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Qantas schedules eight domestic Boeing 747 flights from Nov ’19 to Feb ’20

written by australianaviation.com.au | July 2, 2019
Qantas Boeing 747-400 VH-OJS landing at Sydney Airport. (Seth Jaworski)
Qantas Boeing 747-400 VH-OJS landing at Sydney Airport. (Seth Jaworski)

Qantas has scheduled the Boeing 747 on eight domestic services between November 2019 and February 2020 ahead of the type’s withdrawal from the fleet by the end of 2020.

The airline said in a statement on its website the flights would give travellers an opportunity to fly on the iconic aircraft without the need to leave the country.

The eight flights are as follows:

Advertisement
Advertisement
Date
Flight number
From
To

November 9 2019

QF524

Sydney

Brisbane

PROMOTED CONTENT

November 11 2019

QF529

Brisbane

Sydney

November 23 2019 

QF743 

Sydney

Adelaide 

November 25 2019

QF736

Adelaide

Sydney

December 31 2019

QF417

Sydney

Melbourne

January 1 2020

QF438

Melbourne

Sydney

February 15 2020

QF439

Sydney

Melbourne

February 17 2020

QF400

Melbourne

Sydney

SOURCE: Qantas

“The 747 has a special place in the hearts of many passengers and we’re delighted to announce that we’ll be operating a number of domestic services between November and February 2020, giving customers the opportunity to fly on the Jumbo without the need for a passport,” the Qantas statement on its website dated June 27 said.

The Qantas 747 fleet currently stands at seven aircraft, comprising six GE-powered 747-438ERs (VH-OEE thru OEJ) delivered between 2002 and 2003 and one Rolls-Royce-powered 747-438s (VH-OJU) delivered in the 1999-2000 timeframe.

The most recent retirement was VH-OEB MSN 25778 Phillip Island, which was withdrawn on June 2.

The 26-year-old aircraft operated its last commercial flight as QF73 from Sydney to San Francisco. It was then ferried to Los Angeles as QF6021 and onwards to Tupelo Regional Airport.

The GE-powered VH-OEB was the last 747 that had Qantas’s old first class seats in the nose, with the remaining 747-400s and -400ERs having been reconfigured with a three-class layout comprising business, premium economy and economy.

It was built for Asiana in 1993 and acquired by Qantas in 1998.

In all, Qantas has operated 65 747s, taking delivery of 57 new 747s from Boeing, purchasing three 747‑400s secondhand and operating five leased aircraft at various points. And for a period between the retirement of its last 707 in March 1978 and the delivery of its first 767 in July 1985 Qantas even operated an all-747 fleet.

The first 747 entered service with Qantas in September 1971, and in time the airline would operate almost every major 747 variant, including the 747SP, the 747 Combi, the 747-300 (which introduced the extended upper deck), the 747-400, and the 747‑400ER (Extended Range).

Qantas announced in May 2018 it had exercised options for a further six 787-9s and would retire the 747 fleet by the time the airline celebrated its centenary at the end of calendar 2020.


VIDEO: A Qantas television advertisement celebrating the introduction into service of the Boeing 747-400 in 1989 from the Yogiew2 YouTube channel.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

28 Comments

  • Kacey

    says:

    I’m on one of these flights, very excited!

  • Patrickk

    says:

    I think you will find these are linked to the Antarctic flights from each city.

    • reeves35

      says:

      Correct, they are all the positioning flights for Antarctic charters. Given the charterer will probably be paying for the repositioning, there is very little cost to Qantas in operating these flights.

      I would assume Qantas will operate actual farewell flights during 2020 in the lead-up to the retirement of the 747 fleet and at that time all capital city AU ports will be included.

  • Chris

    says:

    Yet again Perth misses out

    • The Sydney /Perth sector was operated by a 747
      For quite a while … but not to say goodbye

  • peter westgate

    says:

    Great idea , but wouldn’t a 5 hour Perth Sydney be pretty popular. Ideally long weekend late February in WA 2020

  • Brian

    says:

    Typical no flights to or from Perth

  • David

    says:

    What happened to Perth we the poor cousins to far as usual. Keep the east happy Alan

    • Glenn Turner

      says:

      Enjoying your direct flights to London?

  • Stu

    says:

    Well I guess this proves Perth, Hobart, and Darwin are not part of the Qantas network experience. Sad really

  • Tracey Manton

    says:

    Hi

    How much will the flights cost?

  • James Smith

    says:

    Three of these flights are scheduled services to position the aircraft for Antarctic flights from the respective cities and maybe the last flights to those cities before the retirement of the B744s in late 2020. Checking the Antarctic flights website there are B744 flights scheduled from Adelaide on 24/11/19 and Brisbane on 10/11/19 which coordinate with the domestic positioning services. One Melbourne service is the New Year’s Eve/Day Antarctic flight. QANTAS is selling positioning flights that have been previously operated empty. A fitting way for enthusiasts to have one last B744 flight and to say goodbye.

  • J Gavey

    says:

    One of the best aircraft built,but fuel savings over ride reliability and safety

    • James

      says:

      The Aircraft that are replacing them are just as reliable and safe if not even more then the 744s.

  • Greg

    says:

    Patrick is correct, the dates all line up with the Antarctic flights. It is a long time before the last 747 retires, so there is a bit of Qantas spin to sell the domestic sectors that are needed anyway.

  • Stephen Katthagen

    says:

    Qantas you really know how to pis- off 75 percent of the country , 4 flights just between Sydney and Melbourne, What about the rest of the state’s within Australia , Joyce.

  • Ryan O'Connell

    says:

    Nice if they made it to the west coast.. Apart from that, good to see some will get the chance for a lastb”fling”.

  • Paul wayne

    says:

    I understand let the annoyance of being left out.. imagine how country people feel flying old old dash aircraft and paying airfares that are expensive and a rip off…

  • Malki

    says:

    Most of the population lives in the 3 eastern (mainland) states… so how are they pissing-off three quarters of the population? By the way, regionals aren’t making a lot of money except through parent airlines like Qantas and Virgin… And besides, the regional pilots are usually struggling to get the flight hours they need to get into the majors for larger aircraft and larger pay-packets…

  • Jack Chomley

    says:

    When the 747s are retired, my overseas travel desires will have come to an end :-(. No way will I get on these new fandangled flying machines piloted by computers.

    • Chris

      says:

      Enjoy living in the 60s

    • Robbie

      says:

      Absolutely Jack ! I like to see 4 engines when I do the pond and a few greys on the tech crew. Thanks.

  • Mike

    says:

    I am somewhat dismayed with the negative comments in regard to this story. Qantas could have positioned the B747s to operate the respective charter flights as empty aircraft. Instead they decided to replace B737 (or perhaps A330) on selected domestic services with the B747 to have the aircraft ready for each subsequent charter flight. The airline is not “ignoring “ destinations, they are merely scheduling the aircraft to where they need to be, and at the same time making seats available. It is sad some readers have not understood this and feel slighted.
    Unfortunately I won’t be able to travel on any of the B747 domestic flights however am delighted that many aviation enthusiasts will get this opportunity. Rather than the “what about me” comments, we should be delighted many will enjoy a rare chance to fly in the Queen of the Skies before she leaves the Qantas fleet next year. Looking forward to seeing some trip reports and videos from the flights in due course.

    • James

      says:

      Mike. Spot on. It seems they think every decision QF make is some kind of personal slight against them, completely forgetting that behind every operational decision must have a positive commercial outcome. Well said.

  • John

    says:

    I am booked on the New Years eve Antarctic flight and thought one way to get to MEl would be to take the SYD to MEL 747 . Perfect way to make sure I cant miss the Antarctic flight

  • Jennifer Baguley

    says:

    If a passionate 747 client who lives in Broome WA wishes to travel on a 747 during the offered time. What flight do you suggest they take & do you have their Broome to Sydney & Melbourne to Broome flights discounted?
    Also what is the Sydney to Melbourne flight on the upper deck worth.

  • Angie

    says:

    Are any 747 flights leaving next year?

  • Jay

    says:

    Keyboard warrior’s will keep whining long after these magnificent aircraft engines have stopped. All the WA folk bitching about being left out when the red roo has been using 747 for SYD PER for months. I really feel for great organisations like QANTAS, no matter what they do there will be the same moaners.

    I love the 747 and will shed a tear when they retire but the in flight experience, air quality and comfort in all classes of the modern 787 (and A350) leave you feeling less knackered after a long flight. It’s technology, it moves forwards. Shed a tear, tip your hat and move on.
    Well done QANTAS, firstly for sharing this retirement plan with Australia, but more importantly for invrsting in the behind the scenes process and quality staff/experience that’s kept Australian travellers the safest in the world for 99 years.

    To all the moaners.. please fly air asia or tiger.

Leave a Comment to Chris Cancel

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Qantas schedules eight domestic Boeing 747 flights from Nov ’19 to Feb ’20

written by australianaviation.com.au | July 2, 2019
Qantas Boeing 747-400 VH-OJS landing at Sydney Airport. (Seth Jaworski)
Qantas Boeing 747-400 VH-OJS landing at Sydney Airport. (Seth Jaworski)

Qantas has scheduled the Boeing 747 on eight domestic services between November 2019 and February 2020 ahead of the type’s withdrawal from the fleet by the end of 2020.

The airline said in a statement on its website the flights would give travellers an opportunity to fly on the iconic aircraft without the need to leave the country.

The eight flights are as follows:

Advertisement
Advertisement
Date
Flight number
From
To

November 9 2019

QF524

Sydney

Brisbane

PROMOTED CONTENT

November 11 2019

QF529

Brisbane

Sydney

November 23 2019 

QF743 

Sydney

Adelaide 

November 25 2019

QF736

Adelaide

Sydney

December 31 2019

QF417

Sydney

Melbourne

January 1 2020

QF438

Melbourne

Sydney

February 15 2020

QF439

Sydney

Melbourne

February 17 2020

QF400

Melbourne

Sydney

SOURCE: Qantas

“The 747 has a special place in the hearts of many passengers and we’re delighted to announce that we’ll be operating a number of domestic services between November and February 2020, giving customers the opportunity to fly on the Jumbo without the need for a passport,” the Qantas statement on its website dated June 27 said.

The Qantas 747 fleet currently stands at seven aircraft, comprising six GE-powered 747-438ERs (VH-OEE thru OEJ) delivered between 2002 and 2003 and one Rolls-Royce-powered 747-438s (VH-OJU) delivered in the 1999-2000 timeframe.

The most recent retirement was VH-OEB MSN 25778 Phillip Island, which was withdrawn on June 2.

The 26-year-old aircraft operated its last commercial flight as QF73 from Sydney to San Francisco. It was then ferried to Los Angeles as QF6021 and onwards to Tupelo Regional Airport.

The GE-powered VH-OEB was the last 747 that had Qantas’s old first class seats in the nose, with the remaining 747-400s and -400ERs having been reconfigured with a three-class layout comprising business, premium economy and economy.

It was built for Asiana in 1993 and acquired by Qantas in 1998.

In all, Qantas has operated 65 747s, taking delivery of 57 new 747s from Boeing, purchasing three 747‑400s secondhand and operating five leased aircraft at various points. And for a period between the retirement of its last 707 in March 1978 and the delivery of its first 767 in July 1985 Qantas even operated an all-747 fleet.

The first 747 entered service with Qantas in September 1971, and in time the airline would operate almost every major 747 variant, including the 747SP, the 747 Combi, the 747-300 (which introduced the extended upper deck), the 747-400, and the 747‑400ER (Extended Range).

Qantas announced in May 2018 it had exercised options for a further six 787-9s and would retire the 747 fleet by the time the airline celebrated its centenary at the end of calendar 2020.


VIDEO: A Qantas television advertisement celebrating the introduction into service of the Boeing 747-400 in 1989 from the Yogiew2 YouTube channel.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

28 Comments

  • Kacey

    says:

    I’m on one of these flights, very excited!

  • Patrickk

    says:

    I think you will find these are linked to the Antarctic flights from each city.

    • reeves35

      says:

      Correct, they are all the positioning flights for Antarctic charters. Given the charterer will probably be paying for the repositioning, there is very little cost to Qantas in operating these flights.

      I would assume Qantas will operate actual farewell flights during 2020 in the lead-up to the retirement of the 747 fleet and at that time all capital city AU ports will be included.

  • Chris

    says:

    Yet again Perth misses out

    • The Sydney /Perth sector was operated by a 747
      For quite a while … but not to say goodbye

  • peter westgate

    says:

    Great idea , but wouldn’t a 5 hour Perth Sydney be pretty popular. Ideally long weekend late February in WA 2020

  • Brian

    says:

    Typical no flights to or from Perth

  • David

    says:

    What happened to Perth we the poor cousins to far as usual. Keep the east happy Alan

    • Glenn Turner

      says:

      Enjoying your direct flights to London?

  • Stu

    says:

    Well I guess this proves Perth, Hobart, and Darwin are not part of the Qantas network experience. Sad really

  • Tracey Manton

    says:

    Hi

    How much will the flights cost?

  • James Smith

    says:

    Three of these flights are scheduled services to position the aircraft for Antarctic flights from the respective cities and maybe the last flights to those cities before the retirement of the B744s in late 2020. Checking the Antarctic flights website there are B744 flights scheduled from Adelaide on 24/11/19 and Brisbane on 10/11/19 which coordinate with the domestic positioning services. One Melbourne service is the New Year’s Eve/Day Antarctic flight. QANTAS is selling positioning flights that have been previously operated empty. A fitting way for enthusiasts to have one last B744 flight and to say goodbye.

  • J Gavey

    says:

    One of the best aircraft built,but fuel savings over ride reliability and safety

    • James

      says:

      The Aircraft that are replacing them are just as reliable and safe if not even more then the 744s.

  • Greg

    says:

    Patrick is correct, the dates all line up with the Antarctic flights. It is a long time before the last 747 retires, so there is a bit of Qantas spin to sell the domestic sectors that are needed anyway.

  • Stephen Katthagen

    says:

    Qantas you really know how to pis- off 75 percent of the country , 4 flights just between Sydney and Melbourne, What about the rest of the state’s within Australia , Joyce.

  • Ryan O'Connell

    says:

    Nice if they made it to the west coast.. Apart from that, good to see some will get the chance for a lastb”fling”.

  • Paul wayne

    says:

    I understand let the annoyance of being left out.. imagine how country people feel flying old old dash aircraft and paying airfares that are expensive and a rip off…

  • Malki

    says:

    Most of the population lives in the 3 eastern (mainland) states… so how are they pissing-off three quarters of the population? By the way, regionals aren’t making a lot of money except through parent airlines like Qantas and Virgin… And besides, the regional pilots are usually struggling to get the flight hours they need to get into the majors for larger aircraft and larger pay-packets…

  • Jack Chomley

    says:

    When the 747s are retired, my overseas travel desires will have come to an end :-(. No way will I get on these new fandangled flying machines piloted by computers.

    • Chris

      says:

      Enjoy living in the 60s

    • Robbie

      says:

      Absolutely Jack ! I like to see 4 engines when I do the pond and a few greys on the tech crew. Thanks.

  • Mike

    says:

    I am somewhat dismayed with the negative comments in regard to this story. Qantas could have positioned the B747s to operate the respective charter flights as empty aircraft. Instead they decided to replace B737 (or perhaps A330) on selected domestic services with the B747 to have the aircraft ready for each subsequent charter flight. The airline is not “ignoring “ destinations, they are merely scheduling the aircraft to where they need to be, and at the same time making seats available. It is sad some readers have not understood this and feel slighted.
    Unfortunately I won’t be able to travel on any of the B747 domestic flights however am delighted that many aviation enthusiasts will get this opportunity. Rather than the “what about me” comments, we should be delighted many will enjoy a rare chance to fly in the Queen of the Skies before she leaves the Qantas fleet next year. Looking forward to seeing some trip reports and videos from the flights in due course.

    • James

      says:

      Mike. Spot on. It seems they think every decision QF make is some kind of personal slight against them, completely forgetting that behind every operational decision must have a positive commercial outcome. Well said.

  • John

    says:

    I am booked on the New Years eve Antarctic flight and thought one way to get to MEl would be to take the SYD to MEL 747 . Perfect way to make sure I cant miss the Antarctic flight

  • Jennifer Baguley

    says:

    If a passionate 747 client who lives in Broome WA wishes to travel on a 747 during the offered time. What flight do you suggest they take & do you have their Broome to Sydney & Melbourne to Broome flights discounted?
    Also what is the Sydney to Melbourne flight on the upper deck worth.

  • Angie

    says:

    Are any 747 flights leaving next year?

  • Jay

    says:

    Keyboard warrior’s will keep whining long after these magnificent aircraft engines have stopped. All the WA folk bitching about being left out when the red roo has been using 747 for SYD PER for months. I really feel for great organisations like QANTAS, no matter what they do there will be the same moaners.

    I love the 747 and will shed a tear when they retire but the in flight experience, air quality and comfort in all classes of the modern 787 (and A350) leave you feeling less knackered after a long flight. It’s technology, it moves forwards. Shed a tear, tip your hat and move on.
    Well done QANTAS, firstly for sharing this retirement plan with Australia, but more importantly for invrsting in the behind the scenes process and quality staff/experience that’s kept Australian travellers the safest in the world for 99 years.

    To all the moaners.. please fly air asia or tiger.

Leave a Comment to Chris Cancel

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Qantas schedules eight domestic Boeing 747 flights from Nov ’19 to Feb ’20

written by australianaviation.com.au | July 2, 2019
Qantas Boeing 747-400 VH-OJS landing at Sydney Airport. (Seth Jaworski)
Qantas Boeing 747-400 VH-OJS landing at Sydney Airport. (Seth Jaworski)

Qantas has scheduled the Boeing 747 on eight domestic services between November 2019 and February 2020 ahead of the type’s withdrawal from the fleet by the end of 2020.

The airline said in a statement on its website the flights would give travellers an opportunity to fly on the iconic aircraft without the need to leave the country.

The eight flights are as follows:

Advertisement
Advertisement
Date
Flight number
From
To

November 9 2019

QF524

Sydney

Brisbane

PROMOTED CONTENT

November 11 2019

QF529

Brisbane

Sydney

November 23 2019 

QF743 

Sydney

Adelaide 

November 25 2019

QF736

Adelaide

Sydney

December 31 2019

QF417

Sydney

Melbourne

January 1 2020

QF438

Melbourne

Sydney

February 15 2020

QF439

Sydney

Melbourne

February 17 2020

QF400

Melbourne

Sydney

SOURCE: Qantas

“The 747 has a special place in the hearts of many passengers and we’re delighted to announce that we’ll be operating a number of domestic services between November and February 2020, giving customers the opportunity to fly on the Jumbo without the need for a passport,” the Qantas statement on its website dated June 27 said.

The Qantas 747 fleet currently stands at seven aircraft, comprising six GE-powered 747-438ERs (VH-OEE thru OEJ) delivered between 2002 and 2003 and one Rolls-Royce-powered 747-438s (VH-OJU) delivered in the 1999-2000 timeframe.

The most recent retirement was VH-OEB MSN 25778 Phillip Island, which was withdrawn on June 2.

The 26-year-old aircraft operated its last commercial flight as QF73 from Sydney to San Francisco. It was then ferried to Los Angeles as QF6021 and onwards to Tupelo Regional Airport.

The GE-powered VH-OEB was the last 747 that had Qantas’s old first class seats in the nose, with the remaining 747-400s and -400ERs having been reconfigured with a three-class layout comprising business, premium economy and economy.

It was built for Asiana in 1993 and acquired by Qantas in 1998.

In all, Qantas has operated 65 747s, taking delivery of 57 new 747s from Boeing, purchasing three 747‑400s secondhand and operating five leased aircraft at various points. And for a period between the retirement of its last 707 in March 1978 and the delivery of its first 767 in July 1985 Qantas even operated an all-747 fleet.

The first 747 entered service with Qantas in September 1971, and in time the airline would operate almost every major 747 variant, including the 747SP, the 747 Combi, the 747-300 (which introduced the extended upper deck), the 747-400, and the 747‑400ER (Extended Range).

Qantas announced in May 2018 it had exercised options for a further six 787-9s and would retire the 747 fleet by the time the airline celebrated its centenary at the end of calendar 2020.


VIDEO: A Qantas television advertisement celebrating the introduction into service of the Boeing 747-400 in 1989 from the Yogiew2 YouTube channel.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

28 Comments

  • Kacey

    says:

    I’m on one of these flights, very excited!

  • Patrickk

    says:

    I think you will find these are linked to the Antarctic flights from each city.

    • reeves35

      says:

      Correct, they are all the positioning flights for Antarctic charters. Given the charterer will probably be paying for the repositioning, there is very little cost to Qantas in operating these flights.

      I would assume Qantas will operate actual farewell flights during 2020 in the lead-up to the retirement of the 747 fleet and at that time all capital city AU ports will be included.

  • Chris

    says:

    Yet again Perth misses out

    • The Sydney /Perth sector was operated by a 747
      For quite a while … but not to say goodbye

  • peter westgate

    says:

    Great idea , but wouldn’t a 5 hour Perth Sydney be pretty popular. Ideally long weekend late February in WA 2020

  • Brian

    says:

    Typical no flights to or from Perth

  • David

    says:

    What happened to Perth we the poor cousins to far as usual. Keep the east happy Alan

    • Glenn Turner

      says:

      Enjoying your direct flights to London?

  • Stu

    says:

    Well I guess this proves Perth, Hobart, and Darwin are not part of the Qantas network experience. Sad really

  • Tracey Manton

    says:

    Hi

    How much will the flights cost?

  • James Smith

    says:

    Three of these flights are scheduled services to position the aircraft for Antarctic flights from the respective cities and maybe the last flights to those cities before the retirement of the B744s in late 2020. Checking the Antarctic flights website there are B744 flights scheduled from Adelaide on 24/11/19 and Brisbane on 10/11/19 which coordinate with the domestic positioning services. One Melbourne service is the New Year’s Eve/Day Antarctic flight. QANTAS is selling positioning flights that have been previously operated empty. A fitting way for enthusiasts to have one last B744 flight and to say goodbye.

  • J Gavey

    says:

    One of the best aircraft built,but fuel savings over ride reliability and safety

    • James

      says:

      The Aircraft that are replacing them are just as reliable and safe if not even more then the 744s.

  • Greg

    says:

    Patrick is correct, the dates all line up with the Antarctic flights. It is a long time before the last 747 retires, so there is a bit of Qantas spin to sell the domestic sectors that are needed anyway.

  • Stephen Katthagen

    says:

    Qantas you really know how to pis- off 75 percent of the country , 4 flights just between Sydney and Melbourne, What about the rest of the state’s within Australia , Joyce.

  • Ryan O'Connell

    says:

    Nice if they made it to the west coast.. Apart from that, good to see some will get the chance for a lastb”fling”.

  • Paul wayne

    says:

    I understand let the annoyance of being left out.. imagine how country people feel flying old old dash aircraft and paying airfares that are expensive and a rip off…

  • Malki

    says:

    Most of the population lives in the 3 eastern (mainland) states… so how are they pissing-off three quarters of the population? By the way, regionals aren’t making a lot of money except through parent airlines like Qantas and Virgin… And besides, the regional pilots are usually struggling to get the flight hours they need to get into the majors for larger aircraft and larger pay-packets…

  • Jack Chomley

    says:

    When the 747s are retired, my overseas travel desires will have come to an end :-(. No way will I get on these new fandangled flying machines piloted by computers.

    • Chris

      says:

      Enjoy living in the 60s

    • Robbie

      says:

      Absolutely Jack ! I like to see 4 engines when I do the pond and a few greys on the tech crew. Thanks.

  • Mike

    says:

    I am somewhat dismayed with the negative comments in regard to this story. Qantas could have positioned the B747s to operate the respective charter flights as empty aircraft. Instead they decided to replace B737 (or perhaps A330) on selected domestic services with the B747 to have the aircraft ready for each subsequent charter flight. The airline is not “ignoring “ destinations, they are merely scheduling the aircraft to where they need to be, and at the same time making seats available. It is sad some readers have not understood this and feel slighted.
    Unfortunately I won’t be able to travel on any of the B747 domestic flights however am delighted that many aviation enthusiasts will get this opportunity. Rather than the “what about me” comments, we should be delighted many will enjoy a rare chance to fly in the Queen of the Skies before she leaves the Qantas fleet next year. Looking forward to seeing some trip reports and videos from the flights in due course.

    • James

      says:

      Mike. Spot on. It seems they think every decision QF make is some kind of personal slight against them, completely forgetting that behind every operational decision must have a positive commercial outcome. Well said.

  • John

    says:

    I am booked on the New Years eve Antarctic flight and thought one way to get to MEl would be to take the SYD to MEL 747 . Perfect way to make sure I cant miss the Antarctic flight

  • Jennifer Baguley

    says:

    If a passionate 747 client who lives in Broome WA wishes to travel on a 747 during the offered time. What flight do you suggest they take & do you have their Broome to Sydney & Melbourne to Broome flights discounted?
    Also what is the Sydney to Melbourne flight on the upper deck worth.

  • Angie

    says:

    Are any 747 flights leaving next year?

  • Jay

    says:

    Keyboard warrior’s will keep whining long after these magnificent aircraft engines have stopped. All the WA folk bitching about being left out when the red roo has been using 747 for SYD PER for months. I really feel for great organisations like QANTAS, no matter what they do there will be the same moaners.

    I love the 747 and will shed a tear when they retire but the in flight experience, air quality and comfort in all classes of the modern 787 (and A350) leave you feeling less knackered after a long flight. It’s technology, it moves forwards. Shed a tear, tip your hat and move on.
    Well done QANTAS, firstly for sharing this retirement plan with Australia, but more importantly for invrsting in the behind the scenes process and quality staff/experience that’s kept Australian travellers the safest in the world for 99 years.

    To all the moaners.. please fly air asia or tiger.

Leave a Comment to Chris Cancel

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Qantas schedules eight domestic Boeing 747 flights from Nov ’19 to Feb ’20

written by australianaviation.com.au | July 2, 2019
Qantas Boeing 747-400 VH-OJS landing at Sydney Airport. (Seth Jaworski)
Qantas Boeing 747-400 VH-OJS landing at Sydney Airport. (Seth Jaworski)

Qantas has scheduled the Boeing 747 on eight domestic services between November 2019 and February 2020 ahead of the type’s withdrawal from the fleet by the end of 2020.

The airline said in a statement on its website the flights would give travellers an opportunity to fly on the iconic aircraft without the need to leave the country.

The eight flights are as follows:

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Date
Flight number
From
To

November 9 2019

QF524

Sydney

Brisbane

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November 11 2019

QF529

Brisbane

Sydney

November 23 2019 

QF743 

Sydney

Adelaide 

November 25 2019

QF736

Adelaide

Sydney

December 31 2019

QF417

Sydney

Melbourne

January 1 2020

QF438

Melbourne

Sydney

February 15 2020

QF439

Sydney

Melbourne

February 17 2020

QF400

Melbourne

Sydney

SOURCE: Qantas

“The 747 has a special place in the hearts of many passengers and we’re delighted to announce that we’ll be operating a number of domestic services between November and February 2020, giving customers the opportunity to fly on the Jumbo without the need for a passport,” the Qantas statement on its website dated June 27 said.

The Qantas 747 fleet currently stands at seven aircraft, comprising six GE-powered 747-438ERs (VH-OEE thru OEJ) delivered between 2002 and 2003 and one Rolls-Royce-powered 747-438s (VH-OJU) delivered in the 1999-2000 timeframe.

The most recent retirement was VH-OEB MSN 25778 Phillip Island, which was withdrawn on June 2.

The 26-year-old aircraft operated its last commercial flight as QF73 from Sydney to San Francisco. It was then ferried to Los Angeles as QF6021 and onwards to Tupelo Regional Airport.

The GE-powered VH-OEB was the last 747 that had Qantas’s old first class seats in the nose, with the remaining 747-400s and -400ERs having been reconfigured with a three-class layout comprising business, premium economy and economy.

It was built for Asiana in 1993 and acquired by Qantas in 1998.

In all, Qantas has operated 65 747s, taking delivery of 57 new 747s from Boeing, purchasing three 747‑400s secondhand and operating five leased aircraft at various points. And for a period between the retirement of its last 707 in March 1978 and the delivery of its first 767 in July 1985 Qantas even operated an all-747 fleet.

The first 747 entered service with Qantas in September 1971, and in time the airline would operate almost every major 747 variant, including the 747SP, the 747 Combi, the 747-300 (which introduced the extended upper deck), the 747-400, and the 747‑400ER (Extended Range).

Qantas announced in May 2018 it had exercised options for a further six 787-9s and would retire the 747 fleet by the time the airline celebrated its centenary at the end of calendar 2020.


VIDEO: A Qantas television advertisement celebrating the introduction into service of the Boeing 747-400 in 1989 from the Yogiew2 YouTube channel.

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28 Comments

  • Kacey

    says:

    I’m on one of these flights, very excited!

  • Patrickk

    says:

    I think you will find these are linked to the Antarctic flights from each city.

    • reeves35

      says:

      Correct, they are all the positioning flights for Antarctic charters. Given the charterer will probably be paying for the repositioning, there is very little cost to Qantas in operating these flights.

      I would assume Qantas will operate actual farewell flights during 2020 in the lead-up to the retirement of the 747 fleet and at that time all capital city AU ports will be included.

  • Chris

    says:

    Yet again Perth misses out

    • The Sydney /Perth sector was operated by a 747
      For quite a while … but not to say goodbye

  • peter westgate

    says:

    Great idea , but wouldn’t a 5 hour Perth Sydney be pretty popular. Ideally long weekend late February in WA 2020

  • Brian

    says:

    Typical no flights to or from Perth

  • David

    says:

    What happened to Perth we the poor cousins to far as usual. Keep the east happy Alan

    • Glenn Turner

      says:

      Enjoying your direct flights to London?

  • Stu

    says:

    Well I guess this proves Perth, Hobart, and Darwin are not part of the Qantas network experience. Sad really

  • Tracey Manton

    says:

    Hi

    How much will the flights cost?

  • James Smith

    says:

    Three of these flights are scheduled services to position the aircraft for Antarctic flights from the respective cities and maybe the last flights to those cities before the retirement of the B744s in late 2020. Checking the Antarctic flights website there are B744 flights scheduled from Adelaide on 24/11/19 and Brisbane on 10/11/19 which coordinate with the domestic positioning services. One Melbourne service is the New Year’s Eve/Day Antarctic flight. QANTAS is selling positioning flights that have been previously operated empty. A fitting way for enthusiasts to have one last B744 flight and to say goodbye.

  • J Gavey

    says:

    One of the best aircraft built,but fuel savings over ride reliability and safety

    • James

      says:

      The Aircraft that are replacing them are just as reliable and safe if not even more then the 744s.

  • Greg

    says:

    Patrick is correct, the dates all line up with the Antarctic flights. It is a long time before the last 747 retires, so there is a bit of Qantas spin to sell the domestic sectors that are needed anyway.

  • Stephen Katthagen

    says:

    Qantas you really know how to pis- off 75 percent of the country , 4 flights just between Sydney and Melbourne, What about the rest of the state’s within Australia , Joyce.

  • Ryan O'Connell

    says:

    Nice if they made it to the west coast.. Apart from that, good to see some will get the chance for a lastb”fling”.

  • Paul wayne

    says:

    I understand let the annoyance of being left out.. imagine how country people feel flying old old dash aircraft and paying airfares that are expensive and a rip off…

  • Malki

    says:

    Most of the population lives in the 3 eastern (mainland) states… so how are they pissing-off three quarters of the population? By the way, regionals aren’t making a lot of money except through parent airlines like Qantas and Virgin… And besides, the regional pilots are usually struggling to get the flight hours they need to get into the majors for larger aircraft and larger pay-packets…

  • Jack Chomley

    says:

    When the 747s are retired, my overseas travel desires will have come to an end :-(. No way will I get on these new fandangled flying machines piloted by computers.

    • Chris

      says:

      Enjoy living in the 60s

    • Robbie

      says:

      Absolutely Jack ! I like to see 4 engines when I do the pond and a few greys on the tech crew. Thanks.

  • Mike

    says:

    I am somewhat dismayed with the negative comments in regard to this story. Qantas could have positioned the B747s to operate the respective charter flights as empty aircraft. Instead they decided to replace B737 (or perhaps A330) on selected domestic services with the B747 to have the aircraft ready for each subsequent charter flight. The airline is not “ignoring “ destinations, they are merely scheduling the aircraft to where they need to be, and at the same time making seats available. It is sad some readers have not understood this and feel slighted.
    Unfortunately I won’t be able to travel on any of the B747 domestic flights however am delighted that many aviation enthusiasts will get this opportunity. Rather than the “what about me” comments, we should be delighted many will enjoy a rare chance to fly in the Queen of the Skies before she leaves the Qantas fleet next year. Looking forward to seeing some trip reports and videos from the flights in due course.

    • James

      says:

      Mike. Spot on. It seems they think every decision QF make is some kind of personal slight against them, completely forgetting that behind every operational decision must have a positive commercial outcome. Well said.

  • John

    says:

    I am booked on the New Years eve Antarctic flight and thought one way to get to MEl would be to take the SYD to MEL 747 . Perfect way to make sure I cant miss the Antarctic flight

  • Jennifer Baguley

    says:

    If a passionate 747 client who lives in Broome WA wishes to travel on a 747 during the offered time. What flight do you suggest they take & do you have their Broome to Sydney & Melbourne to Broome flights discounted?
    Also what is the Sydney to Melbourne flight on the upper deck worth.

  • Angie

    says:

    Are any 747 flights leaving next year?

  • Jay

    says:

    Keyboard warrior’s will keep whining long after these magnificent aircraft engines have stopped. All the WA folk bitching about being left out when the red roo has been using 747 for SYD PER for months. I really feel for great organisations like QANTAS, no matter what they do there will be the same moaners.

    I love the 747 and will shed a tear when they retire but the in flight experience, air quality and comfort in all classes of the modern 787 (and A350) leave you feeling less knackered after a long flight. It’s technology, it moves forwards. Shed a tear, tip your hat and move on.
    Well done QANTAS, firstly for sharing this retirement plan with Australia, but more importantly for invrsting in the behind the scenes process and quality staff/experience that’s kept Australian travellers the safest in the world for 99 years.

    To all the moaners.. please fly air asia or tiger.

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