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New CASA maintenance regulations come into effect

written by australianaviation.com.au | June 27, 2011

CASA’s new suite of maintenance regulations for regular public transport (RPT) operations – covering continuing airworthiness requirements (Part 42), approved maintenance organisations (Part 145), maintenance personnel licensing (Part 66), and maintenance training organisations (Part 147) – came into effect on June 27.

The rules, which are being phased in over a two year period, are based on European EASA regulations, and have seen over 7000 LAMEs issued with their new licences under Part 66.

“The regulations will deliver a clearer focus on safety outcomes, while allowing maintenance organisations flexibility in the way they conduct their operations,” CASA said in a statement.

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AMROBA, the Aviation Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul Business Association, has been critical of the changes, noting on its website that, “all the risks associated with the introduction of these new rules have not been addressed. These rules were supposed to ‘harmonise’ with the EASA maintenance regulations but, once again, are unique and will not assist with harmonisation with EASA or the FAA…”

Claims AMROBA, “Unlike the EASA regulations they are based on, the increased regulatory imposts of these regulations will further increase costs with no improvement in safety.”

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New CASA maintenance regulations come into effect

written by australianaviation.com.au | June 27, 2011

CASA’s new suite of maintenance regulations for regular public transport (RPT) operations – covering continuing airworthiness requirements (Part 42), approved maintenance organisations (Part 145), maintenance personnel licensing (Part 66), and maintenance training organisations (Part 147) – came into effect on June 27.

The rules, which are being phased in over a two year period, are based on European EASA regulations, and have seen over 7000 LAMEs issued with their new licences under Part 66.

“The regulations will deliver a clearer focus on safety outcomes, while allowing maintenance organisations flexibility in the way they conduct their operations,” CASA said in a statement.

Advertisement
Advertisement

AMROBA, the Aviation Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul Business Association, has been critical of the changes, noting on its website that, “all the risks associated with the introduction of these new rules have not been addressed. These rules were supposed to ‘harmonise’ with the EASA maintenance regulations but, once again, are unique and will not assist with harmonisation with EASA or the FAA…”

Claims AMROBA, “Unlike the EASA regulations they are based on, the increased regulatory imposts of these regulations will further increase costs with no improvement in safety.”

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

New CASA maintenance regulations come into effect

written by australianaviation.com.au | June 27, 2011

CASA’s new suite of maintenance regulations for regular public transport (RPT) operations – covering continuing airworthiness requirements (Part 42), approved maintenance organisations (Part 145), maintenance personnel licensing (Part 66), and maintenance training organisations (Part 147) – came into effect on June 27.

The rules, which are being phased in over a two year period, are based on European EASA regulations, and have seen over 7000 LAMEs issued with their new licences under Part 66.

“The regulations will deliver a clearer focus on safety outcomes, while allowing maintenance organisations flexibility in the way they conduct their operations,” CASA said in a statement.

Advertisement
Advertisement

AMROBA, the Aviation Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul Business Association, has been critical of the changes, noting on its website that, “all the risks associated with the introduction of these new rules have not been addressed. These rules were supposed to ‘harmonise’ with the EASA maintenance regulations but, once again, are unique and will not assist with harmonisation with EASA or the FAA…”

Claims AMROBA, “Unlike the EASA regulations they are based on, the increased regulatory imposts of these regulations will further increase costs with no improvement in safety.”

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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