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Boeing unveils Phantom Ray

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 11, 2010
The Phantom Ray was developed by Boeing's Phantom Works. (Boeing)
The Phantom Ray was developed by Boeing's Phantom Works. (Boeing)

Boeing’s Phantom Works unit has unveiled its Phantom Ray unmanned advanced technology demonstrator which could take on a range of high risk combat operations in future years.

The privately financed aircraft has been developed from the X-45C program which the Phantom Works had developed for  DARPA’s Joint-Unmanned Combat Air System (J-UCAS) project, and was built by Boeing at St Louis.

“Phantom Ray offers a host of options for our customers as a testbed for advanced technologies, including intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; suppression of enemy air defences; electronic attack and autonomous aerial refueling – the possibilities are nearly endless,” said Dennis Muilenburg, president and CEO of Boeing Defense, Space & Security.

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The aircraft, which measures 15.42m long and has a wing span of 10.9m, is scheduled to make its first taxi tests during the northern summer, ahead of a planned first flight in December.

Boeing unveils Phantom Ray

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 11, 2010
The Phantom Ray was developed by Boeing's Phantom Works. (Boeing)
The Phantom Ray was developed by Boeing's Phantom Works. (Boeing)

Boeing’s Phantom Works unit has unveiled its Phantom Ray unmanned advanced technology demonstrator which could take on a range of high risk combat operations in future years.

The privately financed aircraft has been developed from the X-45C program which the Phantom Works had developed for  DARPA’s Joint-Unmanned Combat Air System (J-UCAS) project, and was built by Boeing at St Louis.

“Phantom Ray offers a host of options for our customers as a testbed for advanced technologies, including intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; suppression of enemy air defences; electronic attack and autonomous aerial refueling – the possibilities are nearly endless,” said Dennis Muilenburg, president and CEO of Boeing Defense, Space & Security.

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The aircraft, which measures 15.42m long and has a wing span of 10.9m, is scheduled to make its first taxi tests during the northern summer, ahead of a planned first flight in December.

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