Boeing rolls out 10,000th 737

Boeing employees point to a special 10,000 Deliveries logo on the fuselage. (Boeing/Twitter)
Boeing employees point to a special “10,000 Deliveries” logo on the fuselage. (Boeing/Twitter)

Boeing’s evergreen 737 program has reached a significant milestone with the 10,000th aircraft recently rolling off the production line.

The milestone was also celebrated by Spirit AeroSystems, whose Kansas plant has built the 737 fuselage since 1966.

The 737 fuselage has been made by Spirit AeroSystems in Wichita since 1966. (Spirit AeroSystems/Twitter)
The 10,000th 737 fuselage being prepared for delivery to Boeing at Spirit AeroSystems Wichita, Kansas, facility. (Spirit AeroSystems/Twitter)


VIDEO: Spirit AeroSystems looks back at the generations of families who have worked on the 737.


VIDEO: How a 737 is built, again from Sprit AeroSystems.

And Spirit AeroSystems staff from around the world celebrated the delivery of the 10,000th 737 fuselage to Boeing.

The first flight of a Boeing 737 took place more than 50 years ago in 1967.

The 737 can be categorised into four eras.

First came the “Originals”, which include the -100 and -200 series.

Then followed the “Classics” covering the -300, -400 and -500 series, and the “Next Generation” or NGs that was launched in 1993 and features the -600, -700, -800, and -900.

Finally, Boeing launched the fourth generation of 737, called the “MAX”, in 2011. There are five major variants within the MAX, the 7, 8, 9, 10 and 200.

Launch customer Malindo Air operated the first commercial flight with a 737 MAX in 2017.

Malindo Air first Boeing 737 MAX 8, 9M-LRC. (Boeing)
Malindo Air first Boeing 737 MAX 8, 9M-LRC. (Boeing)

In this part of the world, Qantas and Virgin Australia are both big operators of the 737 with 75 and 82 in their fleets, respectively.

Virgin Australia recently took delivery of its last new-build 737-800. The airline is also a MAX customer, with 40 of the type on order and due to arrive from the end of 2019.

The 10,000th 737 was due to be delivered to Southwest Airlines.

The 10,000th 737 at Boeing's Renton final assembly line. (Boeing/Twitter)
The 10,000th 737 at Boeing’s Renton final assembly line. (Boeing/Twitter)
The 10,000th 737 at Boeing's Renton final assembly line. (Boeing/Twitter)
The 10,000th 737 at Boeing’s Renton final assembly line. (Boeing/Twitter)

Comments

  1. Lechuga says

    That is actually amazing, the 737 cops a fair bit of flak when people prefer the A320, but in the real world it is an amazing workhorse that’s served airlines for decades and will continue to serve them.

    Congratulations to Boeing for creating an aircraft that’s been so popular it’s reached 10,000.

  2. Frequent Traveller says

    First flight in 1967 says it all really……yesterday’s technology and comfort.

  3. Mac Carter says

    Congratulations to Boeing and their workforce on reaching this milestone.
    Given the choice I personally prefer another manufacturer’s narrowbody offering,
    however the 737 has proven to be safe and reliable in Australian domestic service.

  4. James says

    @ Frequent Traveller

    Comfort has to do with the particular airlines configuration.

    What is still in the current 737 (apart from flight controls) that you would call yesterday’s technology?

  5. David says

    Frequent Traveller, the fact the 737 has been flying says it all. It is a fantastic plane. How many planes have been launched since 1967,and are no longer flying?

  6. Aussie says

    I was amazed of the enormity of the Everett Boeing plant. Amazing in size. And the organisation., I felt the Visitor foyer a let down. but now forgotten A good aircraft, but unfortunately the airlines use these to pack them and stack them I prefer the Airbus 320 but do not enjoy the howling engine noise . as i live just 7 miles from an ILS approach of our major airportWe down under wearepreviledged(ithink) incomponents manufacture andhope zDonald zTrump will leave the status quoo

    ALL BEST WISHES TO BOEING,sFuture

  7. random says

    Incredible to think that the 737 almost didn’t come into being.

    The story goes that Jack Steiner went behind the back of Bill Allen and the Boeing board in the early 1960s to personally advocate for the aircraft, and to get Lufthansa to commit to the launch order.

    Apparently if it weren’t for Steiner’s track record with the 727 he would have been close to the corporate chopping block.

    Nobody at that time could see the incredible flexibility of design that would allow generations of development and a 10000 aircraft legacy.

    Congratulations to Boeing.

  8. Mike Williamson says

    Fantastic Plane. Any perceived so called advantages another manufacturers’ narrow body might have is fictitious. If anything, the Boeing Sky Interior is the defining difference most passengers notice and prefer over others. Congratulations Boeing for the monumental achievement.