Close sidebar

Cathay Pacific takes delivery of its first Airbus A350-1000

written by australianaviation.com.au | June 20, 2018
Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000 B-LXA at Toulouse. (Cathay Pacific)
Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000 B-LXA at Toulouse. (Cathay Pacific)

Cathay Pacific has become the second airline in the world and first in Asia-Pacific to take delivery of the Airbus A350-1000.

The delivery flight of B-LXA took off from Airbus’s Toulouse headquarters with airline staff and media on board a little after 1440 on Tuesday (European time), landing at Hong Kong Airport about 12 hours later on Wednesday morning.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Some scenes from the delivery flight and arrival in Hong Kong on Twitter from CAPA – Centre for Aviation analyst Will Horton, and South China Morning Post reporter Danny Lee, who were on the delivery flight.

Cathay Pacific has 20 A350-1000s on order, with eight of the type to be delivered by the end of calendar 2018 and the remaining 12 to arrive by 2021.

The A350-1000 is 73.78m in length, 6.98m longer than the A350-900, and is designed to fly 7,950nm carrying 366 passengers, according to Airbus figures.

PROMOTED CONTENT

Cathay Pacific has configured its A350-1000 to carry 334 passengers comprising 46 business in a 1-2-1 layout with direct aisle access for every passenger, 32 in premium economy at eight abreast and 256 in economy with nine seats per row.

It has 54 more seats than Cathay Pacific’s 280-seat A350-900s (38 business, 28 premium economy and 214 economy).

Cathay Pacific chief customer and commercial officer Paul Loo said the entry-into-service of the A350-1000 built upon the airline’s successful induction of A350-900, which had allowed the airline to expand its long-haul network at a “near unprecedented rate”.

“The -1000 is very similar to the -900 in terms of its operational excellence,” Loo said in a statement.

“It has an incredible range, is remarkably fuel efficient and quiet, provides customers with an unsurpassed cabin environment and has extremely attractive operating economics.”

A look at the Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000

The A350-900, which Cathay Pacific began operating in May 2016, has led to new nonstop services from Hong Kong to Barcelona, Brussels, Christchurch, Copenhagen, Dublin, London Gatwick and Tel Aviv. The airline currently has 22 A350-900s in its fleet.

It has also been used to upgauge flights to Australia, with the A350-900 replacing 251-seat Airbus A330-300s (39 business, 21 premium economy, 191 economy) on some flights to Brisbane, Melbourne and Perth.

Cathay Pacific general manager for South West Pacific Rakesh Raicar said in February the A350-1000 could potentially be used on the Hong Kong-Sydney route, which is currently served three times daily with three-class 340-seat Boeing 777-300ERs, (40 business, 32 premium economy, 268 economy) and once daily with the A330-300.

“That one flight we are still operating with the A330, I don’t need to make any guesses what the planning could be for 2018,” Raicar told reporters in Sydney on February 1.

“It’s not confirmed, but I would say that’s an ideal candidate for an A350-1000, so Sydney might see an A350-1000 this year.

“It is in the planning stage. We are very gung-ho about it.”

Cathay Pacific has utilised all available traffic rights to Australia for Hong Kong-based carriers, meaning the only way to grow its presence is to utilise larger aircraft.

A350-1000 to launch Hong Kong-Washington DC

The A350-1000 will initially be used on short-haul flights to Taipei starting in July. The first long-haul route will be Hong Kong-Washington DC, which is set to begin in September 2018. At 7,085nm, it will be the longest route by distance in the airline’s network.

Other destinations due to receive A350-1000 service in the period ahead included Amsterdam, Madrid, Manchester, Tel Aviv and Zurich.

As with the delivery of all of Cathay Pacific’s 22 A350-900s, the delivery flight of B-LXA included the use of a biofuel blend to power the aircraft’s two Rolls-Royce Trent XWB-97 engines.

Qatar Airways was the launch customer for the A350-1000, with the airline taking delivery of the first of the type in February 2018.

At May 31 2018, Airbus had secured 847 orders A350, comprising 679 for the A350-900 and 168 for the A350-1000. Of those 174 aircraft have been delivered.


VIDEO: A look at the making of Cathay Pacific’s first Airbus A350-1000 from Airbus’s YouTube channel.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

7 Comments

  • Patrick Kilby

    says:

    Interesting that Qatar is not seen as part of the Asia Pacific. Qatar is in Asia, so where does Asia Pacific begin and end.

  • Craigy

    says:

    Qatar is in the middle east. It is not part of the Asia Pacific region

  • Lechuga

    says:

    @Patrick Kilby Is assume Asia pacific ends at the Indian Ocean. India and west from there would be classed as another area.

  • Dom

    says:

    Patrick…. Maybe once it turns into the Indian Ocean?!?!?
    Also just on an editorial note, the dates for delivery should be 2018 not 2108….. unless they are waiting a while on parts…lol
    Looks like a nice aircraft…. say goodbye to four engines for good by the looks…

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Hi Dom,
      Apologies for the error. The story has been updated.

  • Craigy

    says:

    It is interesting that Airbus are now saying that they are looking at the A350 XWB as a whole to meet Qantas’ Project Sunrise. Given the limitations of the A350-900ULR outlined in the latest ULR spec (no forward cargo hold), it seems that Airbus are looking more at what they can do to tweek the A350-1000 to meet sunrise’s requirements and follow on ULR needs of other airlines such as ANZ and UAL for starters.

  • NJP

    says:

    What is the performance of the a350 engine v the GE90 on the 777/77x ?

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cathay Pacific takes delivery of its first Airbus A350-1000

written by australianaviation.com.au | June 20, 2018
Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000 B-LXA at Toulouse. (Cathay Pacific)
Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000 B-LXA at Toulouse. (Cathay Pacific)

Cathay Pacific has become the second airline in the world and first in Asia-Pacific to take delivery of the Airbus A350-1000.

The delivery flight of B-LXA took off from Airbus’s Toulouse headquarters with airline staff and media on board a little after 1440 on Tuesday (European time), landing at Hong Kong Airport about 12 hours later on Wednesday morning.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Some scenes from the delivery flight and arrival in Hong Kong on Twitter from CAPA – Centre for Aviation analyst Will Horton, and South China Morning Post reporter Danny Lee, who were on the delivery flight.

Cathay Pacific has 20 A350-1000s on order, with eight of the type to be delivered by the end of calendar 2018 and the remaining 12 to arrive by 2021.

The A350-1000 is 73.78m in length, 6.98m longer than the A350-900, and is designed to fly 7,950nm carrying 366 passengers, according to Airbus figures.

PROMOTED CONTENT

Cathay Pacific has configured its A350-1000 to carry 334 passengers comprising 46 business in a 1-2-1 layout with direct aisle access for every passenger, 32 in premium economy at eight abreast and 256 in economy with nine seats per row.

It has 54 more seats than Cathay Pacific’s 280-seat A350-900s (38 business, 28 premium economy and 214 economy).

Cathay Pacific chief customer and commercial officer Paul Loo said the entry-into-service of the A350-1000 built upon the airline’s successful induction of A350-900, which had allowed the airline to expand its long-haul network at a “near unprecedented rate”.

“The -1000 is very similar to the -900 in terms of its operational excellence,” Loo said in a statement.

“It has an incredible range, is remarkably fuel efficient and quiet, provides customers with an unsurpassed cabin environment and has extremely attractive operating economics.”

A look at the Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000

The A350-900, which Cathay Pacific began operating in May 2016, has led to new nonstop services from Hong Kong to Barcelona, Brussels, Christchurch, Copenhagen, Dublin, London Gatwick and Tel Aviv. The airline currently has 22 A350-900s in its fleet.

It has also been used to upgauge flights to Australia, with the A350-900 replacing 251-seat Airbus A330-300s (39 business, 21 premium economy, 191 economy) on some flights to Brisbane, Melbourne and Perth.

Cathay Pacific general manager for South West Pacific Rakesh Raicar said in February the A350-1000 could potentially be used on the Hong Kong-Sydney route, which is currently served three times daily with three-class 340-seat Boeing 777-300ERs, (40 business, 32 premium economy, 268 economy) and once daily with the A330-300.

“That one flight we are still operating with the A330, I don’t need to make any guesses what the planning could be for 2018,” Raicar told reporters in Sydney on February 1.

“It’s not confirmed, but I would say that’s an ideal candidate for an A350-1000, so Sydney might see an A350-1000 this year.

“It is in the planning stage. We are very gung-ho about it.”

Cathay Pacific has utilised all available traffic rights to Australia for Hong Kong-based carriers, meaning the only way to grow its presence is to utilise larger aircraft.

A350-1000 to launch Hong Kong-Washington DC

The A350-1000 will initially be used on short-haul flights to Taipei starting in July. The first long-haul route will be Hong Kong-Washington DC, which is set to begin in September 2018. At 7,085nm, it will be the longest route by distance in the airline’s network.

Other destinations due to receive A350-1000 service in the period ahead included Amsterdam, Madrid, Manchester, Tel Aviv and Zurich.

As with the delivery of all of Cathay Pacific’s 22 A350-900s, the delivery flight of B-LXA included the use of a biofuel blend to power the aircraft’s two Rolls-Royce Trent XWB-97 engines.

Qatar Airways was the launch customer for the A350-1000, with the airline taking delivery of the first of the type in February 2018.

At May 31 2018, Airbus had secured 847 orders A350, comprising 679 for the A350-900 and 168 for the A350-1000. Of those 174 aircraft have been delivered.


VIDEO: A look at the making of Cathay Pacific’s first Airbus A350-1000 from Airbus’s YouTube channel.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

7 Comments

  • Patrick Kilby

    says:

    Interesting that Qatar is not seen as part of the Asia Pacific. Qatar is in Asia, so where does Asia Pacific begin and end.

  • Craigy

    says:

    Qatar is in the middle east. It is not part of the Asia Pacific region

  • Lechuga

    says:

    @Patrick Kilby Is assume Asia pacific ends at the Indian Ocean. India and west from there would be classed as another area.

  • Dom

    says:

    Patrick…. Maybe once it turns into the Indian Ocean?!?!?
    Also just on an editorial note, the dates for delivery should be 2018 not 2108….. unless they are waiting a while on parts…lol
    Looks like a nice aircraft…. say goodbye to four engines for good by the looks…

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Hi Dom,
      Apologies for the error. The story has been updated.

  • Craigy

    says:

    It is interesting that Airbus are now saying that they are looking at the A350 XWB as a whole to meet Qantas’ Project Sunrise. Given the limitations of the A350-900ULR outlined in the latest ULR spec (no forward cargo hold), it seems that Airbus are looking more at what they can do to tweek the A350-1000 to meet sunrise’s requirements and follow on ULR needs of other airlines such as ANZ and UAL for starters.

  • NJP

    says:

    What is the performance of the a350 engine v the GE90 on the 777/77x ?

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cathay Pacific takes delivery of its first Airbus A350-1000

written by australianaviation.com.au | June 20, 2018
Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000 B-LXA at Toulouse. (Cathay Pacific)
Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000 B-LXA at Toulouse. (Cathay Pacific)

Cathay Pacific has become the second airline in the world and first in Asia-Pacific to take delivery of the Airbus A350-1000.

The delivery flight of B-LXA took off from Airbus’s Toulouse headquarters with airline staff and media on board a little after 1440 on Tuesday (European time), landing at Hong Kong Airport about 12 hours later on Wednesday morning.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Some scenes from the delivery flight and arrival in Hong Kong on Twitter from CAPA – Centre for Aviation analyst Will Horton, and South China Morning Post reporter Danny Lee, who were on the delivery flight.

Cathay Pacific has 20 A350-1000s on order, with eight of the type to be delivered by the end of calendar 2018 and the remaining 12 to arrive by 2021.

The A350-1000 is 73.78m in length, 6.98m longer than the A350-900, and is designed to fly 7,950nm carrying 366 passengers, according to Airbus figures.

PROMOTED CONTENT

Cathay Pacific has configured its A350-1000 to carry 334 passengers comprising 46 business in a 1-2-1 layout with direct aisle access for every passenger, 32 in premium economy at eight abreast and 256 in economy with nine seats per row.

It has 54 more seats than Cathay Pacific’s 280-seat A350-900s (38 business, 28 premium economy and 214 economy).

Cathay Pacific chief customer and commercial officer Paul Loo said the entry-into-service of the A350-1000 built upon the airline’s successful induction of A350-900, which had allowed the airline to expand its long-haul network at a “near unprecedented rate”.

“The -1000 is very similar to the -900 in terms of its operational excellence,” Loo said in a statement.

“It has an incredible range, is remarkably fuel efficient and quiet, provides customers with an unsurpassed cabin environment and has extremely attractive operating economics.”

A look at the Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000

The A350-900, which Cathay Pacific began operating in May 2016, has led to new nonstop services from Hong Kong to Barcelona, Brussels, Christchurch, Copenhagen, Dublin, London Gatwick and Tel Aviv. The airline currently has 22 A350-900s in its fleet.

It has also been used to upgauge flights to Australia, with the A350-900 replacing 251-seat Airbus A330-300s (39 business, 21 premium economy, 191 economy) on some flights to Brisbane, Melbourne and Perth.

Cathay Pacific general manager for South West Pacific Rakesh Raicar said in February the A350-1000 could potentially be used on the Hong Kong-Sydney route, which is currently served three times daily with three-class 340-seat Boeing 777-300ERs, (40 business, 32 premium economy, 268 economy) and once daily with the A330-300.

“That one flight we are still operating with the A330, I don’t need to make any guesses what the planning could be for 2018,” Raicar told reporters in Sydney on February 1.

“It’s not confirmed, but I would say that’s an ideal candidate for an A350-1000, so Sydney might see an A350-1000 this year.

“It is in the planning stage. We are very gung-ho about it.”

Cathay Pacific has utilised all available traffic rights to Australia for Hong Kong-based carriers, meaning the only way to grow its presence is to utilise larger aircraft.

A350-1000 to launch Hong Kong-Washington DC

The A350-1000 will initially be used on short-haul flights to Taipei starting in July. The first long-haul route will be Hong Kong-Washington DC, which is set to begin in September 2018. At 7,085nm, it will be the longest route by distance in the airline’s network.

Other destinations due to receive A350-1000 service in the period ahead included Amsterdam, Madrid, Manchester, Tel Aviv and Zurich.

As with the delivery of all of Cathay Pacific’s 22 A350-900s, the delivery flight of B-LXA included the use of a biofuel blend to power the aircraft’s two Rolls-Royce Trent XWB-97 engines.

Qatar Airways was the launch customer for the A350-1000, with the airline taking delivery of the first of the type in February 2018.

At May 31 2018, Airbus had secured 847 orders A350, comprising 679 for the A350-900 and 168 for the A350-1000. Of those 174 aircraft have been delivered.


VIDEO: A look at the making of Cathay Pacific’s first Airbus A350-1000 from Airbus’s YouTube channel.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

7 Comments

  • Patrick Kilby

    says:

    Interesting that Qatar is not seen as part of the Asia Pacific. Qatar is in Asia, so where does Asia Pacific begin and end.

  • Craigy

    says:

    Qatar is in the middle east. It is not part of the Asia Pacific region

  • Lechuga

    says:

    @Patrick Kilby Is assume Asia pacific ends at the Indian Ocean. India and west from there would be classed as another area.

  • Dom

    says:

    Patrick…. Maybe once it turns into the Indian Ocean?!?!?
    Also just on an editorial note, the dates for delivery should be 2018 not 2108….. unless they are waiting a while on parts…lol
    Looks like a nice aircraft…. say goodbye to four engines for good by the looks…

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Hi Dom,
      Apologies for the error. The story has been updated.

  • Craigy

    says:

    It is interesting that Airbus are now saying that they are looking at the A350 XWB as a whole to meet Qantas’ Project Sunrise. Given the limitations of the A350-900ULR outlined in the latest ULR spec (no forward cargo hold), it seems that Airbus are looking more at what they can do to tweek the A350-1000 to meet sunrise’s requirements and follow on ULR needs of other airlines such as ANZ and UAL for starters.

  • NJP

    says:

    What is the performance of the a350 engine v the GE90 on the 777/77x ?

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cathay Pacific takes delivery of its first Airbus A350-1000

written by australianaviation.com.au | June 20, 2018
Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000 B-LXA at Toulouse. (Cathay Pacific)
Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000 B-LXA at Toulouse. (Cathay Pacific)

Cathay Pacific has become the second airline in the world and first in Asia-Pacific to take delivery of the Airbus A350-1000.

The delivery flight of B-LXA took off from Airbus’s Toulouse headquarters with airline staff and media on board a little after 1440 on Tuesday (European time), landing at Hong Kong Airport about 12 hours later on Wednesday morning.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Some scenes from the delivery flight and arrival in Hong Kong on Twitter from CAPA – Centre for Aviation analyst Will Horton, and South China Morning Post reporter Danny Lee, who were on the delivery flight.

Cathay Pacific has 20 A350-1000s on order, with eight of the type to be delivered by the end of calendar 2018 and the remaining 12 to arrive by 2021.

The A350-1000 is 73.78m in length, 6.98m longer than the A350-900, and is designed to fly 7,950nm carrying 366 passengers, according to Airbus figures.

PROMOTED CONTENT

Cathay Pacific has configured its A350-1000 to carry 334 passengers comprising 46 business in a 1-2-1 layout with direct aisle access for every passenger, 32 in premium economy at eight abreast and 256 in economy with nine seats per row.

It has 54 more seats than Cathay Pacific’s 280-seat A350-900s (38 business, 28 premium economy and 214 economy).

Cathay Pacific chief customer and commercial officer Paul Loo said the entry-into-service of the A350-1000 built upon the airline’s successful induction of A350-900, which had allowed the airline to expand its long-haul network at a “near unprecedented rate”.

“The -1000 is very similar to the -900 in terms of its operational excellence,” Loo said in a statement.

“It has an incredible range, is remarkably fuel efficient and quiet, provides customers with an unsurpassed cabin environment and has extremely attractive operating economics.”

A look at the Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000

The A350-900, which Cathay Pacific began operating in May 2016, has led to new nonstop services from Hong Kong to Barcelona, Brussels, Christchurch, Copenhagen, Dublin, London Gatwick and Tel Aviv. The airline currently has 22 A350-900s in its fleet.

It has also been used to upgauge flights to Australia, with the A350-900 replacing 251-seat Airbus A330-300s (39 business, 21 premium economy, 191 economy) on some flights to Brisbane, Melbourne and Perth.

Cathay Pacific general manager for South West Pacific Rakesh Raicar said in February the A350-1000 could potentially be used on the Hong Kong-Sydney route, which is currently served three times daily with three-class 340-seat Boeing 777-300ERs, (40 business, 32 premium economy, 268 economy) and once daily with the A330-300.

“That one flight we are still operating with the A330, I don’t need to make any guesses what the planning could be for 2018,” Raicar told reporters in Sydney on February 1.

“It’s not confirmed, but I would say that’s an ideal candidate for an A350-1000, so Sydney might see an A350-1000 this year.

“It is in the planning stage. We are very gung-ho about it.”

Cathay Pacific has utilised all available traffic rights to Australia for Hong Kong-based carriers, meaning the only way to grow its presence is to utilise larger aircraft.

A350-1000 to launch Hong Kong-Washington DC

The A350-1000 will initially be used on short-haul flights to Taipei starting in July. The first long-haul route will be Hong Kong-Washington DC, which is set to begin in September 2018. At 7,085nm, it will be the longest route by distance in the airline’s network.

Other destinations due to receive A350-1000 service in the period ahead included Amsterdam, Madrid, Manchester, Tel Aviv and Zurich.

As with the delivery of all of Cathay Pacific’s 22 A350-900s, the delivery flight of B-LXA included the use of a biofuel blend to power the aircraft’s two Rolls-Royce Trent XWB-97 engines.

Qatar Airways was the launch customer for the A350-1000, with the airline taking delivery of the first of the type in February 2018.

At May 31 2018, Airbus had secured 847 orders A350, comprising 679 for the A350-900 and 168 for the A350-1000. Of those 174 aircraft have been delivered.


VIDEO: A look at the making of Cathay Pacific’s first Airbus A350-1000 from Airbus’s YouTube channel.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

7 Comments

  • Patrick Kilby

    says:

    Interesting that Qatar is not seen as part of the Asia Pacific. Qatar is in Asia, so where does Asia Pacific begin and end.

  • Craigy

    says:

    Qatar is in the middle east. It is not part of the Asia Pacific region

  • Lechuga

    says:

    @Patrick Kilby Is assume Asia pacific ends at the Indian Ocean. India and west from there would be classed as another area.

  • Dom

    says:

    Patrick…. Maybe once it turns into the Indian Ocean?!?!?
    Also just on an editorial note, the dates for delivery should be 2018 not 2108….. unless they are waiting a while on parts…lol
    Looks like a nice aircraft…. say goodbye to four engines for good by the looks…

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Hi Dom,
      Apologies for the error. The story has been updated.

  • Craigy

    says:

    It is interesting that Airbus are now saying that they are looking at the A350 XWB as a whole to meet Qantas’ Project Sunrise. Given the limitations of the A350-900ULR outlined in the latest ULR spec (no forward cargo hold), it seems that Airbus are looking more at what they can do to tweek the A350-1000 to meet sunrise’s requirements and follow on ULR needs of other airlines such as ANZ and UAL for starters.

  • NJP

    says:

    What is the performance of the a350 engine v the GE90 on the 777/77x ?

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cathay Pacific takes delivery of its first Airbus A350-1000

written by australianaviation.com.au | June 20, 2018
Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000 B-LXA at Toulouse. (Cathay Pacific)
Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000 B-LXA at Toulouse. (Cathay Pacific)

Cathay Pacific has become the second airline in the world and first in Asia-Pacific to take delivery of the Airbus A350-1000.

The delivery flight of B-LXA took off from Airbus’s Toulouse headquarters with airline staff and media on board a little after 1440 on Tuesday (European time), landing at Hong Kong Airport about 12 hours later on Wednesday morning.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Some scenes from the delivery flight and arrival in Hong Kong on Twitter from CAPA – Centre for Aviation analyst Will Horton, and South China Morning Post reporter Danny Lee, who were on the delivery flight.

Cathay Pacific has 20 A350-1000s on order, with eight of the type to be delivered by the end of calendar 2018 and the remaining 12 to arrive by 2021.

The A350-1000 is 73.78m in length, 6.98m longer than the A350-900, and is designed to fly 7,950nm carrying 366 passengers, according to Airbus figures.

PROMOTED CONTENT

Cathay Pacific has configured its A350-1000 to carry 334 passengers comprising 46 business in a 1-2-1 layout with direct aisle access for every passenger, 32 in premium economy at eight abreast and 256 in economy with nine seats per row.

It has 54 more seats than Cathay Pacific’s 280-seat A350-900s (38 business, 28 premium economy and 214 economy).

Cathay Pacific chief customer and commercial officer Paul Loo said the entry-into-service of the A350-1000 built upon the airline’s successful induction of A350-900, which had allowed the airline to expand its long-haul network at a “near unprecedented rate”.

“The -1000 is very similar to the -900 in terms of its operational excellence,” Loo said in a statement.

“It has an incredible range, is remarkably fuel efficient and quiet, provides customers with an unsurpassed cabin environment and has extremely attractive operating economics.”

A look at the Cathay Pacific Airbus A350-1000

The A350-900, which Cathay Pacific began operating in May 2016, has led to new nonstop services from Hong Kong to Barcelona, Brussels, Christchurch, Copenhagen, Dublin, London Gatwick and Tel Aviv. The airline currently has 22 A350-900s in its fleet.

It has also been used to upgauge flights to Australia, with the A350-900 replacing 251-seat Airbus A330-300s (39 business, 21 premium economy, 191 economy) on some flights to Brisbane, Melbourne and Perth.

Cathay Pacific general manager for South West Pacific Rakesh Raicar said in February the A350-1000 could potentially be used on the Hong Kong-Sydney route, which is currently served three times daily with three-class 340-seat Boeing 777-300ERs, (40 business, 32 premium economy, 268 economy) and once daily with the A330-300.

“That one flight we are still operating with the A330, I don’t need to make any guesses what the planning could be for 2018,” Raicar told reporters in Sydney on February 1.

“It’s not confirmed, but I would say that’s an ideal candidate for an A350-1000, so Sydney might see an A350-1000 this year.

“It is in the planning stage. We are very gung-ho about it.”

Cathay Pacific has utilised all available traffic rights to Australia for Hong Kong-based carriers, meaning the only way to grow its presence is to utilise larger aircraft.

A350-1000 to launch Hong Kong-Washington DC

The A350-1000 will initially be used on short-haul flights to Taipei starting in July. The first long-haul route will be Hong Kong-Washington DC, which is set to begin in September 2018. At 7,085nm, it will be the longest route by distance in the airline’s network.

Other destinations due to receive A350-1000 service in the period ahead included Amsterdam, Madrid, Manchester, Tel Aviv and Zurich.

As with the delivery of all of Cathay Pacific’s 22 A350-900s, the delivery flight of B-LXA included the use of a biofuel blend to power the aircraft’s two Rolls-Royce Trent XWB-97 engines.

Qatar Airways was the launch customer for the A350-1000, with the airline taking delivery of the first of the type in February 2018.

At May 31 2018, Airbus had secured 847 orders A350, comprising 679 for the A350-900 and 168 for the A350-1000. Of those 174 aircraft have been delivered.


VIDEO: A look at the making of Cathay Pacific’s first Airbus A350-1000 from Airbus’s YouTube channel.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

7 Comments

  • Patrick Kilby

    says:

    Interesting that Qatar is not seen as part of the Asia Pacific. Qatar is in Asia, so where does Asia Pacific begin and end.

  • Craigy

    says:

    Qatar is in the middle east. It is not part of the Asia Pacific region

  • Lechuga

    says:

    @Patrick Kilby Is assume Asia pacific ends at the Indian Ocean. India and west from there would be classed as another area.

  • Dom

    says:

    Patrick…. Maybe once it turns into the Indian Ocean?!?!?
    Also just on an editorial note, the dates for delivery should be 2018 not 2108….. unless they are waiting a while on parts…lol
    Looks like a nice aircraft…. say goodbye to four engines for good by the looks…

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Hi Dom,
      Apologies for the error. The story has been updated.

  • Craigy

    says:

    It is interesting that Airbus are now saying that they are looking at the A350 XWB as a whole to meet Qantas’ Project Sunrise. Given the limitations of the A350-900ULR outlined in the latest ULR spec (no forward cargo hold), it seems that Airbus are looking more at what they can do to tweek the A350-1000 to meet sunrise’s requirements and follow on ULR needs of other airlines such as ANZ and UAL for starters.

  • NJP

    says:

    What is the performance of the a350 engine v the GE90 on the 777/77x ?

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Each day, our subscribers are more informed with the right information.

SIGN UP to the Australian Aviation magazine for high-quality news and features for just $99.95 per year