Northrop Grumman connects RAAF simulators to US test lab

Operating from the CAE KC-30 simulator at RAAF Amberley, a No. 33 Squadron pilot approaches a United States KC-135 simulated aircraft.Northrop Grumman Australia has announced that it has successfully demonstrated the value of distributed connectivity by linking up two Royal Australian Air Force simulators and a company test lab in the US, providing virtual training at multiple sites.

The demonstration saw a KC-30A simulator and a C-17A Globemaster simulator at RAAF Base Amberley connected with a Northrop Grumman laboratory in Orlando, Florida, the company said in a statement.

This industry-funded demonstration, which was conducted in conjunction with CAE and L-3 Communications, followed a survey of the RAAF Air Mobility Group’s KC-30A, C-17A and C-130J Hercules simulators to determine their operating standards compared to those of the US Air Force’s Distributed Mission Operations Network (DMON).

DMON, for which Northrop Grumman is the prime contractor, is a system that enables dissimilar aircraft platforms located at different sites to interoperate and train together in a realistic virtual environment.

“In these times of increased operational tempo and stretched resources, the ability to connect and execute distributed missions virtually across multiple sites across the globe is a real force-multiplying capability,” said Ian Irving, chief executive of Northrop Grumman Australia.

“We are grateful for the opportunity to have worked closely with CAE and L-3 on this important demonstration. And, as a world leader in the provision of distributed networks through its DMON system to the US Air Force, Northrop Grumman looks forward to the potential development of a persistent capability for the Australian Defence Force.”

Operating from the CAE KC-30 simulator at RAAF Amberley, No. 33 Squadron pilots approach a United States KC-135 simulated aircraft.