Close sidebar

747-8 hits design turbulence

written by australianaviation.com.au | March 26, 2010
photo - Boeing
photo - Boeing

Boeing has confirmed a report from Flightblogger that it is working on a design fix for the 747-8 following unexpected buffeting during test flying, potentially putting pressure on the delayed airliner’s expected certification and delivery dates.

The issue surfaced on the first flight of the first 747-8 Freighter on February 10, and occurred when the aircraft’s flaps were extended to maximum deflection at 30 degrees while the landing gear was down. The reportedly “very apparent” buffeting was traced back to disruptive airflow caused by the aircraft’s outboard landing gear doors.

Boeing is understood to be examining different solutions to the issue, such as reducing the maximum deflection of the double slotted flaps to 27 degrees. Sources claim that an alternative solution involving adding vortex generators to the inboard flaps to redirect airflow has been ruled out due to complications it would create with the overwing emergency exit slides.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

747-8 hits design turbulence

written by australianaviation.com.au | March 26, 2010
photo - Boeing
photo - Boeing

Boeing has confirmed a report from Flightblogger that it is working on a design fix for the 747-8 following unexpected buffeting during test flying, potentially putting pressure on the delayed airliner’s expected certification and delivery dates.

The issue surfaced on the first flight of the first 747-8 Freighter on February 10, and occurred when the aircraft’s flaps were extended to maximum deflection at 30 degrees while the landing gear was down. The reportedly “very apparent” buffeting was traced back to disruptive airflow caused by the aircraft’s outboard landing gear doors.

Boeing is understood to be examining different solutions to the issue, such as reducing the maximum deflection of the double slotted flaps to 27 degrees. Sources claim that an alternative solution involving adding vortex generators to the inboard flaps to redirect airflow has been ruled out due to complications it would create with the overwing emergency exit slides.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

Each day, our subscribers are more informed with the right information.

SIGN UP to the Australian Aviation magazine for high-quality news and features for just $99.95 per year