BBJ MAX launched on back of first order

written by australianaviation.com.au | April 3, 2014
The BBJ MAX 8 is based on the re-engine 737 MAX 8. (Boeing)
The BBJ MAX 8 is based on the re-engined 737 MAX 8. (Boeing)

Boeing has announced the launch of the Boeing Business Jet (BBJ) version of its re-engined 737 MAX series after the receipt of an order for a BBJ MAX 8 from an undisclosed customer.

“We are honoured that an existing BBJ customer has become the first to select the BBJ MAX,” Capt. Steve Taylor, president, Boeing Business Jets said in a statement. “The BBJ MAX provides more room, longer range and emits fewer emissions than its nearest competition, making it an ideal choice for today’s BBJ customers.”

The BBJ MAX 8 will have a range of 11,713 km, an increase of more than 1,482 km over the current 737-800-based BBJ2. Boeing says it will also develop a BBJ version of the 737 MAX 9, but there is no word on whether a MAX 7 will be offered.

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The first BBJ MAX is scheduled to be delivered to an interior customisation facility in 2018.

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19 Comments

  • Raymond

    says:

    The RAAF??

    The current BBJ contract is up soon…

  • marc

    says:

    …..RAAF could really use a 787. Better non stop capability.

  • Dane

    says:

    After the Garuda Airlines crash in Indonesia that killed a number of Australian journalists, there were calls to use a higher capacity aircraft to accommodate the press on international trips. Let’s hope the RAAF take heed.

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Those calls mainly came from the Parliamentary Press Gallery, but there are counter arguments that ask why the Govt should have to accommodate journos who travel with officials.
      The current SPA fleet has options to be rolled over if required, although the BBJs are generally accepted as being very dated and inflexible in their fit-outs.
      If a higher capacity aircraft was being considered, I’d suggest an A330-200 may be the most likely solution in order to retain commonality with the KC-30 fleet and the Qantas support system.
      Cheers
      Andrew

  • Red Barron

    says:

    On that Andrew, It would be a great read if you could do a story on the current BBJ’s in the RAAF. I would love to see the layout inside these, Is there beds? and meeting room with TV’s, Showers etc.

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      The BBJ interiors are not allowed to be photographed, and only very closely trusted press gallery journos are allowed on board, sorry.
      Cheers
      Andrew

  • Raymond

    says:

    What are the lead times for standing up an A330 SPA fleet? Could it be arranged in time for the current BBJ contract end?

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Would take a couple of years, although with the A330 already in service in KC-30 form and Qantas already having a large fleet in service, the limiting factor would more likely be aircraft availability.
      Cheers
      Andrew

  • Phs

    says:

    Maybe a larger long range aircraft is worth considering? A bit embarrassing to see the PM and entourage being flown to Japan in a KC30. (Especially when it goes U/S). Shouldn’t the very limited resource tanker be doing tanking rather than VIP work!

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      The PM isn’t on the KC-30, he’s on a BBJ. The KC-30 is carrying accompanying media and business leaders.
      Not sure what’s embarrassing about it – it has a premium and an economy cabin just like an airliner, and the crew are fully capable of providing in-flight service.
      Cheers
      Andrew

  • Raymond

    says:

    Andrew – yes, that’s what I meant… is it a realistic option as far as availability? What’s the position with Airbus if the RAAF approach them and say, we’d like you to tender on an SPA lease for when our current contract expires? Can Airbus have a couple of A330 SPA’s ready in time?

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      Anything is possible – as they say, ‘money talks’! I doubt Airbus would be a direct respondent to an RFT, more likely Qantas or Hawker Pacific or someone like that, and they in turn would buy or lease the aircraft from Airbus and support it in service.
      Cheers
      Andrew

  • Raymond

    says:

    Phs – not embarrassing in the slightest… the KC-30’s are very capable aircraft and can be utilised both in the AAR and strategic / long-range transport roles. What is being achieved in Japan, South Korea and China (3 of our 4 largest trading partners) is well and truly worth sending a KC-30 as well, hands down.

  • Phs

    says:

    I mean that it is a bit embarrassing that we need to use an expensive, highly modified aircraft, with capabilities as a tanker and cargo carrier that are highly sought after every day in the RAAF, to use to ferry press entourage around, rather than a far less expensive airliner type aircraft fit for purpose. although it can do it, and do it well – is it a good use of its capabilities?

    • australianaviation.com.au

      says:

      I doubt it would have been released for this task if it had been required by the ADF for AAR or ALS tasks.
      Cheers
      Andrew

  • Dane

    says:

    Might as well use the KC-30 for this than v have it sitting on the ground at Amberley doing nothing. I imagine it would be cheaper to use than a charter aircraft

  • Phs

    says:

    You might be right Andrew, but having been on the ‘receiving’ end myself for quite a few years, always trying to get tanker support, and 90% of the time being denied due to tankers being unavailable, I wonder…..

  • Dane

    says:

    One would hope that the KC-30 is more reliable than the 707

  • Raymond

    says:

    Well, we know what happened to the KC-30 in Japan!

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