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Labor candidate calls for Brisbane Airport curfew trial

written by australianaviation.com.au | January 9, 2014
A file image of domestic movements at Brisbane Airport. (Graham Bottomley)
A file image of domestic movements at Brisbane Airport. (Graham Bottomley)

The Labor candidate contesting the by-election for the federal seat of Griffith vacated by former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, Terri Butler, has called for the trialling of a curfew for Brisbane Airport.

“One thing that should certainly be on the cards is trialling a curfew. They do it in Sydney. There’s no reason why you couldn’t trial it in Brisbane,” Butler told theguardian.com.

“The real question for residents is that night-time period of 11pm to 6am where your kids are sleeping, where you’re asleep, it’s a weeknight and you have 15 flights across: how do you mitigate that noise?”

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The Liberal National Party candidate for the seat, Bill Glasson, told The Guardian that he felt a curfew was unnecessary, saying that the opening of Brisbane’s parallel runway in 2020 would allow more flights to approach the airport from over Moreton Bay.

The electorate of Griffith takes in several suburbs of Brisbane’s inner south, and is to the southwest of Brisbane Airport.

A review into aircraft noise over Brisbane was commissioned by then federal Transport Minister (and now Opposition Transport spokesperson) Anthony Albanese in August.

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16 Comments

  • KEN

    says:

    Another narrow minded near sighted would be politition

  • Mike Borgelt

    says:

    Another opportunistic Labor politician out to make a name for himself and to hell with the good of the country.
    I wonder how many of those who complain about aircraft noise own barking dogs? More than a few I bet.
    I can avoid aircraft noise by not living near an airport. Avoiding noisy dogs is much harder.

  • Marc

    says:

    ..and they call themselves a progressive political party.

  • Mitchell Bakota

    says:

    This proposal should be taken and buried in the middle of the Simpson Desert. The airport has been there for an untold length of time, why should there be a curfew now because some people really don’t want to wear earplugs at night?

  • Greg

    says:

    How ridiculous.

    BNE has operated this way since I remember. Narrow minded idea that would have an effect on the city as a whole and QLD as a state.

    Jobs, investments, and particular airline carriers would be lost

  • GlenCBR

    says:

    Go ahead. Let Brisbane airport close overnight. So the next nearest capable, curfew-free airport on the east coast would be …. Canberra. Bring the (overnight) dollars our way. Just get CBR airport to align their fees and charges with the potential opportunity and Brisbane can sleep while Canberra might get real (international) flights with real connections as required by any national capital.

  • Lucas

    says:

    How on earth are we going to compete with the rest if world with politicians like these? Just look at the debacle we have in Sydney!

  • Ben S

    says:

    90% of late evening/early morning departures are landing/taking off over Moreton Bay. Surely this politician has better things to address?? I live in Coorparoo on the flight path, noise is minimal.

  • Red Barron

    says:

    Clutching at straws here. Any thing to try and get some votes for labor. Some how I think they will loose and this silly idea will be forgot on about

  • Ray E

    says:

    There’s only about 12 movements between 11:00pm and 5:00am. So, in theory and dependant on wind direction, only 6 movements would be over housing with the rest out over Moreton Bay.

  • Surely getting rid of Terri Butler is easier then placing a curfew. I wonder how many times he himself has been out between 11pm and 6am in the Brisbane suburbs listening to this ‘noise’

  • GlenCBR

    says:

    Might be an idea to stop referring to Terri Butler as “he” … http://www.mauriceblackburnqld.com.au/our-people/professional/terri-butler.aspx
    and
    in terms of ‘policy development’: all parties and most candidates do a bit a ‘kite-flying’ before an election. That is, they ‘float’ and idea into the public arena to gauge support for it. If the proposal isn’t supported it ‘crash lands’ before or shortly after the election. I think this is an example of such a ‘kite’ which will crash so quietly that it won’t even generate 45dB (background noise) – well below the level needed to require a curfew..

  • Gary

    says:

    Idiotic, vote grabbing populism. Since when has any modern aircraft actually kept anyone awake. Jets nowadays are significantly quieter than almost all the Harley Davidson’s about the streets with no exhaust but you don’t see him promising to clamp down on that menace. Yet more drivel from the left of the political fence

  • Bob

    says:

    Just an ill-considered populist thought bubble by Terri Butler! Compared to Bill Glasson’s sensible reasoned comments.

    Knowing a bit about both of these people one would have done his homework, the other probably only considered her immediate self interest.

    A 24 hour BNE is absolutely critical for the Queensland economy and the many thousands of jobs it directly and indirectly sustains. Any credible elected representative would know that!

  • Mal

    says:

    In the words of that past Labor PM: “Recalcitrant!!”

  • John

    says:

    BNE airport is already a disaster + if BNE was closed at 2300 along with SYD would that make CBR or MEL the alternate for large aircraft (744’s or A380’s)?

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