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Air Link baulks at interim Cobar & Mudgee services

written by australianaviation.com.au | January 31, 2014
photo - Paul Sadler
Air Link is still assessing the viability of Cobar and Mudgee services. (Paul Sadler)

Rex subsidiary Air Link has been granted interim approval to service Cobar and Mudgee from Sydney until March 21, but has decided not to operate those services because of what it says has been a “much-delayed approval” process.

Rex says it is still assessing whether the route is viable, and claimed Transport NSW’s drawn out granting of interim services for what would only be a seven week interim period meant it did not “make commercial sense” to commence the services.

The airline says it remains in discussions with the Cobar Shire Council and Mid-Western

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Regional Council, and says it will “decide on whether to apply for the NSW intrastate air transport licences for these two communities pending the outcome of these discussions.”

Both towns were left without RPT services after the November collapse of Brindabella Airlines.

5 Comments

  • John

    says:

    what a joke. Sounds like few hundred more useless public servants need the bullet.

    Charters could operate from the day Brindabella fell over.

    What’s the difference between a series of charters & RPT ?

    No one at CASA seems to be able to define the difference, except far more paperwork for latter.

  • Henk Luf

    says:

    Once again, services to and from regional NSW are in limbo because public servants can’t get their act together. Perhaps those public servants involved may care to look for other jobs elsewhere. A disgusting performance, as per usual.

  • Bob

    says:

    Sounds more like tactics around protected Sydney slots!… “Mudgee is definitely no longer viable now the momentum has been lost”. Slots return to the pool!

  • Russell M

    says:

    Agree with the above comments, totally.

    I’ll bet if you rang up Airlink for a charter quote to fly 15 pax from Sydney to Cobar TOMORROW (assuming they had a spare aircraft etc etc), they would be able to give you a figure and legally fly a charter straight up. No additional approvals or paperwork. Crew just checks out the good book to work out runway length and fuel.

    In an emergency situation (albeit quite a few years ago), we could have the RAAF and overseas unknown charter aircraft in the country flying people around within a week or so (memory is hazy on detail). Surely the overnight loss of services deserves an interim measure with either a proven charter company or an existing RPT to just take up the routes straight away, and without endless approvals and reviews by Canberra??

    For God’s sake, if the same aircraft was overflying Cobar on another approved service and popped an engine, I’m sure the crew would be very capable of making an approach and landing on the spot?

    A classic example of red tape and nonsense.

  • John

    says:

    Henk too many public servants get in the way protecting their jobs. Really good time for a huge clean out right now, we can’t afford them.

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Air Link baulks at interim Cobar & Mudgee services

written by australianaviation.com.au | January 31, 2014
photo - Paul Sadler
Air Link is still assessing the viability of Cobar and Mudgee services. (Paul Sadler)

Rex subsidiary Air Link has been granted interim approval to service Cobar and Mudgee from Sydney until March 21, but has decided not to operate those services because of what it says has been a “much-delayed approval” process.

Rex says it is still assessing whether the route is viable, and claimed Transport NSW’s drawn out granting of interim services for what would only be a seven week interim period meant it did not “make commercial sense” to commence the services.

The airline says it remains in discussions with the Cobar Shire Council and Mid-Western

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Regional Council, and says it will “decide on whether to apply for the NSW intrastate air transport licences for these two communities pending the outcome of these discussions.”

Both towns were left without RPT services after the November collapse of Brindabella Airlines.

5 Comments

  • John

    says:

    what a joke. Sounds like few hundred more useless public servants need the bullet.

    Charters could operate from the day Brindabella fell over.

    What’s the difference between a series of charters & RPT ?

    No one at CASA seems to be able to define the difference, except far more paperwork for latter.

  • Henk Luf

    says:

    Once again, services to and from regional NSW are in limbo because public servants can’t get their act together. Perhaps those public servants involved may care to look for other jobs elsewhere. A disgusting performance, as per usual.

  • Bob

    says:

    Sounds more like tactics around protected Sydney slots!… “Mudgee is definitely no longer viable now the momentum has been lost”. Slots return to the pool!

  • Russell M

    says:

    Agree with the above comments, totally.

    I’ll bet if you rang up Airlink for a charter quote to fly 15 pax from Sydney to Cobar TOMORROW (assuming they had a spare aircraft etc etc), they would be able to give you a figure and legally fly a charter straight up. No additional approvals or paperwork. Crew just checks out the good book to work out runway length and fuel.

    In an emergency situation (albeit quite a few years ago), we could have the RAAF and overseas unknown charter aircraft in the country flying people around within a week or so (memory is hazy on detail). Surely the overnight loss of services deserves an interim measure with either a proven charter company or an existing RPT to just take up the routes straight away, and without endless approvals and reviews by Canberra??

    For God’s sake, if the same aircraft was overflying Cobar on another approved service and popped an engine, I’m sure the crew would be very capable of making an approach and landing on the spot?

    A classic example of red tape and nonsense.

  • John

    says:

    Henk too many public servants get in the way protecting their jobs. Really good time for a huge clean out right now, we can’t afford them.

Leave a Comment to Henk Luf Cancel

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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