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Canada receives first two RAAF classic Hornets

written by australianaviation.com.au | February 18, 2019
The first of two RAAF F/A-18As arrives at Canada’s Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment – Canadian Flight Test Centre (AETE – CFTC) at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alberta, on February 16. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
The first of two RAAF F/A-18As arrives at Canada’s Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment – Canadian Flight Test Centre (AETE – CFTC) at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alberta, on February 16. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) has commenced the drawdown of its classic Hornet fleet with the delivery of the first two F/A-18A/Bs to the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF).

The two F/A-18A single-seat classic Hornets, RAAF tail numbers A21-53 and A21-55, arrived at Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake in Alberta on February 16, following their deployment to Exercise Red Flag 19-1 in Nevada.

The sale to Canada, which was confirmed in December, covered a total of 25 aircraft – 18 RAAF Hornets as interim fighters to complement their fleet of similarly configured CF-18s, and a further seven jets to be used as spares and test articles.

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“The interim fighter fleet is key to ensuring the Royal Canadian Air Force can continue to fulfil their missions and ensure the safety of Canadians and Canada,” Harjit Sajjan, the Canadian defence minister, said in a statement on February 17.

“We are familiar with these aircraft and are confident that they can provide the additional support our current fleet requires.

“They were flown in yesterday by the Royal Australian Air Force and I look forward to seeing them fly again soon in our Canadian colours.”

The Canadian government said the RAAF aircraft were the same type as its current CF-18 fleet and would be integrated quickly into the fleet following some modifications and technical work.

PROMOTED CONTENT

All aircraft were expected to be delivered by the end of 2021.

The aircraft will be employed at 3 Wing Bagotville and 4 Wing Cold Lake.

Canada said it expected to release its formal request for proposals for the future fighter fleet later in 2019, with the contract due to be awarded in 2021-22 and deliveries to begin in 2025.

The RAAF is gradually withdrawing its classic Hornets as it take delivery of new F-35As.

The first two F-35As are now in country, with another eight scheduled to be delivered through the course of 2019. Initial operational capability was planned for the end of 2020.

“Australia and Canada have a longstanding defence relationship and this sale is an excellent example of our mutual commitment towards supporting our respective defence capabilities,” Defence Minister Christopher Pyne said in a statement.

“These jets have served Australia very well and will now continue to make a positive contribution to the air combat capability of one of our closest allies.”

The two Hornets were handed over by the RAAF’s Commander Air Combat Group, AIRCDRE Mike Kitcher, and Commanding Officer 77SQN, WGCDR Jason Easthope. The aircraft were part of the last batch manufactured for the RAAF at Avalon near Melbourne in 1989 and delivered in early 1990.

Air Commodore Michael Kitcher (right), Commander Air Combat Group and Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Pilon (left), acting Wing Commander of 4 Wing Cold Lake. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
Air Commodore Michael Kitcher (right), Commander Air Combat Group and Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Pilon (left), acting Wing Commander of 4 Wing Cold Lake. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
Members of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), the Royal Canadian Air Force and representatives of the Interim Fighter Capability Project stand in front of the newly arrived RAAF F/A-18. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
Members of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), the Royal Canadian Air Force and representatives of the Interim Fighter Capability Project stand in front of the newly arrived RAAF F/A-18. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)

The RAAF took delivery of 57 single-seat F/A-18As and 18 two-seat F/A-18Bs between 1985 and 1990. All but the first two F/A-18Bs were assembled at Avalon, initially from knock-down kits, but with gradually increasing amount of locally manufactured components as production progressed.


VIDEO: The official handover ceremony of the first two RAAF F/A-18A/B classic Hornets to the Royal Canadian Air Force from the Australian Aviation YouTube channel.

 

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

7 Comments

  • Jason Clark

    says:

    Jason Easthope…….NZ lost one of the best fighter pilots in the world but what a gain for Australia!

  • Gary

    says:

    CO77 is WGCDR Jason Easthope not Easthorpe.

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Apologies for the error. The story has been updated.

  • Jasper Russell

    says:

    The Canadian government and it’s defense department are one set of complete dummies.

    • Ben

      says:

      Maybe, but they aren’t from Boeing (they are MD or CAC built) and politically that’s what’s important!

    • Raymond

      says:

      It’s called kicking the can down the road for political reasons instead of swallowing their pride and admitting that the F-35 is actually the most sensible and the best choice, as well as now being great value.

  • Mick C

    says:

    The problem for Treadau is the F35s cancellation due to its cost was a major Election promise and he has been backed into a corner. Throw in the fight with Boeing and its become a very big Corner.

Leave a Comment to Raymond Cancel

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Canada receives first two RAAF classic Hornets

written by australianaviation.com.au | February 18, 2019
The first of two RAAF F/A-18As arrives at Canada’s Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment – Canadian Flight Test Centre (AETE – CFTC) at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alberta, on February 16. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
The first of two RAAF F/A-18As arrives at Canada’s Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment – Canadian Flight Test Centre (AETE – CFTC) at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alberta, on February 16. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) has commenced the drawdown of its classic Hornet fleet with the delivery of the first two F/A-18A/Bs to the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF).

The two F/A-18A single-seat classic Hornets, RAAF tail numbers A21-53 and A21-55, arrived at Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake in Alberta on February 16, following their deployment to Exercise Red Flag 19-1 in Nevada.

The sale to Canada, which was confirmed in December, covered a total of 25 aircraft – 18 RAAF Hornets as interim fighters to complement their fleet of similarly configured CF-18s, and a further seven jets to be used as spares and test articles.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“The interim fighter fleet is key to ensuring the Royal Canadian Air Force can continue to fulfil their missions and ensure the safety of Canadians and Canada,” Harjit Sajjan, the Canadian defence minister, said in a statement on February 17.

“We are familiar with these aircraft and are confident that they can provide the additional support our current fleet requires.

“They were flown in yesterday by the Royal Australian Air Force and I look forward to seeing them fly again soon in our Canadian colours.”

The Canadian government said the RAAF aircraft were the same type as its current CF-18 fleet and would be integrated quickly into the fleet following some modifications and technical work.

PROMOTED CONTENT

All aircraft were expected to be delivered by the end of 2021.

The aircraft will be employed at 3 Wing Bagotville and 4 Wing Cold Lake.

Canada said it expected to release its formal request for proposals for the future fighter fleet later in 2019, with the contract due to be awarded in 2021-22 and deliveries to begin in 2025.

The RAAF is gradually withdrawing its classic Hornets as it take delivery of new F-35As.

The first two F-35As are now in country, with another eight scheduled to be delivered through the course of 2019. Initial operational capability was planned for the end of 2020.

“Australia and Canada have a longstanding defence relationship and this sale is an excellent example of our mutual commitment towards supporting our respective defence capabilities,” Defence Minister Christopher Pyne said in a statement.

“These jets have served Australia very well and will now continue to make a positive contribution to the air combat capability of one of our closest allies.”

The two Hornets were handed over by the RAAF’s Commander Air Combat Group, AIRCDRE Mike Kitcher, and Commanding Officer 77SQN, WGCDR Jason Easthope. The aircraft were part of the last batch manufactured for the RAAF at Avalon near Melbourne in 1989 and delivered in early 1990.

Air Commodore Michael Kitcher (right), Commander Air Combat Group and Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Pilon (left), acting Wing Commander of 4 Wing Cold Lake. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
Air Commodore Michael Kitcher (right), Commander Air Combat Group and Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Pilon (left), acting Wing Commander of 4 Wing Cold Lake. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
Members of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), the Royal Canadian Air Force and representatives of the Interim Fighter Capability Project stand in front of the newly arrived RAAF F/A-18. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
Members of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), the Royal Canadian Air Force and representatives of the Interim Fighter Capability Project stand in front of the newly arrived RAAF F/A-18. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)

The RAAF took delivery of 57 single-seat F/A-18As and 18 two-seat F/A-18Bs between 1985 and 1990. All but the first two F/A-18Bs were assembled at Avalon, initially from knock-down kits, but with gradually increasing amount of locally manufactured components as production progressed.


VIDEO: The official handover ceremony of the first two RAAF F/A-18A/B classic Hornets to the Royal Canadian Air Force from the Australian Aviation YouTube channel.

 

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

7 Comments

  • Jason Clark

    says:

    Jason Easthope…….NZ lost one of the best fighter pilots in the world but what a gain for Australia!

  • Gary

    says:

    CO77 is WGCDR Jason Easthope not Easthorpe.

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Apologies for the error. The story has been updated.

  • Jasper Russell

    says:

    The Canadian government and it’s defense department are one set of complete dummies.

    • Ben

      says:

      Maybe, but they aren’t from Boeing (they are MD or CAC built) and politically that’s what’s important!

    • Raymond

      says:

      It’s called kicking the can down the road for political reasons instead of swallowing their pride and admitting that the F-35 is actually the most sensible and the best choice, as well as now being great value.

  • Mick C

    says:

    The problem for Treadau is the F35s cancellation due to its cost was a major Election promise and he has been backed into a corner. Throw in the fight with Boeing and its become a very big Corner.

Leave a Comment to Raymond Cancel

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Canada receives first two RAAF classic Hornets

written by australianaviation.com.au | February 18, 2019
The first of two RAAF F/A-18As arrives at Canada’s Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment – Canadian Flight Test Centre (AETE – CFTC) at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alberta, on February 16. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
The first of two RAAF F/A-18As arrives at Canada’s Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment – Canadian Flight Test Centre (AETE – CFTC) at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alberta, on February 16. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) has commenced the drawdown of its classic Hornet fleet with the delivery of the first two F/A-18A/Bs to the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF).

The two F/A-18A single-seat classic Hornets, RAAF tail numbers A21-53 and A21-55, arrived at Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake in Alberta on February 16, following their deployment to Exercise Red Flag 19-1 in Nevada.

The sale to Canada, which was confirmed in December, covered a total of 25 aircraft – 18 RAAF Hornets as interim fighters to complement their fleet of similarly configured CF-18s, and a further seven jets to be used as spares and test articles.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“The interim fighter fleet is key to ensuring the Royal Canadian Air Force can continue to fulfil their missions and ensure the safety of Canadians and Canada,” Harjit Sajjan, the Canadian defence minister, said in a statement on February 17.

“We are familiar with these aircraft and are confident that they can provide the additional support our current fleet requires.

“They were flown in yesterday by the Royal Australian Air Force and I look forward to seeing them fly again soon in our Canadian colours.”

The Canadian government said the RAAF aircraft were the same type as its current CF-18 fleet and would be integrated quickly into the fleet following some modifications and technical work.

PROMOTED CONTENT

All aircraft were expected to be delivered by the end of 2021.

The aircraft will be employed at 3 Wing Bagotville and 4 Wing Cold Lake.

Canada said it expected to release its formal request for proposals for the future fighter fleet later in 2019, with the contract due to be awarded in 2021-22 and deliveries to begin in 2025.

The RAAF is gradually withdrawing its classic Hornets as it take delivery of new F-35As.

The first two F-35As are now in country, with another eight scheduled to be delivered through the course of 2019. Initial operational capability was planned for the end of 2020.

“Australia and Canada have a longstanding defence relationship and this sale is an excellent example of our mutual commitment towards supporting our respective defence capabilities,” Defence Minister Christopher Pyne said in a statement.

“These jets have served Australia very well and will now continue to make a positive contribution to the air combat capability of one of our closest allies.”

The two Hornets were handed over by the RAAF’s Commander Air Combat Group, AIRCDRE Mike Kitcher, and Commanding Officer 77SQN, WGCDR Jason Easthope. The aircraft were part of the last batch manufactured for the RAAF at Avalon near Melbourne in 1989 and delivered in early 1990.

Air Commodore Michael Kitcher (right), Commander Air Combat Group and Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Pilon (left), acting Wing Commander of 4 Wing Cold Lake. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
Air Commodore Michael Kitcher (right), Commander Air Combat Group and Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Pilon (left), acting Wing Commander of 4 Wing Cold Lake. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
Members of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), the Royal Canadian Air Force and representatives of the Interim Fighter Capability Project stand in front of the newly arrived RAAF F/A-18. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
Members of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), the Royal Canadian Air Force and representatives of the Interim Fighter Capability Project stand in front of the newly arrived RAAF F/A-18. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)

The RAAF took delivery of 57 single-seat F/A-18As and 18 two-seat F/A-18Bs between 1985 and 1990. All but the first two F/A-18Bs were assembled at Avalon, initially from knock-down kits, but with gradually increasing amount of locally manufactured components as production progressed.


VIDEO: The official handover ceremony of the first two RAAF F/A-18A/B classic Hornets to the Royal Canadian Air Force from the Australian Aviation YouTube channel.

 

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

7 Comments

  • Jason Clark

    says:

    Jason Easthope…….NZ lost one of the best fighter pilots in the world but what a gain for Australia!

  • Gary

    says:

    CO77 is WGCDR Jason Easthope not Easthorpe.

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Apologies for the error. The story has been updated.

  • Jasper Russell

    says:

    The Canadian government and it’s defense department are one set of complete dummies.

    • Ben

      says:

      Maybe, but they aren’t from Boeing (they are MD or CAC built) and politically that’s what’s important!

    • Raymond

      says:

      It’s called kicking the can down the road for political reasons instead of swallowing their pride and admitting that the F-35 is actually the most sensible and the best choice, as well as now being great value.

  • Mick C

    says:

    The problem for Treadau is the F35s cancellation due to its cost was a major Election promise and he has been backed into a corner. Throw in the fight with Boeing and its become a very big Corner.

Leave a Comment to Raymond Cancel

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Canada receives first two RAAF classic Hornets

written by australianaviation.com.au | February 18, 2019
The first of two RAAF F/A-18As arrives at Canada’s Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment – Canadian Flight Test Centre (AETE – CFTC) at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alberta, on February 16. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
The first of two RAAF F/A-18As arrives at Canada’s Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment – Canadian Flight Test Centre (AETE – CFTC) at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alberta, on February 16. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) has commenced the drawdown of its classic Hornet fleet with the delivery of the first two F/A-18A/Bs to the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF).

The two F/A-18A single-seat classic Hornets, RAAF tail numbers A21-53 and A21-55, arrived at Canadian Forces Base Cold Lake in Alberta on February 16, following their deployment to Exercise Red Flag 19-1 in Nevada.

The sale to Canada, which was confirmed in December, covered a total of 25 aircraft – 18 RAAF Hornets as interim fighters to complement their fleet of similarly configured CF-18s, and a further seven jets to be used as spares and test articles.

Advertisement
Advertisement

“The interim fighter fleet is key to ensuring the Royal Canadian Air Force can continue to fulfil their missions and ensure the safety of Canadians and Canada,” Harjit Sajjan, the Canadian defence minister, said in a statement on February 17.

“We are familiar with these aircraft and are confident that they can provide the additional support our current fleet requires.

“They were flown in yesterday by the Royal Australian Air Force and I look forward to seeing them fly again soon in our Canadian colours.”

The Canadian government said the RAAF aircraft were the same type as its current CF-18 fleet and would be integrated quickly into the fleet following some modifications and technical work.

PROMOTED CONTENT

All aircraft were expected to be delivered by the end of 2021.

The aircraft will be employed at 3 Wing Bagotville and 4 Wing Cold Lake.

Canada said it expected to release its formal request for proposals for the future fighter fleet later in 2019, with the contract due to be awarded in 2021-22 and deliveries to begin in 2025.

The RAAF is gradually withdrawing its classic Hornets as it take delivery of new F-35As.

The first two F-35As are now in country, with another eight scheduled to be delivered through the course of 2019. Initial operational capability was planned for the end of 2020.

“Australia and Canada have a longstanding defence relationship and this sale is an excellent example of our mutual commitment towards supporting our respective defence capabilities,” Defence Minister Christopher Pyne said in a statement.

“These jets have served Australia very well and will now continue to make a positive contribution to the air combat capability of one of our closest allies.”

The two Hornets were handed over by the RAAF’s Commander Air Combat Group, AIRCDRE Mike Kitcher, and Commanding Officer 77SQN, WGCDR Jason Easthope. The aircraft were part of the last batch manufactured for the RAAF at Avalon near Melbourne in 1989 and delivered in early 1990.

Air Commodore Michael Kitcher (right), Commander Air Combat Group and Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Pilon (left), acting Wing Commander of 4 Wing Cold Lake. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
Air Commodore Michael Kitcher (right), Commander Air Combat Group and Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan Pilon (left), acting Wing Commander of 4 Wing Cold Lake. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
Members of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), the Royal Canadian Air Force and representatives of the Interim Fighter Capability Project stand in front of the newly arrived RAAF F/A-18. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)
Members of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), the Royal Canadian Air Force and representatives of the Interim Fighter Capability Project stand in front of the newly arrived RAAF F/A-18. (Cold Lake Imagery/Canada)

The RAAF took delivery of 57 single-seat F/A-18As and 18 two-seat F/A-18Bs between 1985 and 1990. All but the first two F/A-18Bs were assembled at Avalon, initially from knock-down kits, but with gradually increasing amount of locally manufactured components as production progressed.


VIDEO: The official handover ceremony of the first two RAAF F/A-18A/B classic Hornets to the Royal Canadian Air Force from the Australian Aviation YouTube channel.

 

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

7 Comments

  • Jason Clark

    says:

    Jason Easthope…….NZ lost one of the best fighter pilots in the world but what a gain for Australia!

  • Gary

    says:

    CO77 is WGCDR Jason Easthope not Easthorpe.

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Apologies for the error. The story has been updated.

  • Jasper Russell

    says:

    The Canadian government and it’s defense department are one set of complete dummies.

    • Ben

      says:

      Maybe, but they aren’t from Boeing (they are MD or CAC built) and politically that’s what’s important!

    • Raymond

      says:

      It’s called kicking the can down the road for political reasons instead of swallowing their pride and admitting that the F-35 is actually the most sensible and the best choice, as well as now being great value.

  • Mick C

    says:

    The problem for Treadau is the F35s cancellation due to its cost was a major Election promise and he has been backed into a corner. Throw in the fight with Boeing and its become a very big Corner.

Leave a Comment to Raymond Cancel

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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