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100th F-35 enters final assembly

written by australianaviation.com.au | July 30, 2013
AF-41, the 100th F-35.

The 100th F-35 Lightning II has entered the last stage of final assembly.

The CTOL F-35A variant aircraft is due to arrive at Luke Air Force Base in Arizona in 2014, and is one of 126 F-35s currently in production, according to Lockheed Martin.

Luke AFB is set to be the largest F-35 base in the world, and will host training of US and international F-35A pilots.

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Meanwhile, the first of two F-35 test aircraft has been transferred to the Netherlands. This aircraft represents the first F-35A variant to be delivered to an international partner in the Joint Strike Fighter program.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

4 Comments

  • Dee

    says:

    100 built and counting;. can’t wait for Australia to receive their first squadron, which along with our other new platforms, will give us the air cover that this Nation needs and deserves.

  • Raymond

    says:

    I can’t wait either… a few more years for the first RAAF F-35 squadron though, unfortunately!

  • Allan

    says:

    Great job Lockheed Martin, Finally starting to see production numbers building, With the first two for Australia currently being constructed. Maybe the jet will be worth the wait if it performs as advertised. The only drawback in Australias` case is the lack of a second engine, As we are one of the few nations who will rely heavily on the reliability of the single engine on long overwater flights.

  • Raymond

    says:

    Allan – yes, I am led to believe that was part of the rationale behind our selection of the F/A-18 over the F-16, however the thinking nowadays is as engine technology is more advanced and they are much more reliable, a single engine is acceptable… I, for one, would still prefer two – things can, and do, still go wrong!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

100th F-35 enters final assembly

written by australianaviation.com.au | July 30, 2013
AF-41, the 100th F-35.

The 100th F-35 Lightning II has entered the last stage of final assembly.

The CTOL F-35A variant aircraft is due to arrive at Luke Air Force Base in Arizona in 2014, and is one of 126 F-35s currently in production, according to Lockheed Martin.

Luke AFB is set to be the largest F-35 base in the world, and will host training of US and international F-35A pilots.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Meanwhile, the first of two F-35 test aircraft has been transferred to the Netherlands. This aircraft represents the first F-35A variant to be delivered to an international partner in the Joint Strike Fighter program.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

4 Comments

  • Dee

    says:

    100 built and counting;. can’t wait for Australia to receive their first squadron, which along with our other new platforms, will give us the air cover that this Nation needs and deserves.

  • Raymond

    says:

    I can’t wait either… a few more years for the first RAAF F-35 squadron though, unfortunately!

  • Allan

    says:

    Great job Lockheed Martin, Finally starting to see production numbers building, With the first two for Australia currently being constructed. Maybe the jet will be worth the wait if it performs as advertised. The only drawback in Australias` case is the lack of a second engine, As we are one of the few nations who will rely heavily on the reliability of the single engine on long overwater flights.

  • Raymond

    says:

    Allan – yes, I am led to believe that was part of the rationale behind our selection of the F/A-18 over the F-16, however the thinking nowadays is as engine technology is more advanced and they are much more reliable, a single engine is acceptable… I, for one, would still prefer two – things can, and do, still go wrong!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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