Parafield Airport publishes preliminary draft master plan

A image of Parafield Airport from the preliminary draft master plan. (Parafield Airport)
A image of Parafield Airport from the preliminary draft master plan. (Parafield Airport)

Parafield Airport says it will remain South Australia’s principal general aviation and civilian flight training centre over the next 20 years while building up its commercial, retail and industrial activities.

The airport has published its preliminary draft master plan for public comment which details the expected increase in aircraft movements on its four runways, as well as improvements to airfield facilities and the development of its “enterprise precinct”.

The document said the number of aircraft movements was expected to increase by 1.8 per cent to 345,437 by 2037, from 213,990 in 2016.

“The forecast numbers of movements are below the predicted Practical Ultimate Capacity of 450,000 movements in the forecasting (20-year) period,” the preliminary draft master plan said.

In addition to pilot training, there are also flights for crop dusting, aerial photography, search and rescue, firefighting and police. Parafield Airport said there had also been an increase in charter flights to service mining activities in South Australia.

The airport said it would continue to work with training schools, Airservices Australia and local councilsto minimise the impact of noise on nearby residents, while maintaining the focus on the safety of flying operations.

Five aviation-training companies operate out of Parafield Airport, namely Adelaide Flight Training Centre, Bruce Hartwig Flying School, Flight Training Adelaide, Aerostar Aviation and University of South Australia Aviation Academy.

The document estimated entities that operated in association with Parafield Airport directly employed 1,100 people on-site and 261 people off-site, for a total of 1,361 people.

Parafield Airport managing director Mark Young said plans to increase its aviation activity and non-aviation businesses would support more jobs.

“The Parafield Airport Master Plan forecasts that in the next five years, with the development of aviation training and commercial developments, the numbers of jobs on the airport will increase by a further 750 people,” Young said in a statement on Wednesday.

“This continued growth is providing local job opportunities and a significant contribution to the northern Adelaide region.”

The preliminary draft master plan noted the airport’s base for helicopter service, maintenance and training would be relocated to a proposed new aviation site.

There were also plans to upgrade taxiways and reseal runways, as well as expand and construct run-up bays, which were at capacity causing aircraft to queue on the apron during peak periods.

Meanwhile, Parafield Airport is looking to build up its enterprise precinct at the southern end of the site.

“It is proposed that a range of commercial, industrial, warehousing and possible aviation-related support industries be established in the precinct,” the preliminary draft master plan said.

“A railway spur link, which may be established in the adjoining Runways Precinct, could provide additional opportunities for the movement of materials and products into, or out of, the enterprise precinct.”

The preliminary draft master plan is available on the Parafield Airport website. The public comment period closes on October 18 2017.

Comments

  1. S Jensen says

    Your statement that flight movements would increase from 213990 in 2016 to 345437 in 2037 (twenty years) is flawed. It is certainly more than 1.8% actually an increase of 131,447 movements. It could also be more than that figure.

    I believe the current movements figure of 213,990 is incorrect but this is what people are told. It does not include all of the circuits flown at Parafield Airport which Air Services claim are too difficult to report.

    The jobs figures quoted are also wildly misleading. The 1100 employees they claim to have on site includes many large shops including Bunnings based on Airport land. Those employees and the economic benefit from retail have little to do the Parafield Airport should be excluded.

    Parafield Airport’s aviation businesses claim to have 451 on site employees but even that is questionable,

    More spin and half truths in their grandiose plan.

  2. S Jensen says

    Sorry – amend 3rd last sentence to – Those employees and the economic benefit from retail premises should be excluded from the Airport’s misleading employment figures.