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Cracks found in 767 engine pylons

written by australianaviation.com.au | June 23, 2010
A 767-300 in Boeing house colours. (Boeing)

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with Boeing and American Airlines (AA) to remedy structural cracks found on the engine pylons on at least two of the airline’s Boeing 767s discovered during recent maintenance checks.

According to a report from Reuters, the cracks were discovered by FAA inspectors while working on a different part of the aircraft during a routine inspection. The aircraft with the cracking were not yet due for a scheduled inspection which would have found the potentially catastrophic cracks.

“We are working with the carrier and the manufacturer to identify the source of the cracking and to develop remedies,” an FAA spokesperson said. “We are also considering additional action, including requiring more frequent inspections of the engine pylon area.”

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Currently, no other 767 operators have reported cracking issues related to those discovered on the American aircraft. American operates a fleet of 73 767-200s and -300s, all of which are powered by General Electric CF6 engines.

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Cracks found in 767 engine pylons

written by australianaviation.com.au | June 23, 2010
A 767-300 in Boeing house colours. (Boeing)

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with Boeing and American Airlines (AA) to remedy structural cracks found on the engine pylons on at least two of the airline’s Boeing 767s discovered during recent maintenance checks.

According to a report from Reuters, the cracks were discovered by FAA inspectors while working on a different part of the aircraft during a routine inspection. The aircraft with the cracking were not yet due for a scheduled inspection which would have found the potentially catastrophic cracks.

“We are working with the carrier and the manufacturer to identify the source of the cracking and to develop remedies,” an FAA spokesperson said. “We are also considering additional action, including requiring more frequent inspections of the engine pylon area.”

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Currently, no other 767 operators have reported cracking issues related to those discovered on the American aircraft. American operates a fleet of 73 767-200s and -300s, all of which are powered by General Electric CF6 engines.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

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