Singapore Airlines confirms 777-9, 787-10 orders

Singapore Airlines has signed firm orders for 20 Boeing 777-9s and 19 787-10s in a deal worth US$13.8 billion at list prices.

It is the first time the Singaporean flag carrier has ordered the 777X, although it already has more than 50 777s  – both -200s/-200ERs and -300/300ERs – in service.

Meanwhile SIA is already the launch customer for the 787-10, which it is due to place into service in the first half of next year. With that original order for 30 787-10s SIA now holds orders for 49 of the type, making it the double-stretched 787’s biggest customer.

The 777-9s will be operated primarily on long-haul routes and will enter service in the 2021-22 Singaporean financial year. The additional 787-10s, to be deployed on regional medium-haul routes, will be delivered from 2020-21.

The deal also includes options on six of each aircraft type.

“SIA has been a Boeing customer for many decades and we are pleased to have finalised this major order for widebody aircraft, which will enable us to continue operating a modern and fuel-efficient fleet,” SIA CEO Goh Choon Phong said in a statement.

“These new aircraft will also provide the SIA Group with new growth opportunities, allowing us to expand our network and offer even more travel options for our customers.”

The order, first announced in February this year, was signed in a ceremony at the White House in Washington DC witnessed by US President Donald Trump and Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.

Singapore Airlines' first Boeing 787-10 rolls out of final assembly. (Boeing)
Singapore Airlines’ first Boeing 787-10 rolls out of final assembly earlier this month. (Boeing)

SIA also has 67 A350s-900s on order from Airbus, including eight ultra long range models that will be used for nonstop flights from Singapore to Los Angeles and New York starting in 2018.

Comments

  1. Lechuga says

    I am pretty surprised they chose to take the -10 Dreamliner.

    Strange enough them picking up the 350 + ULR, and then the 777-9 seperate, most airlines are going for that 1 type strategy. The -10 Dreamliner just seems a little out of place, unless I was going to Scoot, but it’s not so it’s confusing.

    But in saying that now that Singapore has committed to the 777-9 hopefully it spurs then to develop the -10. Which Singapore flagged interest for the most.

  2. Roger says

    I’m really surprised at this. It makes me think that their A330 services will be taken on by A350, or will be taken over by SilkAir—but that means that SilkAir would need to get more aircraft.

  3. Riplander says

    Wonder if they have flexibility to get B777-8X aircraft? They could use some if the North American non-stop services exceed expectations, and may even be considered to resume services to Brazil (if it has that range).

  4. Patrickk says

    The 78-10 is much the same seating as the A333 and a tiny bit more range, so that is what is being replaced. The A333neo has had its range upped a bit to compete directly with the 78-10. The A359 is designed for longer routes as is the 78-9.

  5. Graham Haxall says

    Strange that they would choose to operate both Airbus and Boeing aircraft in the same fleet?

  6. Adam says

    Graham Haxall not strange at all for a huge airline. Imagine in the massive worldwide recession that’s just starting to kick in, they put all their eggs in one basket & that manufacturer had a hiccup.

  7. AlanH says

    SIA don’t make crucial purchasing mistakes at this level. If they believe that their market requires both Airbus and Boeing products then there must be sound economic reasons for doing so, despite the diversity of their fleet and the attendant maintenance/training issues that such decision results in. Look at the sheer number of aircraft involved! Meanwhile, Qantas gets all “cock-a-hoop” over acquiring eight B787-9s in its beleaguered fleet. Doesn’t bear thinking about!

  8. keigo Namba says

    Singapore has been always a good and frequent buyers of Boeing..
    They buy outright without any loan or lease plane. and they know what to buy for their country operational requirements compared to Qantas or Jetstar operational requirements.