Close sidebar

RAAF F-35A training systems delivered to Williamtown

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 7, 2018

The An-124 unloading the weapons load trainer and ejection seat maintenance trainer at Williamtown. (Defence)

The RAAF has taken delivery of two key training systems for its forthcoming F-35A Lightning II fighters.
A weapons load trainer and an ejection systems maintenance trainer were delivered to RAAF Base Williamtown by an Antonov An-124 on May 2, and will be installed at the new Integrated Training Centre which is nearing completion at a greenfield site on the northern side of the base.
When assembled, the weapon load trainer represents the underside of an F-35 hybrid of all three models, split down the aircraft centreline. One side will be a weapons bay of the F-35A and C models which share a common weapons bay and forward fuselage, while the other side will be the smaller F-35B weapons bay and wider forward fuselage which houses that model’s lift-fan.
The trainer also features wing station hardpoints, with one side having the common wing and main undercarriage of the F-35A and B models, while the other side is an F-35C undercarriage and wing which is of greater span and has a wing-fold mechanism.
Using specialised ground support equipment, weapons handler, or ‘gunnies’ will be able to practice loading and unloading weapons from the weapons bays around the various low-slung doors, undercarriage and open panels.
US Marine Corps personnel train on an F-35 weapons load trainer. (USMC)

The ejection seat maintenance trainer allows maintenance personnel to remove and replace ejections seats in a controlled training environment.
A USAF ejection seat maintenance trainer. (USAF)

“The equipment delivered today will provide Australia with its own F-35 pilot and maintainer training capability and will form part of the overall Australian F-35A training system,” Defence Minister Senator Marise Payne said.
“Importantly this equipment will enable our pilots and crews to train without having to remove aircraft from flight schedules.”
The first two of six mission simulators are scheduled to be delivered to Williamtown in late-2018, with flight and maintenance training scheduled to commence at Williamtown from mid-2019.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

12 Comments

  • Rufus

    says:

    I remember standing in the playground at Williamtown Public School and watching the last F-18 arrive in its delivery flight.
    Makes me feel very old!

  • PAUL

    says:

    What that stuff cant fit into a C17?, amusing that a Russian built aircraft has to deliver the latest western defence hardware & support equipment. Forward thinking on the training units, as Raafies will also be able to support visiting F35 units that may not have support personnel available.

  • Beau

    says:

    I’d say Paul that the purchase contract would have included delivery. I do see the irony however.

  • Bill

    says:

    I assume that it wouldn’t be owned by the RAAF until it is “formally” handed over to them after delivery from the contractor. Plus the C-17s are more than likely tied up in other activities.

  • Paul

    says:

    Maybe the first 2 might be delivered at the end of the year after all! Here’s hoping.

  • George B

    says:

    The Antonov An-124 is Ukranian-built. If you recall, Russia invaded and annexed Crimea from Ukraine. Thus the Ukraine is no friend of Russia and for Antonov / Heavylift to be delivering defence equipment to the Western powers is a no-brainer.

  • Simon Crotty

    says:

    I used work in the same building as the Mirage simulator, talk about generational change.
    I was posted out about a month after the F/A-18’s arrived.

  • Greg

    says:

    F35B side on weapon loads trainer will come in handy when we buy the B model for LHD down the track,maybe I’m dreaming but it would be nice

  • Paul

    says:

    Greg, won’t be buying the B model. Yes it would be nice tho. Cheers.

  • jasonp

    says:

    Why not use the Antonov? It’s not like the RAAF had to pay for the delivery, that would have been included in the purchase price, and it’s much cheaper for LM or BAE to lease a commercial freighter than to pay to operate a dedicated there and back military mission.
    The weapons trainer is a standard hybrid model built by BAE for all operators, that’s why it has B and C model applications as well. It would cost much more to design, build and buy an A model only trainer.

  • Paul

    says:

    Off topic a bit, have heard the latest strikes in Syria were F-35s, does anyone know if this is the truth? Cheers.

  • Paul

    says:

    Well according to a USAF report, it costs $60000 an hr to fly and operate an F-35! The sim will get one hell of a workout!

Leave a Comment to Paul Cancel

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

RAAF F-35A training systems delivered to Williamtown

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 7, 2018

The An-124 unloading the weapons load trainer and ejection seat maintenance trainer at Williamtown. (Defence)

The RAAF has taken delivery of two key training systems for its forthcoming F-35A Lightning II fighters.
A weapons load trainer and an ejection systems maintenance trainer were delivered to RAAF Base Williamtown by an Antonov An-124 on May 2, and will be installed at the new Integrated Training Centre which is nearing completion at a greenfield site on the northern side of the base.
When assembled, the weapon load trainer represents the underside of an F-35 hybrid of all three models, split down the aircraft centreline. One side will be a weapons bay of the F-35A and C models which share a common weapons bay and forward fuselage, while the other side will be the smaller F-35B weapons bay and wider forward fuselage which houses that model’s lift-fan.
The trainer also features wing station hardpoints, with one side having the common wing and main undercarriage of the F-35A and B models, while the other side is an F-35C undercarriage and wing which is of greater span and has a wing-fold mechanism.
Using specialised ground support equipment, weapons handler, or ‘gunnies’ will be able to practice loading and unloading weapons from the weapons bays around the various low-slung doors, undercarriage and open panels.
US Marine Corps personnel train on an F-35 weapons load trainer. (USMC)

The ejection seat maintenance trainer allows maintenance personnel to remove and replace ejections seats in a controlled training environment.
A USAF ejection seat maintenance trainer. (USAF)

“The equipment delivered today will provide Australia with its own F-35 pilot and maintainer training capability and will form part of the overall Australian F-35A training system,” Defence Minister Senator Marise Payne said.
“Importantly this equipment will enable our pilots and crews to train without having to remove aircraft from flight schedules.”
The first two of six mission simulators are scheduled to be delivered to Williamtown in late-2018, with flight and maintenance training scheduled to commence at Williamtown from mid-2019.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

12 Comments

  • Rufus

    says:

    I remember standing in the playground at Williamtown Public School and watching the last F-18 arrive in its delivery flight.
    Makes me feel very old!

  • PAUL

    says:

    What that stuff cant fit into a C17?, amusing that a Russian built aircraft has to deliver the latest western defence hardware & support equipment. Forward thinking on the training units, as Raafies will also be able to support visiting F35 units that may not have support personnel available.

  • Beau

    says:

    I’d say Paul that the purchase contract would have included delivery. I do see the irony however.

  • Bill

    says:

    I assume that it wouldn’t be owned by the RAAF until it is “formally” handed over to them after delivery from the contractor. Plus the C-17s are more than likely tied up in other activities.

  • Paul

    says:

    Maybe the first 2 might be delivered at the end of the year after all! Here’s hoping.

  • George B

    says:

    The Antonov An-124 is Ukranian-built. If you recall, Russia invaded and annexed Crimea from Ukraine. Thus the Ukraine is no friend of Russia and for Antonov / Heavylift to be delivering defence equipment to the Western powers is a no-brainer.

  • Simon Crotty

    says:

    I used work in the same building as the Mirage simulator, talk about generational change.
    I was posted out about a month after the F/A-18’s arrived.

  • Greg

    says:

    F35B side on weapon loads trainer will come in handy when we buy the B model for LHD down the track,maybe I’m dreaming but it would be nice

  • Paul

    says:

    Greg, won’t be buying the B model. Yes it would be nice tho. Cheers.

  • jasonp

    says:

    Why not use the Antonov? It’s not like the RAAF had to pay for the delivery, that would have been included in the purchase price, and it’s much cheaper for LM or BAE to lease a commercial freighter than to pay to operate a dedicated there and back military mission.
    The weapons trainer is a standard hybrid model built by BAE for all operators, that’s why it has B and C model applications as well. It would cost much more to design, build and buy an A model only trainer.

  • Paul

    says:

    Off topic a bit, have heard the latest strikes in Syria were F-35s, does anyone know if this is the truth? Cheers.

  • Paul

    says:

    Well according to a USAF report, it costs $60000 an hr to fly and operate an F-35! The sim will get one hell of a workout!

Leave a Comment to Paul Cancel

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

RAAF F-35A training systems delivered to Williamtown

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 7, 2018

The An-124 unloading the weapons load trainer and ejection seat maintenance trainer at Williamtown. (Defence)

The RAAF has taken delivery of two key training systems for its forthcoming F-35A Lightning II fighters.
A weapons load trainer and an ejection systems maintenance trainer were delivered to RAAF Base Williamtown by an Antonov An-124 on May 2, and will be installed at the new Integrated Training Centre which is nearing completion at a greenfield site on the northern side of the base.
When assembled, the weapon load trainer represents the underside of an F-35 hybrid of all three models, split down the aircraft centreline. One side will be a weapons bay of the F-35A and C models which share a common weapons bay and forward fuselage, while the other side will be the smaller F-35B weapons bay and wider forward fuselage which houses that model’s lift-fan.
The trainer also features wing station hardpoints, with one side having the common wing and main undercarriage of the F-35A and B models, while the other side is an F-35C undercarriage and wing which is of greater span and has a wing-fold mechanism.
Using specialised ground support equipment, weapons handler, or ‘gunnies’ will be able to practice loading and unloading weapons from the weapons bays around the various low-slung doors, undercarriage and open panels.
US Marine Corps personnel train on an F-35 weapons load trainer. (USMC)

The ejection seat maintenance trainer allows maintenance personnel to remove and replace ejections seats in a controlled training environment.
A USAF ejection seat maintenance trainer. (USAF)

“The equipment delivered today will provide Australia with its own F-35 pilot and maintainer training capability and will form part of the overall Australian F-35A training system,” Defence Minister Senator Marise Payne said.
“Importantly this equipment will enable our pilots and crews to train without having to remove aircraft from flight schedules.”
The first two of six mission simulators are scheduled to be delivered to Williamtown in late-2018, with flight and maintenance training scheduled to commence at Williamtown from mid-2019.

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

12 Comments

  • Rufus

    says:

    I remember standing in the playground at Williamtown Public School and watching the last F-18 arrive in its delivery flight.
    Makes me feel very old!

  • PAUL

    says:

    What that stuff cant fit into a C17?, amusing that a Russian built aircraft has to deliver the latest western defence hardware & support equipment. Forward thinking on the training units, as Raafies will also be able to support visiting F35 units that may not have support personnel available.

  • Beau

    says:

    I’d say Paul that the purchase contract would have included delivery. I do see the irony however.

  • Bill

    says:

    I assume that it wouldn’t be owned by the RAAF until it is “formally” handed over to them after delivery from the contractor. Plus the C-17s are more than likely tied up in other activities.

  • Paul

    says:

    Maybe the first 2 might be delivered at the end of the year after all! Here’s hoping.

  • George B

    says:

    The Antonov An-124 is Ukranian-built. If you recall, Russia invaded and annexed Crimea from Ukraine. Thus the Ukraine is no friend of Russia and for Antonov / Heavylift to be delivering defence equipment to the Western powers is a no-brainer.

  • Simon Crotty

    says:

    I used work in the same building as the Mirage simulator, talk about generational change.
    I was posted out about a month after the F/A-18’s arrived.

  • Greg

    says:

    F35B side on weapon loads trainer will come in handy when we buy the B model for LHD down the track,maybe I’m dreaming but it would be nice

  • Paul

    says:

    Greg, won’t be buying the B model. Yes it would be nice tho. Cheers.

  • jasonp

    says:

    Why not use the Antonov? It’s not like the RAAF had to pay for the delivery, that would have been included in the purchase price, and it’s much cheaper for LM or BAE to lease a commercial freighter than to pay to operate a dedicated there and back military mission.
    The weapons trainer is a standard hybrid model built by BAE for all operators, that’s why it has B and C model applications as well. It would cost much more to design, build and buy an A model only trainer.

  • Paul

    says:

    Off topic a bit, have heard the latest strikes in Syria were F-35s, does anyone know if this is the truth? Cheers.

  • Paul

    says:

    Well according to a USAF report, it costs $60000 an hr to fly and operate an F-35! The sim will get one hell of a workout!

Leave a Comment to Paul Cancel

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Each day, our subscribers are more informed with the right information.

SIGN UP to the Australian Aviation magazine for high-quality news and features for just $99.95 per year