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Army grounds Tigers over cockpit fumes

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 17, 2012
The Army has grounded its Tiger ARH fleet after fumes were detected in the cockpit of one of the helicopters. (Paul Sadler)

The Army has grounded its fleet of Tiger Armed Reconnaissance Helicopters after a pilot detected fumes in the cockpit of one of the machines.

Defence gave few details of the issue in a brief statement, saying only that all training flights had been suspended. The Army operates a fleet of 22 Tigers, three of which are currently undergoing retrofit. The $2 billion fleet remains in a testing and training phase and is not expected to enter service until the end of the year.

The last of Australia’s Tigers, which are based on a Eurocopter design, was delivered in December 2011 after a series of delays and controversies.

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Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

Army grounds Tigers over cockpit fumes

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 17, 2012
The Army has grounded its Tiger ARH fleet after fumes were detected in the cockpit of one of the helicopters. (Paul Sadler)

The Army has grounded its fleet of Tiger Armed Reconnaissance Helicopters after a pilot detected fumes in the cockpit of one of the machines.

Defence gave few details of the issue in a brief statement, saying only that all training flights had been suspended. The Army operates a fleet of 22 Tigers, three of which are currently undergoing retrofit. The $2 billion fleet remains in a testing and training phase and is not expected to enter service until the end of the year.

The last of Australia’s Tigers, which are based on a Eurocopter design, was delivered in December 2011 after a series of delays and controversies.

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Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

Army grounds Tigers over cockpit fumes

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 17, 2012
The Army has grounded its Tiger ARH fleet after fumes were detected in the cockpit of one of the helicopters. (Paul Sadler)

The Army has grounded its fleet of Tiger Armed Reconnaissance Helicopters after a pilot detected fumes in the cockpit of one of the machines.

Defence gave few details of the issue in a brief statement, saying only that all training flights had been suspended. The Army operates a fleet of 22 Tigers, three of which are currently undergoing retrofit. The $2 billion fleet remains in a testing and training phase and is not expected to enter service until the end of the year.

The last of Australia’s Tigers, which are based on a Eurocopter design, was delivered in December 2011 after a series of delays and controversies.

Advertisement
Advertisement

 

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

Army grounds Tigers over cockpit fumes

written by australianaviation.com.au | May 17, 2012
The Army has grounded its Tiger ARH fleet after fumes were detected in the cockpit of one of the helicopters. (Paul Sadler)

The Army has grounded its fleet of Tiger Armed Reconnaissance Helicopters after a pilot detected fumes in the cockpit of one of the machines.

Defence gave few details of the issue in a brief statement, saying only that all training flights had been suspended. The Army operates a fleet of 22 Tigers, three of which are currently undergoing retrofit. The $2 billion fleet remains in a testing and training phase and is not expected to enter service until the end of the year.

The last of Australia’s Tigers, which are based on a Eurocopter design, was delivered in December 2011 after a series of delays and controversies.

Advertisement
Advertisement

 

Steer your own in-flight experience – available on print and digital Whether our classic glossy magazine in your letterbox, daily news updates in your inbox, peeling back a few layers in the podcast or our monthly current affair reports, you can count on us to keep you up to date. Sign up today for just $99.95 for more exclusive offers here. Subscribe now at australianaviation.com.au.

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