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Boeing 777-9X suffers setback during static testing

written by australianaviation.com.au | September 9, 2019
A file image of the first Boeing 777-9X being rolled out at a staff-only event in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)
A file image of the first Boeing 777-9X being rolled out at a staff-only event in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)

A cargo door on a Boeing 777-9X static test aircraft separated from the fuselage during a high-pressure test as part of the aircraft certification program, media reports say.

The incident occurred on Thursday (US time) at Boeing’s Everett facility in the presence of representatives from the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), according to KOMO journalist Charlie Hager on Twitter.

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The static test aircraft emerged from Boeing’s final assembly line in September 2018. It will never fly. Instead, it was being used to test the structural limits of the airframe.

Boeing confirmed an incident occurred during ground testing in a statement to The Seattle Times, without offering specifics.

“During final load testing on the 777X static test airplane, the team encountered an issue that required suspension of the test,” Boeing told the newspaper.

“The event is under review and the team is working to understand root cause.”

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Further, the airframer said the testing conditions were well beyond any load expected in commercial service.

The newspaper said there were no injuries resulting from the door explosion.

Boeing's first completed 777-9X aircraft. (Boeing/Twitter)
Boeing’s first completed 777-9X aircraft. (Boeing/Twitter)

The incident is the latest setback for the 777-X program, which has already been forced to delay first flight from the middle of calendar 2019 to early 2020 due to issues with the aircraft’s GE9X engine’s compressor. Despite the delays, Boeing said recently it was still targeting 2020 for first delivery of the 777-9X.

In August, Boeing said it had pushed back the timeline for the entry-into-service of its 777-8X ultra-long range widebody to “reduce risk” in the program. The airframer said the decision to delay first delivery of the 777-8X followed a review of the “development program schedule and the needs of our current 777X customers”.

https://www.facebook.com/Boeing/videos/vb.115537125141500/450911565455572

THE 777-X IS A TWO-AIRCRAFT FAMILY

Launched in 2013, the 777-X family of aircraft comprise the 777-8X and 777-9X variants. The pair is an upgrade from Boeing’s in-production 777-200LR and and 777-300ER.

In addition to the new GE Aviation GE9X engines, features of the 777-X family included composite wings with folding wingtips to maintain its Code E rating at airports, as well as in-cabin enhancements such as larger overhead stowage and a wider cross section.

A file image of the GE Aviation GE9X engine at the staff-only roll-out event for the first Boeing 777-9X in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)
A file image of the GE Aviation GE9X engine at the staff-only roll-out event for the first Boeing 777-9X in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)

The 777-9X is 77 metres in length and has a total wingspan of 72 metres with its wingtips extended. It is capable of flying 7,285nm when carrying 426 passengers in a two-class configuration, according to Boeing figures.

It has been pitched as the ideal replacement for the very large aircraft segment of the market, especially in light of Airbus’s decision to cancel the A380 program.

Meanwhile, the 777-8X is still in development. The Boeing website lists the aircraft as having a range of 8,690nm and a passenger capacity of 384 passengers in a two-class layout. In addition to being a candidate for Qantas’s Project Sunrise, the 777-8X is also a potential replacement for the in-service Boeing 777-300ER.

The 777-X program had received 344 orders at July 31 2019 according to the Boeing website.

An artist's impression of the Boeing777-9X and 777-8X. (Boeing)
An artist’s impression of the Boeing777-9X and 777-8X. (Boeing)

Fly into Spring with Australian Aviation’s latest print edition. Starting from $49.95 a year, you can read comprehensive coverage on all sectors of the industry to keep you in the loop. Get your hands on the subscription today. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

4 Comments

  • Alan

    says:

    Embarrassing!

  • Mac Carter

    says:

    No doubt this issue will be rectified well before the aircraft begins commercial service.
    Boeing can’t afford another design fault debacle.

  • Craigy

    says:

    This was static testing where is not unusual to find problems. There was a door problem with B777 when it was being developed where when the fuselage was pressurised the door failed causing depressurisation. So is this really a setback in the big scheme of things?

  • AlanH

    says:

    Better to have it happen in a static test than at FL380!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Boeing 777-9X suffers setback during static testing

written by australianaviation.com.au | September 9, 2019
A file image of the first Boeing 777-9X being rolled out at a staff-only event in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)
A file image of the first Boeing 777-9X being rolled out at a staff-only event in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)

A cargo door on a Boeing 777-9X static test aircraft separated from the fuselage during a high-pressure test as part of the aircraft certification program, media reports say.

The incident occurred on Thursday (US time) at Boeing’s Everett facility in the presence of representatives from the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), according to KOMO journalist Charlie Hager on Twitter.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The static test aircraft emerged from Boeing’s final assembly line in September 2018. It will never fly. Instead, it was being used to test the structural limits of the airframe.

Boeing confirmed an incident occurred during ground testing in a statement to The Seattle Times, without offering specifics.

“During final load testing on the 777X static test airplane, the team encountered an issue that required suspension of the test,” Boeing told the newspaper.

“The event is under review and the team is working to understand root cause.”

PROMOTED CONTENT

Further, the airframer said the testing conditions were well beyond any load expected in commercial service.

The newspaper said there were no injuries resulting from the door explosion.

Boeing's first completed 777-9X aircraft. (Boeing/Twitter)
Boeing’s first completed 777-9X aircraft. (Boeing/Twitter)

The incident is the latest setback for the 777-X program, which has already been forced to delay first flight from the middle of calendar 2019 to early 2020 due to issues with the aircraft’s GE9X engine’s compressor. Despite the delays, Boeing said recently it was still targeting 2020 for first delivery of the 777-9X.

In August, Boeing said it had pushed back the timeline for the entry-into-service of its 777-8X ultra-long range widebody to “reduce risk” in the program. The airframer said the decision to delay first delivery of the 777-8X followed a review of the “development program schedule and the needs of our current 777X customers”.

https://www.facebook.com/Boeing/videos/vb.115537125141500/450911565455572

THE 777-X IS A TWO-AIRCRAFT FAMILY

Launched in 2013, the 777-X family of aircraft comprise the 777-8X and 777-9X variants. The pair is an upgrade from Boeing’s in-production 777-200LR and and 777-300ER.

In addition to the new GE Aviation GE9X engines, features of the 777-X family included composite wings with folding wingtips to maintain its Code E rating at airports, as well as in-cabin enhancements such as larger overhead stowage and a wider cross section.

A file image of the GE Aviation GE9X engine at the staff-only roll-out event for the first Boeing 777-9X in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)
A file image of the GE Aviation GE9X engine at the staff-only roll-out event for the first Boeing 777-9X in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)

The 777-9X is 77 metres in length and has a total wingspan of 72 metres with its wingtips extended. It is capable of flying 7,285nm when carrying 426 passengers in a two-class configuration, according to Boeing figures.

It has been pitched as the ideal replacement for the very large aircraft segment of the market, especially in light of Airbus’s decision to cancel the A380 program.

Meanwhile, the 777-8X is still in development. The Boeing website lists the aircraft as having a range of 8,690nm and a passenger capacity of 384 passengers in a two-class layout. In addition to being a candidate for Qantas’s Project Sunrise, the 777-8X is also a potential replacement for the in-service Boeing 777-300ER.

The 777-X program had received 344 orders at July 31 2019 according to the Boeing website.

An artist's impression of the Boeing777-9X and 777-8X. (Boeing)
An artist’s impression of the Boeing777-9X and 777-8X. (Boeing)

Fly into Spring with Australian Aviation’s latest print edition. Starting from $49.95 a year, you can read comprehensive coverage on all sectors of the industry to keep you in the loop. Get your hands on the subscription today. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

4 Comments

  • Alan

    says:

    Embarrassing!

  • Mac Carter

    says:

    No doubt this issue will be rectified well before the aircraft begins commercial service.
    Boeing can’t afford another design fault debacle.

  • Craigy

    says:

    This was static testing where is not unusual to find problems. There was a door problem with B777 when it was being developed where when the fuselage was pressurised the door failed causing depressurisation. So is this really a setback in the big scheme of things?

  • AlanH

    says:

    Better to have it happen in a static test than at FL380!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Boeing 777-9X suffers setback during static testing

written by australianaviation.com.au | September 9, 2019
A file image of the first Boeing 777-9X being rolled out at a staff-only event in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)
A file image of the first Boeing 777-9X being rolled out at a staff-only event in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)

A cargo door on a Boeing 777-9X static test aircraft separated from the fuselage during a high-pressure test as part of the aircraft certification program, media reports say.

The incident occurred on Thursday (US time) at Boeing’s Everett facility in the presence of representatives from the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), according to KOMO journalist Charlie Hager on Twitter.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The static test aircraft emerged from Boeing’s final assembly line in September 2018. It will never fly. Instead, it was being used to test the structural limits of the airframe.

Boeing confirmed an incident occurred during ground testing in a statement to The Seattle Times, without offering specifics.

“During final load testing on the 777X static test airplane, the team encountered an issue that required suspension of the test,” Boeing told the newspaper.

“The event is under review and the team is working to understand root cause.”

PROMOTED CONTENT

Further, the airframer said the testing conditions were well beyond any load expected in commercial service.

The newspaper said there were no injuries resulting from the door explosion.

Boeing's first completed 777-9X aircraft. (Boeing/Twitter)
Boeing’s first completed 777-9X aircraft. (Boeing/Twitter)

The incident is the latest setback for the 777-X program, which has already been forced to delay first flight from the middle of calendar 2019 to early 2020 due to issues with the aircraft’s GE9X engine’s compressor. Despite the delays, Boeing said recently it was still targeting 2020 for first delivery of the 777-9X.

In August, Boeing said it had pushed back the timeline for the entry-into-service of its 777-8X ultra-long range widebody to “reduce risk” in the program. The airframer said the decision to delay first delivery of the 777-8X followed a review of the “development program schedule and the needs of our current 777X customers”.

https://www.facebook.com/Boeing/videos/vb.115537125141500/450911565455572

THE 777-X IS A TWO-AIRCRAFT FAMILY

Launched in 2013, the 777-X family of aircraft comprise the 777-8X and 777-9X variants. The pair is an upgrade from Boeing’s in-production 777-200LR and and 777-300ER.

In addition to the new GE Aviation GE9X engines, features of the 777-X family included composite wings with folding wingtips to maintain its Code E rating at airports, as well as in-cabin enhancements such as larger overhead stowage and a wider cross section.

A file image of the GE Aviation GE9X engine at the staff-only roll-out event for the first Boeing 777-9X in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)
A file image of the GE Aviation GE9X engine at the staff-only roll-out event for the first Boeing 777-9X in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)

The 777-9X is 77 metres in length and has a total wingspan of 72 metres with its wingtips extended. It is capable of flying 7,285nm when carrying 426 passengers in a two-class configuration, according to Boeing figures.

It has been pitched as the ideal replacement for the very large aircraft segment of the market, especially in light of Airbus’s decision to cancel the A380 program.

Meanwhile, the 777-8X is still in development. The Boeing website lists the aircraft as having a range of 8,690nm and a passenger capacity of 384 passengers in a two-class layout. In addition to being a candidate for Qantas’s Project Sunrise, the 777-8X is also a potential replacement for the in-service Boeing 777-300ER.

The 777-X program had received 344 orders at July 31 2019 according to the Boeing website.

An artist's impression of the Boeing777-9X and 777-8X. (Boeing)
An artist’s impression of the Boeing777-9X and 777-8X. (Boeing)

Fly into Spring with Australian Aviation’s latest print edition. Starting from $49.95 a year, you can read comprehensive coverage on all sectors of the industry to keep you in the loop. Get your hands on the subscription today. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

4 Comments

  • Alan

    says:

    Embarrassing!

  • Mac Carter

    says:

    No doubt this issue will be rectified well before the aircraft begins commercial service.
    Boeing can’t afford another design fault debacle.

  • Craigy

    says:

    This was static testing where is not unusual to find problems. There was a door problem with B777 when it was being developed where when the fuselage was pressurised the door failed causing depressurisation. So is this really a setback in the big scheme of things?

  • AlanH

    says:

    Better to have it happen in a static test than at FL380!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Boeing 777-9X suffers setback during static testing

written by australianaviation.com.au | September 9, 2019
A file image of the first Boeing 777-9X being rolled out at a staff-only event in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)
A file image of the first Boeing 777-9X being rolled out at a staff-only event in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)

A cargo door on a Boeing 777-9X static test aircraft separated from the fuselage during a high-pressure test as part of the aircraft certification program, media reports say.

The incident occurred on Thursday (US time) at Boeing’s Everett facility in the presence of representatives from the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), according to KOMO journalist Charlie Hager on Twitter.

Advertisement
Advertisement

The static test aircraft emerged from Boeing’s final assembly line in September 2018. It will never fly. Instead, it was being used to test the structural limits of the airframe.

Boeing confirmed an incident occurred during ground testing in a statement to The Seattle Times, without offering specifics.

“During final load testing on the 777X static test airplane, the team encountered an issue that required suspension of the test,” Boeing told the newspaper.

“The event is under review and the team is working to understand root cause.”

PROMOTED CONTENT

Further, the airframer said the testing conditions were well beyond any load expected in commercial service.

The newspaper said there were no injuries resulting from the door explosion.

Boeing's first completed 777-9X aircraft. (Boeing/Twitter)
Boeing’s first completed 777-9X aircraft. (Boeing/Twitter)

The incident is the latest setback for the 777-X program, which has already been forced to delay first flight from the middle of calendar 2019 to early 2020 due to issues with the aircraft’s GE9X engine’s compressor. Despite the delays, Boeing said recently it was still targeting 2020 for first delivery of the 777-9X.

In August, Boeing said it had pushed back the timeline for the entry-into-service of its 777-8X ultra-long range widebody to “reduce risk” in the program. The airframer said the decision to delay first delivery of the 777-8X followed a review of the “development program schedule and the needs of our current 777X customers”.

https://www.facebook.com/Boeing/videos/vb.115537125141500/450911565455572

THE 777-X IS A TWO-AIRCRAFT FAMILY

Launched in 2013, the 777-X family of aircraft comprise the 777-8X and 777-9X variants. The pair is an upgrade from Boeing’s in-production 777-200LR and and 777-300ER.

In addition to the new GE Aviation GE9X engines, features of the 777-X family included composite wings with folding wingtips to maintain its Code E rating at airports, as well as in-cabin enhancements such as larger overhead stowage and a wider cross section.

A file image of the GE Aviation GE9X engine at the staff-only roll-out event for the first Boeing 777-9X in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)
A file image of the GE Aviation GE9X engine at the staff-only roll-out event for the first Boeing 777-9X in March 2019. (Wikimedia Commons/Dan Nevill)

The 777-9X is 77 metres in length and has a total wingspan of 72 metres with its wingtips extended. It is capable of flying 7,285nm when carrying 426 passengers in a two-class configuration, according to Boeing figures.

It has been pitched as the ideal replacement for the very large aircraft segment of the market, especially in light of Airbus’s decision to cancel the A380 program.

Meanwhile, the 777-8X is still in development. The Boeing website lists the aircraft as having a range of 8,690nm and a passenger capacity of 384 passengers in a two-class layout. In addition to being a candidate for Qantas’s Project Sunrise, the 777-8X is also a potential replacement for the in-service Boeing 777-300ER.

The 777-X program had received 344 orders at July 31 2019 according to the Boeing website.

An artist's impression of the Boeing777-9X and 777-8X. (Boeing)
An artist’s impression of the Boeing777-9X and 777-8X. (Boeing)

Fly into Spring with Australian Aviation’s latest print edition. Starting from $49.95 a year, you can read comprehensive coverage on all sectors of the industry to keep you in the loop. Get your hands on the subscription today. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

4 Comments

  • Alan

    says:

    Embarrassing!

  • Mac Carter

    says:

    No doubt this issue will be rectified well before the aircraft begins commercial service.
    Boeing can’t afford another design fault debacle.

  • Craigy

    says:

    This was static testing where is not unusual to find problems. There was a door problem with B777 when it was being developed where when the fuselage was pressurised the door failed causing depressurisation. So is this really a setback in the big scheme of things?

  • AlanH

    says:

    Better to have it happen in a static test than at FL380!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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