Boeing delivers 50th 747-8

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 30, 2013
The 50th 747-8 at Boeing's new Everett Delivery Center. (Boeing)

Boeing has delivered the 50th 747-8. Almost a year after the first revenue flight of the 747-8 Intercontinental, Deutsche Lufthansa AG, the launch customer, took delivery of the milestone aircraft – the airline’s seventh 747-8 and its 82nd 747.

“After one year of operation and now seven aircraft in the fleet, the aircraft has proven and delivered excellent economical and ecological performance. We are very happy with the reliable operation of the 747-8,” said Lufthansa’s Nico Buchholz, executive vice president fleet management.

Eric Lindblad, vice president and general manager, 747 program added: “This delivery is not only an important milestone for the 747-8 program, but it sets the stage for our future. We will be building and delivering the 747-8 for decades to come.”

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Boeing delivered the first 747-8 Intercontinental to Lufthansa in April 2012. The aircraft entered service on June 1 2012 with a flight from Frankfurt to Washington DC. Cargolux Airlines took delivery of the first 747-8 Freighter in October 2011. To date, 35 Freighters and 15 Intercontinentals, including eight of the Boeing Business Jet version, have been delivered.

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8 Comments

  • Ron

    says:

    So excluding freighters & BBJ’s, that means that Lufthansa is the only airline customer? Not exactly a glowing endorsement, compared to the growing backlog of orders for 777’s & 787’s, which they certainly will be building for “decades” (maybe one or two) to come. Bit optimistic to say the same about the 747-8 passenger version at this stage. With the A380F still shelved, there will still be a good market for the freighter as a 747-400F replacement over the next decade, although the 777F may eat into that too. But as far as the Intercontinental is concerned, you can teach an old dog as many new tricks as you like, but does anyone care for it anymore?

  • Alex

    says:

    Cathay also has the 747-8, so that makes two airlines

  • Adam

    says:

    Cathay’s are freighters though..
    Air China and Korean Air both have the 747-8i on order.

  • Peter

    says:

    Still old technology.

  • Mick

    says:

    I think the 748 looks great! Although not many 748i have been ordered, the freighter is doing well! A combination of 777 and 787 technology in the flight deck makes it very appealing to pilots. And for 744 pilots it would be an easy transition to the 748.

  • John

    says:

    Peter said, “Still old technology”.

    It’s technology that makes it significantly more efficient than the A380. The A380 basic weight is almost 100 tonnes heavier than the B747-8i and simply is not efficient on longer sectors (ie over 12 hours). I believe the low order status is due to it being offered a few years after most major airlines had committed to the A380 and also due to the efficiency & range of the new twins being developed (B787 & A350).

    I don’t expect many more A380’s will be ordered.

  • David

    says:

    Still nice to see the 747 still in the air. Wonder if QANTAS will buy them as a 747400 replacement?

  • charles

    says:

    747 is old technology, and the A380’s will keep on being ordered. The A380 is one of the most efficient aircraft flying, especially when it can take as many passengers as the 747 but with luxuries. The 747 is a dying aircraft and the low orders on this “new” version of it only proves it. If it’s such a good aircraft, then why are not more airlines ordering it such as British Airways or Qantas not ordering them. Oh yeah, they are choosing the A380 to replace them over time….

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