, that’s all… just few and far between unfortunately! (The Centennial Naval Salute in 2001 during the Centenary of Federation celebrations was cancelled due to 9/11.)

    China is one of the nations participating, but I doubt they’ll be sending their ‘new’ pride and joy, lol 🙂

    Speaking of NUSHIP Canberra, I don’t think I was dreaming 🙂 ; I thought I did see something about it being there, but I can’t locate it again yet for the life of me, and it’s not currently listed at http://www.navy.gov.au/ifr-2013-participating-warships

    Also, HMAS Farncomb is listed, but I assume that while ‘warships’ will be open to the public, this won’t include submarines??

    Cheers,
    Raymond

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Each day, our subscribers are more informed with the right information.

SIGN UP to the Australian Aviation magazine for high-quality news and features for just $99.95 per year